Gratitude Concert Free Nov 18 Music Mends Minds

Music Mends Minds is proud to present our free Gratitude Concert featuring the 5th Dementia Band, showcasing the Jazzanova Band, plus more surprises! NOV  18th  2017 

 

 FREE tickets found here: musicmendsmindsgc.eventbrite.com
Tickets required for admission. 
Start your Holiday Season singing and dancing in the aisles, witnessing thepower of music lifting spirits for all!

November Support Groups, Guest Speakers and Featured Articles

NOVEMBER NEWS from The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

DID YOU KNOW???

November 7th: International Tongue Twister Day. …  November 13th:             World Kindness Day —  November 15th: Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day          November 18th: Use less Stuff Day—November 19th: World Toilet Day

NOVEMBER IS NATIONAL CAREGIVER AWARENESS MONTH

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation: Phone: 818-745-5051

Visit our website: www.neurocommunity.org for specific information

Please note: To protect against viruses, we do not provide external links in our emails or on our website. We do provide you the website address! 

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Click green link here:   NOVEMBER PD SUPPORT GROUP LISTINGS

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REMEMBER: KEEP SCROLLING down on each page to locate all website posts.   Support groups  & Guest speakers are listed below!  

PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT TO THE NEUROCOMMUNITY FOUNDATION by making a donation today. Thank you so very much!

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NEW articles/ information posted on the website this month

PD and Dystonia (PD Interesting articles/research)

New Rules for everyday living & adding fun to your life Give it a TRY!  (Be Inspired)

It’s time to say thank you!  November is National CG Awareness month (Breaking news)

—-Grant programs and financial assistance (MS Wellness)   

 —-Helpful Hints for Grooming (Helpful Information)

Minimizing Stress during the Holidays (Wellness Therapies)  

–Soft robotic exosuits help patients walk after stroke (Stroke Education)

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NOVEMBER GUEST SPEAKERS  for PD Support Groups

CLICK on the SPEAKERS NAME ( GREEN)  for the link  to read about the guest speaker.

 Matt Wolff  LCSW – “Your Path to Greater Personal Empowerment”  (Claremont)

David Russak PT, DPT, BCIS, CSC- “What is Parkinson’s disease and how

do I fight it” (Westlake)   

Holly Sacks  –“Mindfulness and how it helps PD”-(Burbank)

Casey Halpern MD -“DBS-What’s on the Horizon?”  (Santa Barbara) 

Courtney Darrough  Katherine L. Mays, John Macias, Samantha Carnell“Caregiving around the Clock” (Ventura)

Captain Dave Zaniboni, Santa Barbara County Fire Dept. Public Information Officer- “Disaster Response Tactics for the Central Coast, including special needs emergency preparedness.​”

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PD EDUCATION FROM HOME

PD TELEPHONE: Information will be posted on our website when it becomes available.

MJ FOX  WEBINAR  

Topic: Fox Insight: Your Experience Fueling Research

Thursday, November 16, 2017  TIME:  9 a.m. PT

Discussion about the online study Fox Insight and how contributing data through surveys and genetic testing helps direct drug development and approvals.  The future of Parkinson’s research is in powerful hands: yours.

PD EXPERT BRIEFING  Topic: Depression and PD: Treatment Options,  Tuesday, November 21, 2017   

Time: 10:00 am PST 

 Roseanne D. Dobkin, Ph.D.,Associate Professor, Psychiatry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

LSVT:   No webinar in November

The NeuroCommunity Foundation   (818.745.5051)

32705 Vanowen St.  # 216   West Hills, CA  91307 (mailing address only)

Soft robotic exosuits help patients walk after stroke

Soft robotic exosuits help patients walk after stroke

Published Monday 31 July 2017  Article: A soft robotic exosuit improves walking in patients after stroke, Louis N. Awad et al., Science Translational Medicine, doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aai9084, published 26 July 2017.

