What causes brain freeze?

 

What causes brain freeze?

Source:  Texas A & M University

Your favorite ice cream sundae can be the perfect treat to end a hot day. Or maybe a cold smoothie with your favorite fruits and vegetables to start the day strong. No matter your choice of treat, these delicious cold foods — and especially beverages — can stop you in your tracks with a good ol’ case of sphenolopalatine ganglioneuralgia — or brain freeze.

What is a brain freeze?

We’ve all done it — despite our better judgement. The heat and mild dehydration can be overwhelming and cause us to guzzle down a particularly chilly treat that leaves us with a quick and intense headache. After many personal at-home experiments, it’s safe to say that we’ve learned the cause-and-effect portion of what causes a brain freeze. However, it’s deeper than just the cold temperatures ‘freezing’ your brain.

“A brain freeze is what happens when cold food touches a bundle of nerves in the back of the palate,” said Stephanie Vertrees, MD, headache specialist, neurologist and clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine. “The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is a group of nerves that are sensitive to cold food, and when they’re stimulated, they relay information that stimulates a part of the brain to have a headache.”

The SPG and headaches

The SPG is a very important bundle of nerves, and although it’s the source of brain freeze, this group of nerves is also the cause of other types of headaches.

“This is the same ganglion that is responsible for migraine headaches and cluster headaches,” Vertrees said. “There has been a lot of research done on this bundle of nerves, but mostly for trying to prevent these more serious and longer-lasting headaches. We now have two different kinds of devices for the SPG. One device blocks the nerve with a numbing agent, and the other that stimulates it electronically with the goal of eliminating or preventing migraine or cluster headaches from occurring.

Obviously, that approach is a bit extreme for treating a brain freeze, but these links between the different types of headaches can help people who suffer from migraines. “Many people will try to give themselves a brain freeze to try to break a migraine headache,” Vertrees said. “It may not work for everyone or work every time, but giving yourself a brain freeze can possibly alleviate a migraine.”

Avoiding and treating a brain freeze

There are several (obvious) ways to avoid a brain freeze, but fewer ways to treat one. “To avoid brain freeze, eat the cold food much more slowly so that your mouth can warm up the food — don’t inhale it,” Vertrees said. “Keep it in the front of your mouth: the further-back stimulation is what triggers the brain freeze.”

However, if you find yourself a victim to an ice cream headache, there’s a trick you can do to try and warm your way out of one. If you begin feeling a brain freeze coming on, press your tongue to the roof of your mouth. The heat from your tongue will warm up the sinuses behind your nose and then warm the ganglion that caused the brain freeze.

“Brain freezes are not dangerous and very self-limiting,” Vertrees said. “It’s about slowing down and being patient and aware of the likelihood of getting a brain freeze if you eat or drink too fast.”

 

 

PD Education events for September

 

SEPTEMBER EDUCATIONAL EVENTS/ PODCAST

PD EXPERT BRIEFING:

TOPIC: Nutrition and Parkinson’s disease

Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017 10 – 11 am PDT

Learn more about nutrition and weight management in Parkinson’s by joining a one-hour Parkinson’s Foundation online seminar led by John Eric Duda, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence  and Director, Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center.

How do I register to view a live PD ExpertBriefing?

  1. You can register for each individual seminar beginning approximately one month before it is scheduled to take place by visiting pdf.org/en/online_education_upcomingOR
  2. michaeljfox.org/understanding-parkinsons/webinar-registration.

( HINT:copy and paste the website into your browser and it will take you to the website)

MJ  Fox Webinar 

TOPIC: Keeping Step with Parkinson’s: Balance, Posture & Gait

Keeping Step with Parkinson’s: Balance, Posture and Gait

Thursday, September 21   

Time: 9am – 10 am Pacific Time

We’re replaying a popular webinar on managing gait and balance dysfunction from our archives this month. While we won’t be able to send your questions to our panelists, we will have an expert team answering through the chat function.

PD TELEPHONE AT HOME:  

Tuesday,September. 12, 2017  

Go to www.parkinsons.va.gov for speaker and topic information.

Not available at time of posting.

