Clinical Study-Parkinsons Disease Dementia Study

Parkinson’s Disease Dementia (PDD) study

 ClinicalTrials.gov is the official US government website for all FDA approved medical trials for Parkinson’s Disease, Stroke, Dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Alzheimer’s Disease, Traumatic Brain Injury and all other medical conditions.  It is available for anyone to look up and retrieve contact information for the investigator site(s) or study sponsor to contact if interested in participating in research studies.
The following  clinical trial information is being provided for informational purposes only and The NeuroCommunity Foundation is not responsible for the products under investigation or the studies themselves in any way.
For those interested in participating in the evaluation of a new product that Altura Pharmaceuticals is developing that is hoped to lessen the impact of Parkinson’s Disease Dementia (PDD) by improving wakefulness, cognitive and motor function, below is the  contact information .
  • Telephone contact: 866-446-4135
  • Email (confidential): studysite@alturastudies.com

PD Education from Home January 2018

January 2018 PD EDUCATION FROM HOME

PD Expert Briefing    

Topic : Freezing or sweating falls when walking with Parkinson’s Disease

Tuesday, January. 16, 2018, 10 am  – 11 am  PST 

Fay B. Horak, Ph.D., P.T.

To Register: Copy and paste the following website, into your server

http://event.netbriefings.com/event/pdeb/Live/falls2/register.html


LSVT Webinar

Wednesday,January 24 2018

 11am  – 12 noon

Keep it BIG! Tune Ups and other Post-Discharge Recommendations in LSVT BIG®

How do you maintain the BIG gains you made in LSVT BIG treatment and stay motivated once treatment has concluded? Join LSVT BIG Faculty to hear valuable insights on post-discharge recommendations following LSVT BIG, including continued daily homework practice, tune-up sessions and BIG for LIFE® maintenance groups. Opportunities will be provided for you to ask questions during the webinar through voice and chat options.

RegistrationLink: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6611462755464165121

 

MJ Fox,  and PD Telephone at home webinar information not available at this time.


The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216                          

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 


January News and PD Support Group Listings

Image result for photo of new year 2018

Happy New Year from THE NEUROCOMMUNITY FOUNDATION!

The NeuroCommunity Foundation:

Phone: 818-745-5051

We hope everyone had a safe and peaceful holiday season.

May the coming year bring good health and happiness to all!

We also hope we can count on your donations to continue our efforts in providing YOU personalized Information and Resources, Education, Symposiums, Up-to-date Research & Clinical trials, Advocacy, Wellness and our PD Support groups! Donations accepted online or can be mailed to us.

At the HELPFUL INFORMATION tab, at our website,

you can read about MEDICARE CHANGES for 2018 and New Medicare cards

CLICK HERE:  January PD SUPPORT GROUP LISTINGS 

***************

Meet the January guest speakers by Clicking on their name !      

 Allison Smith  Parkinson’s in Balance ( Live Wires Burbank)      

Amy CarlsonEvery Victory Counts, Davis Phinney Foundation  (Santa Barbara)     

 Danica Tolentino CSUN Research- Gait Study  (Simi Valley)

 Dennis Cante Dance helps PD -Even the Tango!  (Claremont) 

 Holly Sacks  – Mindfullness for PD   (Sherman Oaks) 

 Wayne Pickerell – Clinical Research and Trials  in PD  (Ventura)

Karol Ann Sample – Assisted Home Health & Hospice What and Who is Hospice?  Everything you need to know. (Camarillo)     

 

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PD Education Events —  Pasadena – Advances in DBS    January 9                         Free Lecture

*****************

New articles on our website: 

–Sugar and the Brain,

–MS Research progress in 2017,

–Autoimmunity and PD ,

–Caregiver Reminders  for 2018,

–Free Caregiver workshops in Glendale,

–Medicare changes in 2018 and Be Inspired- new thoughts for 2018! 

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Breaking News: CSUN  Clinical Research  GAIT and PD  Sign up to participate in this  study.