Adapted Media Release

Scientists have created lightweight and low-profile soft robotic ankle supports that could help stroke patients walk with less difficulty and more normal strides. More than 7 million Americans are stroke survivors, and a vast majority of affected individuals never fully recover the ability to walk.

Recent advances in robotic technologies have shown promise for walking rehabilitation, but most assistive exosuits are rigid, bulky contraptions that are impractical for people to wear during everyday activities. In search of a better alternative, Louis Awad and colleagues developed a soft robotic ankle-support system weighing 0.9 kg (roughly twice as heavy as a soccer ball) to be worn on one side of the body.

Over two days of testing, nine subjects ranging from 30 to 67 years old who were undergoing rehabilitation after strokes all showed more efficient and less asymmetrical strides when wearing the device, both when walking tethered on a treadmill and over open ground. What’s more, the researchers observed the most pronounced improvements among the individuals who had the slowest unassisted walking speeds.

Their system consists of a close-fitting waist belt and leg straps connected to a calf sleeve where small robotic actuators exerted force on a shoe insole – helping to provide forward propulsion and correct problems with ankle dorsiflexion (commonly referred to as “drop foot,” which affects roughly 20% of stroke survivors).

Parkinsons Education at Home

PD EDUCATION FROM HOME

MJ FOX WEBINAR 

Topic: Fox Insight: Your Experience Fueling Research

Thursday, November 16, 2017  TIME:  9 a.m. – 10:00 am 

Discussion about the online study Fox Insight and how contributing data through surveys and genetic testing helps direct drug development and approvals.  The future of Parkinson’s research is in powerful hands: yours.

To Register: Go to  www.michaeljfox.org/understanding-parkinsons/webinar-registration

PD EXPERT BRIEFING 

Topic: Depression and PD: Treatment Options,

Tuesday, November 21, 2017   Time: : 10:00 am  ( PST)

Roseanne D. Dobkin, Ph.D.,Associate Professor, Psychiatry, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

PD TELEPHONE AT HOME 

When:     2nd Tuesday of every month        10:00 – 11:00 am PT

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14th TOPIC:   PD Research Updates

SPEAKER:   Sarah Pirio-Richardson, MD, Movement Disorders Physician at the New Mexico VA HCS, SW PADRECC Consortium Center

AUDIENCE:  For Veterans and their families!

To listen: Call-in:  1-800-767-1750  and enter the Code:  54321#   (call in about 3 min prior to the hour)

LSVT:   No webinar in November

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:  

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation   23705 Vanowen St. # 216   West Hills, CA 91307

21 Practical Tips for Grooming and Bathing

 

21 Tips for Grooming and Bathing for persons with PD 

from: Parkinsons’s News Today 2017

As a person’s Parkinson’s disease progresses, simple everyday tasks such as washing, grooming and going to the bathroom can become difficult due to typical Parkinson’s symptoms such as tremors or rigidity. Those living with the disease will be keen to do as much for themselves as possible and retain as much of their independence as they can, particularly when it comes to personal hygiene.

We’ve put together a list of handy tips to help people living with Parkinson’s continue to wash, groom and go to the bathroom easily and safely using information from the National Parkinsons Foundation.

Washing

  • Installing at least two fitted handrails near the bath or shower will allow the patient to grab hold of something safe and secure while getting in and out of the bath or shower. These should be professionally fitted if possible to ensure they are strong enough to support the patient’s weight.
  • A chair or bench in the shower or bathtub will help those who have trouble balancing while standing. A handheld showerhead is best used in these circumstances.
  • Make sure the water isn’t too hot.
  • Place non-slip rubber mats in the bath tub and shower cubicle.
  • Bath rugs and mats should have a rubber backing so they don’t slide across tiles.
  • Liquid soap in a pump dispenser is safer to use than hard bars of soap which can slip out of hands and leave slippery residue underfoot.
  • Install a shelf in the shower or bath area that is between knee and shoulder height for easy access to soap, shampoo, and other essential washing items.
  • Advise the patient to always take their cell phone or medical alert device into the bathroom if they’re home alone.