Time: 10:00 am to 11:00 am Pacific Time – (1 hour)

Call-in number 1-800-767-1750 enter code 54321#

Call-in:  1-800-767-1750   Code 54321#   (call in about 3 min prior to the hour)

This phone-in session is the 2nd Tuesday of each month

LSVT:   No webinar in September

 

September news – All the information you’ll need while eating ice cream

SEPTEMBER NEWS from The NeuroCommunity Foundation

        PHONE NUMBER: 818-745-5051

Find all detailed information about educational events, speakers, support groups and more at our website: www.neurocommunity.org

REMEMBER: Scroll down on each page to locate all website posts.  

****Support groups  & Guest speakers are listed below!  Keep scrolling!

PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT TO THE NEUROCOMMUNITY FOUNDATION ! MAKE A DONATION TODAY

Your gift helps to provide support groups, advocacy, referrals, personal communication with our Education Director and innovative programs to help patients, families and caregivers achieve a better quality of life!!! Donations can be made directly at our website by clicking here: www.neurocommunity.org   Checks can be mailed to our address below!

We hope you will  continue to support us when you shop at Ralph’s grocery store. All participants are required to register for the new term online at www.ralphs.com or by calling us at 800-443-4438 starting September 1, 2017. Even if your participants registered as recently as June, July or August 2017, they are required to register again beginning September 1st. 

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO READ THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES 

PD CLINICAL TRIALS : Many clinical trials throughout California in numerous cities ( Reseda, Ventura, Pasadena and other cities.)

WELLNESS : How can massage help with Neurological disorders?

CAREGIVING:  A new approach to challenging family member

PD:  Golf and Parkinson’s: A new hobby can do wonders

STROKE: Stroke recovery includes adding challenges in your life.

TBI: What causes Brain Freeze?

MS: Horseback riding improves balance!

BE INSPIRED: A must read that will bring a smile!

HELPFUL INFORMATION:   Making the Most out of Your Visit to the Neurologist:   A Check-up Checklist

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS: CSUN Internship, Music Mends Minds & Songshine Foundation

———————————————————————————————————

CLICK HERE:   SEPT 2017 SUPPORT GROUP LISTINGS

Click on the colored link to “MEET THE SPEAKER”

Tara Tamaddon  MPH and Registered DietitianNutrition and PD (BURBANK)

 Teri Helton RN : Hygiene and Grooming in PD  Livingston Memorial-Visiting Nurses Association (OJAI)

David Higgins PhD.   Stem Cell Therapies and PD Are we closer? (WESTLAKE)

Eileen Gold  Geriatric Care ManagerHow GCM’s can assist you and your family. (CAMARILLO)

Robert Hutchman and Cortney Sadraie “Non-motor symptoms/ The right medication  (SANTA B ARBARA)

 Elizabeth Kirby DPT  “BALANCE and PD” (LIVE WIRES- DBS –BURBANK)

 Jack Chen, Pharm. D  “ Medications: Round Table/ Q& A ”  (CLAREMONT)

Marc Broberg, PT & Camille Torgenson “Keep Living, Laughing & Moving with Parkinson’s Disease” (VENTURA)

 On the website: Go to PD Educational Events for SEPTEMBER 2017

Please note: Due to the increase in computer viruses, we do not include a direct link to outside websites.  Please go to our website or click here: www.neurocommunity.org

PD Telephone at home: Go to www.parkinsons.va.gov for information.

PD Expert Briefing: Nutrition and Parkinson’s Disease

MF Fox Webinar: Keeping step with Parkinson’s: Balance, posture & gait.

LSVT: No webinar in September

——————————————————————————————————–

TNCF  ADDRESS:

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

32705 Vanowen St.  # 216

West Hills, CA  91307 ( mailing address only)

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is: www.neurocommunity.org or mail to our address below.

 Information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley. Click: contact or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study shows Horseback riding improves balance

Study Shows Therapeutic Horseback Riding (Hippotherapy) Improves Balance and More in People with MS

Source: http://www.nationalmssociety.org

SUMMARY

DETAILS
Background: Hippotherapy literally means “treatment with the help of the horse” from the Greek word “hippos,” meaning horse. This type of treatment uses a horse’s movements to achieve therapeutic goals. Physical therapists use hippotherapy to work on an individual’s balance and postural control; occupational therapists use it to work on fine motor control, attention and sensory integration; and speech-language therapists use the sessions to stimulate communication and cognitive skills.

