July News from The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 

JULY NEWS from The NeuroCommunity Foundation

FEEL FREE TO CALL US: PHONE NUMBER: 818-745-5051

Visit our website to find all detailed information about educational events, speakers, support groups and more!  www.neurocommunity.org

REMEMBER: when you visit our website for information, KEEP SCROLLING down on each page to locate all website posts.  Several NEW articles may be posted under the same heading. The one you are looking for may not always be the first post!  Each listing below will have where, on our website, you may find detailed information, articles, etc. 

On the website:

WELLNESS : How to breath efficiently during our hot summer

CAREGIVING:  A MUST read for all caregivers. Takes only 20 seconds

STROKE   Stroke recovery-Tips for the Caregiver

MS:  Spanish  and English speaking MS Support groups in Tarzana . Additional MS Support groups.

TBI   Cognitive TBI Support group for Burbank; TBI research study at UCLA focus on children 

PD     Current research

BE INSPIRED:   How humor can be therapeutic for everyone

HELPFUL INFORMATION   Smart and Savvy Travel Tips; Where to donate Durable Medical Equipment for PD, MS, Stroke and TBI patients and families.

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS: CSUN interns and Music Mends Minds.

 NEW: PD Support Group in Lompoc- see PD Support Group listing.


 JULY 2017 SUPPORT GROUP LISTINGS  

CLICK ON THE ABOVE COLORED LINK TO be taken directly to the PD Support group listing for July

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GUEST SPEAKERS for JULY:   Click on the colored link below for detailed information about the speaker and topic!! 

Dr. Hutchman and Cortney Sadraie, “Non motor symptoms/ The right medication (WESTLAKE)

TARA TAMADDON MPH, RD-E Dietitian  “NUTRITION AND WELLNESS IN PD (STUDIO CITY)

 Understanding DUOPA :  Duopa medication system: The what, why and how. Speaker: Duopa RN Nurse and patient testimonial ( BURBANK and CAMARILLO)

Research Update by MJFox Foundation,    Jocelyn Scherr,MJF Foundation  (VENTURA)

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Telephone/ Webinar and Online PD Educational Events

For detailed information about the July webinars, please visit our website in the PD Educational Events section!

JULY TOPICS

PD TELEPHONE AT HOME : Speech and Swallowing

LSVT:   No webinar in July.

PD EXPERT BRIEFING: No webinar in July.

MJ Fox Webinar :  Drug Re-purposing: Testing a Drug Approved for One Disease for its Efficacy in Another

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, click: contact us here  or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to  support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark :www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MS Support Groups Tarzana -Simi Valley-Santa Clarita

MS SUPPORT GROUPS

Here are 3 MS Support groups  you might not know about!

Cornerstone Church 

2080 Winifred St.  Simi Valley, CA 93063

11:00 AM – 1:00 PM    ongoing

First Monday of the Month

Please call before attending a meeting to confirm time and location.

Contact information

Dennis Zurcher     dczurcher@sbcglobal.net
805-584-2526

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Tarzana Community & Cultural Center
19130 Ventura Blvd.
Tarzana, CA 91356

Ongoing

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Second Saturday of the Month

Please call before attending a meeting to confirm time and location.

Contact information

Maria De Orellana
cyt1709@aol.com
818-370-8073


Saint Kateri Catholic Church  

22508 Copper Hill Dr.
Santa Clarita, CA 91350

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

ongoing

Second Thursday of the Month

Please call before attending a meeting to confirm time and location.

Contact information

Eire Garcia, Group Leader
emlina6@cs.com
661-297-6887

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease,  MS and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Say yes to traveling this summer with these savvy tips

Don’t delay!! Make those summer travel plans now!

Here are some tips for making traveling easier for you.

Your difficulties do not have to interfere with traveling, which should be an enjoyable experience and not limited or avoided because of you or your loved one’s disease. But planning ahead is key to avoid these difficulties. The following guidelines should help to make your next trip anxiety-free.

Tips for Traveling with a movement disorder 

Always try to travel with a companion.

  • Place the names of your doctor, insurance company, emergency contact, and medications in your wallet or purse.
  • Carry identification stating that you have a neurological disease.
  • Use a “fanny” pack or backpack so that you have both hands free to balance as you walk, especially if walking any distance.
  • Pack snacks and carry a water bottle to take medications.
  • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing and good walking shoes.
  • When making hotel reservations, request a room on the ground floor or near an elevator. Ask if they have rooms that are handicapped-accessible; these usually include grab bars in the shower and bathroom and have wider spaces between furniture for wheelchair access.