Grooming

  • Patients should sit down when brushing their teeth, shaving, applying makeup or drying their hair so they don’t have to worry about balance.
  • It’s important to support the upper body by resting elbows on the sink or vanity when grooming.
  • Electric devices are often better and safer to use than non-electric ones, such as toothbrushes and shavers.
  • Hands-free hair dryers can be mounted on a vanity unit.

Going to the bathroom and incontinence

  • Toilet frames or grab bars will help patients get up off the toilet safely.
  • Introduce a regular schedule for visiting the bathroom, such as every two hours or before meals.
  • Avoid drinking caffeinated drinks which may cause more frequent bathroom visits.
  • Try to avoid fluids two hours before bed.
  • Patients should use a nightlight or keep the bathroom light on during the night so they can make their way to the bathroom safely.
  • It’s advised that those with Parkinson’s attempt to fully empty their bladder each time they visit the bathroom.
  • If patients become prone to bathroom accidents, they should try using incontinence products such as pads or padded underwear.
  • Patients should seek medical advice if they experience burning or a sudden increase in frequency or urgency to urinate as this may indicate a urinary tract infection.
  • A urologist can help if patients are experiencing problems with incontinence.

Parkinsons’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

Could you be eligible for a grant from the MS Foundation

FROM MS Foundation/ MS FOCUS

Did you know that you or your loved one might be eligible for a grant/ financial assistance through the MS Foundation: Grants & Programs?

Go to: https://msfocus.org/Get-Help/MSF-Programs-Grant, OR call National Toll-Free Helpline at 888-MS Focus (888-673-6287), OR EMAIL: email support@msfocus.org. to complete and submit your application .

Grants and Programs include:

Emergency Assistance Program

Health and Wellness Grant

Healthcare Assistance Grant

Homecare Assistance Grant

Assistive Technology Program

Computer Program

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

Minimize your Stress Level this Holiday Season

 

 

Minimize Stress during the upcoming Holiday Season!

What  you and your caregivers can do to minimize this stress and have at least a chance at enjoying the holidays?