The Study: In this study, 70 participants with MS and lower limb spasticity from five centers in Germany were randomly assigned to receive standard care plus one ½-hour session of hippotherapy per week, or just standard care, for 12 weeks. The primary outcome being measured was the effect on balance, and secondary outcomes included measures of fatigue, quality of life, pain and spasticity.

The results show that compared to the control group just receiving standard care, those who received hippotherapy plus standard care improved significantly in measures of balance, fatigue, spasticity and quality of life. Both groups experienced reductions in pain.
In terms of safety, one person in the hippotherapy group fell off the therapy horse but was able to continue the study. Two participants in the hippotherapy group experienced an MS relapse accompanied by painful muscle contractions.

The team (Vanessa Vermöhlen, University of Cologne, Germany, and colleagues) report their findings in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal (Published online August 3, 2017, available via Open Access).

Read more: Whether you enroll in an official therapeutic program or are just looking for venues in your community for access to horseback riding, the American Hippotherapy Association and the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship can provide information and resources.
COPY AND PASTE   www: momentummagazineonline.com  into your search engine       to read about “HORSE POWER”
 

 

 

Adding challenges to your stroke recovery

OLD: Stroke recovery = neuroplasticity + repetition + consistency

However, we never addressed the importance of challenge, which is another important factor of stroke recovery. So if you add it to that formula, it would look like this:

NEW: Stroke recovery = neuroplasticity + repetition +

consistency + challenge

But we feel like the word challenge can be pretty vague. So today we’re going to clarify exactly what healthy challenge feels like during stroke recovery.

Skills vs. Task Difficulty

In order to maximize your improvement during stroke rehabilitation, you want to strike a fine balance between skill and challenge.

Choose a task that you have enough skill to accomplish – yet you still find it challenging.

Challenge is essential during recovery because it helps stimulate your brain and initiate neuroplasticity, the first variable in our stroke recovery formula.

However, if a task is too challenging, you may not have the skill to accomplish it. Not only is this discouraging, but it will prevent your brain from having the opportunity to rewire itself.

It’s all about finding the perfect balance for you.

Challenge Looks Different for Everyone

Because every stroke is different, the right level of challenge will look different for everyone. So pay no attention to what your neighbor is doing.

Also, the level of challenge that you need will increase as you continue to improve. So it’s essential to constantly seek a higher level of challenge as you progress through your recovery.

For example, while therapy putty exercises might have helped your hands improve a lot during the early stages of recovery, it might not be challenging enough in the later stages; at which point you would need to step up your game.

Choose Better Therapy Options

During recovery, you will continue to improve as long as you’re incorporating high repetition and consistency into your regimen.

This means that as one form of therapy starts to feel easy, it’s important to move onto something more challenging.

So always try to choose forms of therapy that have various levels of difficulty. Because once you master one level, you can immediately progress to the next.

It will also help you save money because you won’t have to buy multiple therapy devices.

A great example is our FitMi home therapy system. FitMi comes with an Adaptive Challenge Algorithm that unlocks more difficult levels when you’re ready for them.

This keeps you constantly challenged – and you don’t even have to think about it!

Summary

Always remember to keep yourself challenged during recovery. This will maximize your progress because challenge helps stimulate neuroplasticity.

Don’t challenge yourself too much though, as it can undermine all your effort. Balance is key.

And now you have the complete formula for a successful recovery!

Stroke recovery = neuroplasticity + repetition + consistency + a good, healthy challenge

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Approach to challenging family members

Have a challenging Family member?? 

As a caregiver, remember the wise words of Albert Einstein

If your family member is challenging you and being stubborn, try a NEW approach.

SUCH AS:

— If they are not eating—   try making finger foods instead of a traditional meal with utensils…

–If a loved one refuses to bathe,  let an hour or two pass, then offer them an exchange.  If you take a shower, we’ll go out and get an ice cream cone.

–If you need a time out for yourself, arrange for your loved one to go to a senior center for day.   You might use a “geriatric fiblet”. Such as: Tell your loved one that you need to run errands, go to doctor for you annual physical exam, do some banking and go to the grocery store. It will mean getting in and out of the car at least 6 times. This is probably more times than your loved one would like to do.