******************

PD   Educational Webinars

-Freezing or Sweating Falls When Walking with Parkinson’s Disease 

Additional educational webinar information was not available at this time. Please check back later.

MAILING ADDRESS:

The NeuroCommunity Foundation  

32705 Vanowen St.  # 216  

West Hills, CA  91307

TELEPHONE: (818.745.5051)

 

2018 Caregiver lectures free to the public

C.A.L.M. EDUCATION SERIES (GLENDALE)

JANUARY 11, 2018 @ 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM PST

Recurring Events all year long!

A monthly “Caregivers Are Learning More (C.A.L.M.)” education series  occurs at the Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Live Well Senior Lounge, 1509 Wilson Terrace, Glendale, 91206. Each month we will explore different topics related to family caregiving. 

This series is free and open to the community. Please call us toll-free at 1-855-872-6060 for more information.

List of Topics (January 2018 through June 2018):
January 11, 2018:   “CALM About: Things Every Caregiver Should Know”
February 8, 2018:  “CALM About: How to Hire In-Home Help”
March 8, 2018:       “CALM About: Community Care Options”
April 12, 2018:        “CALM About: Forming a Social Support System”
May 10, 2018:         “CALM About: Fall Prevention/Home Safety”
June 14, 2018:        “CALM About: Communicating with Medical Professionals”

Date:

January 11, 2018

Time:

9:30 am – 11:30 am

Event Category:

Caregiver Education

Organizer

Yvonne Kuo

Phone:

213-821-6919

Venue

Glendale Adventist Medical Center (Live Well Senior Lounge)

1509 Wilson Terrace
Glendale, CA 91206 United States
+ Google Map

Phone:

1-855-872-6060

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                      23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                        West Hills, CA 91307

 

Welcoming in 2018

Happy New Year and may each day

be peaceful as your senses are awakened!

It is almost the time when we mark the days that have seemingly flown by. We welcome the chance to begin again…counting more slowly… so as to relish each moment of 2018.

It goes too fast.      Let’s drag our feet.

Let’s not fill the time we have up to the top of the rim of our glasses. Be careful not to spill the moments. Each of our sips hold a memory in place.

I wish you all amazing loves, bold adventures, bodies that work perfectly fine and smiles that reflect your gratitude for it all. We are all blessed to be here – however we are.

 Here is a giant hug in celebration of our new year…..
from Joani

“Yesterday is gone. Tomorrow has not yet come. We have only today.                   Let us begin.” — Mother Teresa

Think Big And Don’t Listen To People Who Tell You It Can’t Be Done. Life’s Too Short To Think Small.”- Tim Ferriss

“Move Out Of Your Comfort Zone. You Can Only Grow If You Are Willing To Feel Awkward And Uncomfortable When You Try Something New.”                   – ­Brian Tracy 

“I think in terms of the day’s resolutions, not the years.”  — Henry Moore

   “Stop saying yes to things you dislike “­­­ —–Anonymous

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                         23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                             West Hills, CA 91307

 

Lecture on new Advances in DBS Pasadena January 2018

Related image

Presentation on New Advances in DBS treatments

January 9, 2018

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy has been proven over the past 20 years* to be an effective treatment option for symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The latest advancements to DBS offer innovations in the way the therapy is delivered and how it is controlled. Attend this free informational seminar to learn more about DBS therapy, including the benefits and risks of this therapy. Call 323-326-4158 or email jsykes@sjm.com to reserve your spot.

Igor Fineman, MD, FACS
Jennifer Birch, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC
Raymond Neurosurgery & Spine
Yvette Yeung, MD | DaVita Healthcare Partners
Tyler Cheung, MD | Huntington Hospital

January 9, 2018 | 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
South Pasadena Public Library Community Room
1115 El Centro Ave
Pasadena, CA 91030

Caregiver reminders for the New Year

 

New Year’s 2018: Resolutions for Caregivers

Posted by Peter Andersen,

As the New Year approaches, it often brings a feeling of optimism. That’s a welcome gift, especially for those of us caring for the elderly.