  1. Put first things first. If you’ve always felt depressed during the holidays, caregiving won’t make things easier. If you get depressed from the lack of sunlight in the winter months, see your doctor. There are therapies that can help this syndrome, which is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). If you don’t have a problem with the sunlight, but still suffer seasonal depression, talking with a counselor to learn to cope with this depression is often a good idea.
  2. If you have always enjoyed the holidays, but now find them overwhelming because of too many demands on your time, you will need to learn to simplify the season. Yes, that will mean disappointing a few people, perhaps elders and children alike, but simplification is often the only choice you have, if you are to remain somewhat sane.
  3. Learn to detach from the negative feedback you may get from others because of changes you are making. Detaching simply means that you recognize the other person’s feelings, but you will not allow yourself to react or be controlled by their feelings without considering your own needs, as well. You set boundaries by telling others what you can and can’t do. You look at the situation with open eyes, perhaps get some feedback from people you think can help you, and then make your own decisions. Acknowledging your loved ones’ views, and telling them you love them, but simply can’t do it all, generally helps. If your mom says, “But we’ve always done it that way,” you say, “Yes, we have, but now our holiday has to change a little, since our lives have changed.” If your kids lay on the guilt because you can’t bake every kind of cookie they want, let them know that you want to please them, but that your time is limited now, so they can help you by being flexible. If you offer to let them help you, they may feel part of the decision, rather than brushed off. The main idea is that you don’t react to their negativity. Generally, when you stop reacting, other people will calm down.
  4. Use music as a soothing tool for all. If you have elders in nursing homes, bring them a CD player and CDs so they can play old songs they enjoy. Around the house, play Christmas tunes your kids like, but don’t forget your own needs. If you have some favorite holiday tunes on CDs, play those too. However, if you get a sick feeling every time you enter a mall because the Holiday music reminds you of all you have to do, then play other types of music at home. Do consider music of some kind. Classical music can be very therapeutic, religious music helps many, and old rock and roll or country songs may give you a boost.
  5. Soothing light can help most people relax. Obviously, candles aren’t allowed in nursing homes and likely aren’t a good idea for elders or kids. But there are many softly lit holiday decorations you can safely use, or get some indirect lamps for atmosphere. Soft lights, combined with good music, can help calm nearly anyone, including a caregiver. Try it while you bake treats, decorate your home or the elders’ homes, or do other holiday duties.
  6. Meditation can be as simple as getting up early or going to bed late. The idea is to have some quiet time for yourself. Some people like guided meditation, where music or soothing words on CD or DVD help them relax in a progressive manner. Other people prefer going outside, maybe to a park or sitting near water, if possible, to enjoy natural calm. Some folks concentrate on their breathing pattern while they repeat one soothing word. This helps them calm their overactive brain. There’s no right or wrong way to meditate, but numerous studies have shown mediation can have a healthy effect on mood, as well as physical wellbeing. Also, try to eat right and exercise. This is extra hard during the holiday season, but you can feel better if you treat your body right.
  7. Ask your spouse, a friend or relative to take over some of your duties for a time. It’s amazing how many of us think we have to do everything ourselves, even though others would help if we only asked them. When we don’t ask for help, people often don’t know we need help, or else they simply don’t know what to do.
  8. Take a trip down memory lane. Remember your parents when they were young and healthy. Remember your children when they were tiny. Remember the good times before these difficult times. When you do that, you’ll likely find a better balance in your life, because you’ll start to recognize that life is cyclical, and better times will come again.
  9. Allow yourself to feel the pain of your aging parents’ losses. As my elders aged and grew frail, I was deeply saddened by their physical and psychological pain. The holidays threw a spotlight on all the things they could no longer enjoy. This pain is real. Allow yourself to feel it. Write it down. Talk about it with other caregivers, a religious leader, or a good friend. Get it out. It’s natural, human and okay to feel the loss. If you feel bitter or angry, say so. Get it all out and don’t allow shame to enter into the equation. You have a right to all of your feelings.
  10. Let go of perfection. It’s likely that all of those holidays you remember as being so wonderful really weren’t that perfect. Every human being looks at events differently. Time skews our memories. Life wasn’t perfect thirty years ago, twenty years ago or ten years ago. It’s far from perfect now. Do your best with what you have. Take care of yourself along with the others, and your holidays will be as good as they can be. Let that be good enough.

-adapted from article written by Carol Bradley Bursack, Editor in chief, Elderlink

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address:   

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

  West Hills, CA 91307

 

A Thank You to all Caregivers November is Caregiver Awareness Month

 

National Family Caregiver Awareness Month 

November is National Family Caregiver Awareness Month  because most care actually takes place in the home, not in medical or assisted living facilities.

National Family Caregiver Awareness Month is recognized as a time to spotlight family caregivers. The NeuroCommunity Foundation invites caregivers/care partners to share their stories and in the process let others know that they are not alone on their journey. We also welcome and encourage “tribute messages” to honor a special caregiver or care partner in your life and let them know they are appreciated. Please write your message in the “Speak your Mind” box at the end of this article.

The National Alliance for Caregiving is a a non-profit coalition of over 50 national organizations focused on family caregiving – working together for a healthier America. Caregiving touches almost every family and in very different ways – different health conditions; different situations; even different cultures. Understanding the family caregiver and what they need to be successful is why the Alliance has been serving America’s nearly 66 million family caregivers since 1996.

Who can be a caregiver? A caregiver or care partner can be a son, a wife, a granddaughter, a nephew, a grandfather, a friend, a neighbor, or even an entire family.