The term “geriatric fiblet” was coined at the 2000 World Alzheimer’s Congress as “necessary white lies to redirect loved ones or discourage them from detrimental behavior.”

Fiblets are also used when you need some “time away from being a caregiver”.

-Give your family member a task to do on their own: such as folding clothes/towels, sorting papers, finding lids to empty containers, making a collage for your cousin, filing recipes, counting cards to see if there is a full deck, etc. Makes a person feel useful and independent.

— Set your cell phone alarm to go off every few hours.  Take a few minutes to make a call to a friend, set up a social event, go to the restroom, etc. Deep breaths will help too!

Remember- it does take a village.  Ask for help and support!

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

 For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

   23705 Vanowen St. # 216

   West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MS newly diagnosed at age 70

Diagnosed at 70; that’s good news!

By Connie from Arkansas

I always knew that if I lived long enough, I would become famous for something! I am the oldest living newly diagnosed person at two different MS clinics. I was diagnosed three years ago at age 70 in Denver, Colorado.

When my first symptoms appeared – slurring words, stumbling gait, and moving in slow motion – a mild stroke was the first suspicion. With this in mind, my family practitioner sent me to the hospital.

After two days of tests, the neurology team came into my room to bring me the grim news. I did not have a stroke. It was multiple sclerosis. I startled them by breathing a sigh of relief and then starting to laugh. I tried to explain that they had just told me that I did not have a stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, cancer, or congestive heart failure. I could handle multiple sclerosis!

Suddenly, a lot of physical occurrences over the last thirty to forty years started to make sense. I had experienced the blurred vision, stumbling, periods of extreme fatigue, and one bad episode in 1985 when my right side became numb.

I was fortunate in that I chose dietetics for my major in college, teaching me how to eat healthy foods and to exercise. After a skiing accident, which led to six surgeries and a lot of nuts and bolts in both legs, I started swimming laps and attending water aerobics classes. I truly believe that water aerobics is one of the reasons I am still in relatively good shape at the age of 73. It is a wonderful program for keeping your muscles flexible and keeping you moving without additional stress.

Interestingly, my arms became numb about two months after I stopped taking estrogen tablets. I had read that a woman with MS feels very good when she is pregnant, at which time her estrogen levels are raised. I consulted a doctor friend, and despite information about potential heart problems, I went back on a low dose of estrogen. Within two months, my arms were no longer numb.

As for the memory loss, at my age it is difficult to determine if the memory loss is due to the MS or just old age. Most of my friends have similar problems. I simply buy more yellow stickies! (Also known as “Post-it®,” notes, used to leave little reminders around the house.)

Of course, I do need to prepare for whatever is ahead of me. I purchased a one-level house with no steps anywhere. I have taken doors off, put in sliding doors, hanging pot racks, slide-out shelves, and have generally made the home wheelchair accessible. My theory is, “If I am ready, it won’t happen; if I’m not, it will.”

I relate to Teri Garr, her symptoms, and her outlook; her story has convinced me that I am on the right track. I keep my eye out for new adventures, I keep laughing, I cheer up my friends when they get a sympathetic look, and above all, I surround myself with upbeat people.

I truly feel that in spite of the MS, I am a survivor, and one of the lucky ones! My husband says, “You are easy to live with 98 percent of the time!” I have a doctor who tells me, “You are in really good shape for the shape you are in!” And I have three sons who simply call me, “One tough old broad.” It doesn’t get much better than that.

Editor’s note: Connie’s decision to stay on estrogen is based on her own, personal experience; MSAA does not promote any specific drug or treatment; readers are cautioned not to make any changes to their treatment regimens without consulting their physician.

Current clinical trials in California

 PD RESEARCH/TRIALS/STUDIES

CLICK on the CITY for detailed information

California

For detailed information on the following clinical trials, Copy and paste:   www.centerwatch.com/clinical.com  into your server and you will be taken to CenterWatch website

CLINICAL TRIALS by LOCATION

Garden Grove California 92845

Collaborative Neuro Science Network
Open Label Parkinson’s clinical research study

————————————–

Glendale California 91206

PAREXEL
Patients are needed to participate in a Phase 1 clinical research study evaluating a potential new treatment for Parkinson’s disease.