To help maximize this optimism, we’ve gathered 13 New Year’s resolutions geared specifically toward caregivers.

Resolution 1: Write a personal mission statement for the year. Chicago-based author and senior caregiving expert Joy Loverde offers a way to plan for a positive year ahead. Loverde is the author of several books, including Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old? “At the end of every year I create a personal mission statement… that provides me with a path for success in my personal relationships,” she explains. With goals clearly stated, “I never have to wonder – Did I say I love you enough?” Set a few benchmarks for yourself and post them where you can see them for daily motivation.

Resolution 2: Learn to take a break. This definitely should be one of your New Year’s goals. The key word here is “learn.” People tell you every day you should take a break, but we all know it’s easier said than done. “Caregivers are known for putting their loved one’s needs above their own,” says Peter Ross, CEO of Senior Helpers in Towson, MD. “While the goal is to give your aging loved ones the best quality of life possible, you also need to understand the importance of taking care of yourself. Time-outs, yoga and getting ‘you time’ time in are great starters to creating work-life balance.”

Resolution 3: Get moving. Another priority goal: Activity. Keeping your body moving, blood circulating and muscles working is crucial to your own health, but you may not feel like you have time. Start with a commitment of 5 to 10 minutes and then increase that if you can. It doesn’t have to be all at once to bring benefits. It’s also a good way to engage more with aging loved ones. For example, Ross suggests creating a 3-day walking challenge. “Help them walk a few minutes each day, and increase the time daily – with a rest day every so often, of course!” This way, both of you gets some activity.

Resolution 4: Eat smart. Grabbing some grub on the run is no crime, but restaurant food (even fast food) can get expensive and isn’t always the best way to support your health and your family’s. Most major food magazines and websites feature recipes that take 30 minutes or less. And lots of grocery stores now offer online ordering, enabling you to schedule a pick-up or in some cases a home delivery.

Resolution 5: Be more social. “Social interaction is important for brain activity as well as morale,” Ross notes. Avoid caregiver isolation! In addition to seeing friends, engage in hobbies and other activities that you like – and don’t feel guilty about it! Get crafty about combining activities, like finding an art gallery, book talk or class you can attend during your parent’s weekly physical therapy appointment, or asking a friend to tag along while you’re running errands.

Resolution 6: Plan ahead. Caring for our parents often gives us an opportunity to consider our own desires for aging well. The New Year is a terrific time to jot down a few ideas about how and where you’d like to age, and then meet with your CPA, banker or financial planner to discuss what’s needed to get there. Also make sure you have the right legal documents to ensure your wishes are followed, such as durable and health care powers of attorney, wills, etc.

Resolution 7: Tackle stress. Stress has an enormous impact on our day to day quality of life, and our overall health. “Stress is like the monkey on our back, gripping your neck with its hands until you can’t breathe,” says Bobbe White, author of If Stress is Garbage, I’ve Bin There, Recycled That. That’s why it’s critical to reduce stress wherever possible. Even small things like 5 minutes of quiet breathing in your car every day, or subbing one yoga session for an exercise class helps take the edge off.

Resolution 8: Capture memories. One of the hardest things about losing a parent is wanting to hear some of their old stories or understanding family connections. This year, commit to sitting down with your older loved ones to get them to share your and their favorite memories. You may just take some notes, or you can make audio or video recordings using your cell phone. This is also a great way to get your kids engaged with their elders – young people are very adept at making excellent digital audio and video.

Resolution 9: Investigate options. Although it can feel uncomfortable, planning ahead for assisted living, long-term care and death makes going through those transitions easier for everyone. Resolve this year to investigate options for care and the monetary requirements for getting it. This includes understanding your parents’ desires and financial position, as well as your own.