How can you give recognition to a caregiver for National Family Caregiver Awareness Month?

  • Offer a few hours of respite time so they can spend time with friends, or simply relax.
  • Send a card of appreciation or a bouquet of flowers to brighten their day.
  • Encourage local businesses to offer a free service for family caregivers in November.
  • Help a family caregiver decorate their home for the holidays or offer to address envelopes for their holiday cards.
  • Offer comic relief! Give a family caregiver your favorite funny movie to view, or provide them with a book on tape.
  • Invite them to Thanksgiving dinner so they can just relax and enjoy the holiday.
  • Encourage your faith community to ask for prayers not only for those who are ill, but also those who care for them.
  • Help a family caregiver find new educational materials and support through local community web sites or by calling local social service agencies for help.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org   

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                  23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                    West Hills, CA 91307

Parkinson’s disease and Dystonia

Dystonia and Parkinson’s Disease

Have you ever experienced a painful cramped foot or curled, clenched toes as part of life with Parkinson’s? These symptoms can often be a tell-tale sign of dystonia — sustained and often painful muscle twisting, spasms and cramps. Dystonia can be an early symptom of PD, or it can develop later, as a side effect of levodopa.

People with Parkinson’s commonly experience dystonia as a cramp in the foot that causes the toes to curl and stay clenched. In fact, in some people, a foot dystonia induced by walking or running may be one of the very first signs of the illness.

More commonly people who are being treated for PD complain of painful dystonia of the foot on the more severely affected side. This painful cramp usually goes away after the first dose of PD medications. Less commonly in treated patients, dystonia can affect other body parts and come and go throughout the day.

Dystonia can affect other parts of the body too. It causes forceful twisting movements that, for example, can draw a person’s arm behind their back, or pull the head to the side or toward the chest. These movements are different from the flowing, writhing movements of dyskinesia, which are not painful.

Although people with PD sometimes have dystonia, it also is its own movement disorder — people can have dystonia without having PD. Whether dystonia is part of PD or not, it is caused by changes in an area of the brain called the basal ganglia, and is often treated with the same medications.

Common Symptoms

Pain. The twisting and cramping of muscles in dystonia are among the most painful symptoms experienced by people with PD.

Parts of the body affected by dystonia:

Arms, hands, legs and feet: involuntary movements and spasms.

Neck: may twist uncomfortably, causing the head to be pulled down, or to one side. This is called cervical dystonia or spasmodic torticollis.

Eyes: muscles around the eyes may squeeze involuntarily, leading a person to blink too much or to have difficulty opening the eyes.

Vocal cords and swallowing muscles: a person’s voice may sound strangled, hoarse or breathy.

Face and jaw: the jaw may open or close forcefully or there may be grimacing of the face.

[Read more…]

Give it a try

SOME NEW “RULES” TO LIVE BY EVERYDAY!  GIVE IT A TRY!

BY Lori Deschene, founder of “Tiny Buddha”

I once read that intelligent people are never bored because they’re always curious. You’re smart—start exploring! If you keep your mind engaged and fresh during your downtime, you’ll have far more passion and focus when it’s time to get productive. And equally important, you’ll enjoy more of the minutes that would otherwise just pass by.

  1. Start the day with a blank piece of paper and the question: “What if today were my last?”

Write down what you’d do differently and then try to do at least five of those things.

  1. Wear something much bolder than you usually do.

This gives people the opportunity to see you in a new light, which means they may interact with you differently.

  1. Take a different path when you walk to work.

Maybe you’ll pass a restaurant you’d like to try sometime or a gym that’s offering free classes.

  1. If you drive, park your car a mile away and take the bus the rest of the way.

I did this one time and met a man on the bus who I dated for a month. Well worth the detour!

  1. If you take public transportation for your commute, make the time meditative or educational.

[Read more…]

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Support us when you shop for back-to-school items.

Just Click Here and Shop

Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process