———————————-

Fountain Valley California 92708

A clinical trial to evaluate treatments using Amantadine ER Tablets and Placebo Tablets for patients with Parkinson’s Disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesias (LID)

——————————–

Fountain Valley California 92708-5153

A Phase 2 clinical study for patients with Parkinson’s Disease

———————————-

Fountain Valley California 92708

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study of Amantadine HCl ER (ALLAY-LID II) and Placebo to evaluate Parkinson’s disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesia (LID)

———————————————–

Fresno California 93710

A Phase 2 clinical study for patients with Parkinson’s disease

———————————————-

Irvine California

A clinical trial to evaluate treatments using Amantadine ER Tablets and Placebo Tablets for patients with Parkinson’s Disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesias (LID)

———————————————

Irvine California

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study of Amantadine HCl ER (ALLAY-LID II) and Placebo to evaluate Parkinson’s disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesia (LID)

————————————

La Jolla California 92037

A clinical study for patients with Parkinson’s Disease

————————————-

Los Angeles California 90048

A clinical trial seeking patients for a research study for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease (EPI-589)

———————————–

Los Angeles California 91403

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study for the treatment of All Diagnosed Health Conditions

——————————

Pasadena California

A clinical trial to evaluate treatments using Amantadine ER Tablets and Placebo Tablets for patients with Parkinson’s Disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesias (LID)

——————————

Pasadena California

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study of Amantadine HCl ER (ALLAY-LID II) and

Placebo to evaluate Parkinson’s Disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesia (LID)

—————————————-

Reseda California

A clinical trial to evaluate treatments using Amantadine ER Tablets and Placebo Tablets for patients with Parkinson’s Disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesias (LID)

—————————————–

San Diego California 92037

A clinical research study of BIIB054 and Placebo for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

————————————

San Francisco California 94115

A clinical trial seeking patients for a research study for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease (EPI-589)

———————————-

San Francisco California 94115

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study evaluating Activa PC+S for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease or Primary Dystonia

————————————-

San Francisco California 94121

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study of interventional MRI for implantation of DBS electrodes and DBS electrodes to evaluate Parkinson’s Disease or Dystonia

————————————-

Valencia California 91355

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study of Deep Brain Stimulation to evaluate Parkinson’s Disease

——————————————-

Ventura California

A clinical trial to evaluate treatments using Amantadine ER Tablets and Placebo Tablets for patients with Parkinson’s Disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesias (LID)

————————————————-

Ventura California

Patients are needed to participate in a clinical research study of Amantadine HCl ER (ALLAY-LID II) and Placebo to evaluate Parkinson’s disease or Levodopa Induced Dyskinesia (LID)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The power of Massage Therapy for Neurological conditions

THE WONDERS OF MASSAGE THERAPY

 

How can massage help with Neurological disorders?          Carole A. Feintech, LMT, BS, AMTA

There are those who are looking for another way to help with pain control. Numerous studies have shown massage stimulates the release of serotonin, a natural pain killing and mood elevating endorphin and reduces the level of cortisol, a stress hormone that produces pain.

Massage works hand in hand with neurology. Headache patients, who have exhausted all avenues, find regular massages are one of the only treatments that helps relieve them of daily pain or lesson the pain considerably. Deep muscle massage and Tissue Relaxation treatments have many benefits for patients with conditions like Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, Multiple Sclerosis, neuropathy or ABI to increase flexibility, reduce stress, improve circulation, reduce swelling and inflammation associated with lymphedema, generally create a release of toxins from the body and help increase energy.

We fail to realize how busy we are and we need to take 30 or 60 minutes a week to slow down and allow our bodies time to re-energize.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

Inspirations to make you smile

SEPTEMBER 2017 INSPIRATIONS

We are never too young or too old for ice cream! Eat dessert first… always.

 REMEMBER: That there is something inside of you that is greater than any obstacle. Sometimes, life begins anew, when we journey outside of our comfort zone.

 

What lies behind us and what lies before us are fairly inconsequential. What matters most is what lies inside of us.

 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:  

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

  23705 Vanowen St. # 216  West Hills, CA  91307

                                  

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Support us when you shop for back-to-school items.

Just Click Here and Shop

Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process