Resolution 10: Increase safety for your parents. A recent study published in the Journal of Safety Research found that each year, “millions of people over 65 are treated in emergency rooms, with over 800,000 hospitalized for broken hips or head injuries, and 53% of those with fall-related hip fractures fall again within six months.” Whether your parents live independently or with you, make a point this year to learn about fall hazards, including medications and medical conditions. Then take steps to reducing the likelihood of a trip and tumble, like re-routing cables and cords and investigating a medical alert solution with fall detection.

Resolution 11: Get organized. This is another item that’s on everyone’s list of New Year’s resolutions, but it’s a good one, especially when you’re caring for aging parents. Make a short list of things that need better organization, like the kids’ homework zone, Mom’s closet or even the files on your computer. Then make a plan to complete at least one each month. If you’re not a master organizer, you probably have a friend who’s one. If you feel emotional about clearing up the clutter, you may need more structured assistance. “I see drawers and closets stuffed to the gills – and typically what is being kept is because [we] feel guilty about letting things go,” says Bill Bliesath, a professional organizer with offices in Los Angeles and Minneapolis. Someone who’s not close to you can often be more effective at helping you work through those feelings so you can make better decisions about what to keep, donate or toss.

Resolution 12: Create a family calendar. “It’s too easy to lose track of the multiple deadlines and requirements without a planner,” Bliesath notes. An old-school desk planner or calendar is useful, but online versions that reside in the cloud and are accessible from any device any time are even better. Most enable you to assign each person a color, and control access to editing. Most importantly, you can set up reminders so you don’t miss a thing. It’s also another way to get kids engaged. “Parents should be involved daily checking the planner and helping the kids keep it updated,” he adds.  “Learning good planner use skills is an incredibly valuable life lesson.”

Resolution 13: Ask for and accept help. This may be the most important New Year’s resolution of all for caregivers. None of us likes to feel needy, so we frequently forgo asking for assistance. This year, resolve to lightening your emotional and physical load as much as possible. “Start accepting help from friends, family, neighbors, and professionals who are willing to pitch in and help with caregiving,” suggests Jennifer L. FitzPatrick, founder of Generations Health in Chester, MD, and author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing the Stress of Caring for Your Loved One. And don’t be afraid to ask people for specific support, like picking up your kids at school or dropping off the dry cleaning. You might even consider a ride-haling service to ferry your parent or children from one appointment to another.

Following some or all of these resolutions will make life better for you and the person you’re caring for.

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gait study at CSUN Register now for PD individuals

REGISTER for PD GAIT STUDY at CSUN seeking participants now!

This study is on the gait (walking patterns) of individuals with Parkinson’s disease

Each participant will need to complete four 1-hour visits where they will be partaking in 20 minutes of exercise, with a different exercise mode being performed each visit. These exercise modes include treadmill walking, overground walking, elliptical training, and recumbent stepping.

Click here for an informational flyer Gait study 

If you’d like any additional information or have any questions, please feel free to contact me.  Danica Tolentino, Graduate Researcher

danicamarie.tolentino.606@my.csun.edu

(818) 263-6181 Center of Achievement through Adapted Physical Activity

Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Northridge

 

Autoimmunity and Parkinsons Disease

Researchers have found the first direct evidence that autoimmunity — in which the immune system attacks the body’s own tissues — plays a role in Parkinson’s disease, the neurodegenerative movement disorder. The findings raise the possibility that the death of neurons in Parkinson’s could be prevented by therapies that dampen the immune response.

The study, led by scientists at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, was published today in Nature.

“The idea that a malfunctioning immune system contributes to Parkinson’s dates back almost 100 years,” said study co-leader David Sulzer, PhD, professor of neurobiology (in psychiatry, neurology and pharmacology) at CUMC. “But until now, no one has been able to connect the dots. Our findings show that two fragments of alpha-synuclein, a protein that accumulates in the brain cells of people with Parkinson’s, can activate the T cells involved in autoimmune attacks.

“It remains to be seen whether the immune response to alpha-synuclein is an initial cause of Parkinson’s, or if it contributes to neuronal death and worsening symptoms after the onset of the disease,” said study co-leader Alessandro Sette, Dr. Biol. Sci., professor in the Center for Infectious Disease at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology in La Jolla, Calif. “These findings, however, could provide a much-needed diagnostic test for Parkinson’s disease, and could help us to identify individuals at risk or in the early stages of the disease.”

[Read more…]

2018 Medicare changes-New Medicare Cards are coming

Medicare changes for 2018

New Medicare cards are coming

Medicare will mail new Medicare cards between April 2018 and April 2019. Your new card will have a new Medicare Number that’s unique to you, instead of your Social Security Number. This will help to protect your identity. See an example of the new Medicare card at the Medicare.com website.

Things to know about your new Medicare card

  • You don’t need to take any action to get your new Medicare card.
  • The new card won’t change your Medicare coverage or benefits.
  • Medicare will never ask you to give us personal or private information to get your new Medicare Number and card. Learn more about the limited situations in which Medicare can call you by calling Medicare directly.
  • There’s no charge for your new card.

Whether you have been in Medicare for quite a while or are new to the federal health plan for individuals over 65, there are some important changes to the program for 2018.

Medicare experts strongly suggest that even if you are satisfied with your current coverage you should review your plans during open enrollment, which closes Dec. 7.

Here’s what’s new for 2018:

Part B premiums: Medicare Part B pays for doctor visits and other outpatient services.

• If you are on Medicare but not yet collecting Social Security benefits, your Part B monthly premium is expected to hold steady at $134.

• If you are collecting Social Security, which automatically pays your Part B premium, you’re paying about $109 a month in 2017 because of a law that prevents Medicare premiums from lowering Social Security payments. That amount could change for 2018 depending on how the 2 percent Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) affects your individual monthly payment.

Medicare Advantage (MA) premiums dip: The average monthly premium is expected to be about $30 next year, a slight decrease of $1.91 a month. MA plans are a private insurance alternative to original Medicare. They cover Part A (hospital), Part B (doctor and other outpatient services) and usually Part D, prescription drugs. Note: This is just an average. Premiums vary widely based on where you live and what your plan covers.

More choice of MA plans: The number of MA plans available across the country is increasing. In 2018, 99 percent of Medicare beneficiaries will have access to an MA plan, and 85 percent will be able to choose among 10 or more MA plans.

Prescription drug (Part D) premiums dip: These monthly charges are expected to decline slightly to an average of $33.50, compared with $34.70 a month in 2017. This premium decline will be the first for Part D since 2012. Premiums vary by where you live and what plan you select. Make sure your current plan still covers all your medications — and explore the cost.

Part D coverage gap narrows: Once the total cost of your prescriptions reaches a certain threshold — set each year by the federal government — you pay more for your prescriptions. That’s because of a quirky aspect of Part D called the coverage gap, also known as the doughnut hole. For 2018, once you have incurred $3,750 worth of drug costs, you’ll be in the coverage gap. At that point, you’ll pay 35 percent of the cost of brand-name drugs and 44 percent of generics. You’ll continue to pay those prices until the total cost of your drugs reaches $5,000. Once you’ve hit that limit, you’ll no longer be in the doughnut hole and you’ll pay no more than 5 percent of your drug costs for the rest of the year.

The doughnut hole has been narrowing each year since the Affordable Care Act was passed in 2010. The gap will close in 2020, and beneficiaries will pay 25 percent of the cost of all their prescriptions.

High-income surcharges: Medicare beneficiaries with incomes at a certain level pay higher Part B and D premiums. What’s different for 2018 is that more people will be subject to these surcharges because the income thresholds have changed. For 2018, if you are an individual earning $133,500 a year or a couple earning $267,000 a year, your premiums will increase. You can find the complete chart of the surcharges at Medicare.gov.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                            23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                                 West Hills, CA 91307

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

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Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

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Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process