Traveling With Medications

  • Always have at least a day’s dosage of medication in your pocket or purse.
  • Try to carry all of your medications with you, in the event that your luggage gets misplaced.
  • Pack enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Do not rely on out-of-town, or especially out-of-the-country, pharmacies for refills.
  • Check with your doctor about any over-the-counter drugs, such as those for motion sickness or diarrhea, before you leave.
  • Find out if your medications are “sun-sensitive” and plan accordingly.
  • Carry a list and schedule of medications with you.
  • If possible, use a watch with an alarm or an alarm pillbox. If you are traveling with time changes it may be difficult for you to remember on your own.

Travel by Car

  • Many medications can cause drowsiness, particularly after eating. If you are driving, take a nap before you go and avoid eating for two to three hours before departing.
  • Do not overestimate you abilities. While you may be capable of driving short distances to and from home, a longer road trip may require much more stamina. Either break the trip up into shorter distances with frequent stops, or share the driving with someone else.

Travel by Air

  • Request a non-stop flight and an aisle seat.
  • Check as many bags as possible, but remember to keep your medications in your carry-on.
  • Use airport shuttles, or ask for a wheelchair if your gate is a far distance.
  • Ask for early seating for a few extra minutes to board and get comfortable.
  • Use the bathroom before you get on the plane. Airplane bathrooms are often small and not handicapped-accessible.
  • If you are on a restricted diet, request a special meal in advance.

Travel by Bus or Train

  • Wheelchair lifts are generally available for entrances and exits.
  • Seats can generally be removed to accommodate wheelchairs.
  • Try to get an aisle seat near the exit to make getting on and off easier.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, research and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBI research study in children at local medical center

Wanted for Brain Imaging Research

Research study for Children with Recent Traumatic Brain Injuries

UCLA Division of Child Psychiatry

Children with Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) frequently experience problems with various mental and cognitive functions in the months following an injury.

Most children show substantial recovery in these functions during
the course of the first year following a TBI.

This National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded UCLA study
examines the brain processes associated with recovery of cognitive functions, such as attention, learning,memory, and problem solving following a TBI in children and adolescents.

Eligible patients must be between 8 and 18 years old, speak English, have good vision without glasses (contacts are OK), and have experienced a moderate to severe TBI within approximately the last 2-4 months.

Participants will undergo the following procedures twice within the span of one year:
 Two brain imaging exams (MRI), lasting less than 1 hour each
 Behavioral assessments of learning, memory and problem-solving skills, lasting  approximately 3 hours

For more information, contact:
Leila Molina, MA
310-825-0443
lmolina@mednet.ucla.edu

Interested families and patients will be asked to participate in a brief phone interview designed to determine if a child or adolescent is eligible to participate. Participants may earn up to $300 by enrolling in the study and will receive free brain imaging exams (MRI) and a free neuropsychological evaluation with a clinical report to help with diagnostic clarification, treatment planning, and/or educational planning purposes. Reimbursements for travel expenses and lunch will also be arranged.

This study is being conducted by Robert Asarnow, PhD
48-240C UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Therapeutic Humor promotes wellness

What is therapeutic humor?

Therapeutic humor is any intervention that promotes health and wellness by stimulating a playful discovery, expression or appreciation of the absurdity or incongruity of life’s situations.

This intervention may enhance work performance, support learning, improve health, or be used as a complementary treatment of illness to facilitate healing or coping, whether physical, emotional, cognitive, social or spiritual.

Laughter is the power of positive healing,” she said. “I’ve seen it work best for people with losses – death, divorce, a job, for example. Humor is a tool to empower people to move forward. It helps them improve their quality of life, to take better care of themselves.”

“A belly laugh increases the ability of your immune system to fight infections,” said Elizabeth Taylor, on the faculty of Bastyr University, the Seattle-area institution devoted to natural medicine.

Tip to Relieve Stress and Be Happier   by Roberta Gold, Laughter for the Health  of it. Los Angeles based Recreation Therapist and Humor Therapist

Don’t look at the news headlines first thing in the morning.  Don’t watch the news right before going to bed.  Instead think of something you really enjoyed doing during the day.  Make that your last thought before you go to bed.

There are so many benefits you can receive from laughing more. Relieve your stress, improve immunity and even tone up your abs.

Roberta belongs to an organization called AATH.org  – The Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor.  Visit their website to find research, books and articles about humor and humor therapy.

If more people listened to the comedy channel on the radio when they’re in their cars, there would be much less road rage.You can lower your cortisol levels (the hormone that may be making you fat) by simply laughing, even if you start with a fake laugh.  Your body doesn’t differentiate between a real laugh and a fake one.  When you’re feeling you’re lowest, force yourself to laugh.

When you get hit with intense “stuff” turn to gratitude. It will make it easier for you to laugh and feel better.  Write down what you’re grateful for in a notebook. (Writing in long hand will give you the best results)

Write a “to do” list and cross off something you’ve accomplished each day. When you cross off an accomplishment, or write a gratitude list, it will make you feel happier.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease, Stroke, TBI and MS – other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Research information for PD

PD Research news. Click on the colored link to take you there directly. 

Parkinson’s News Today: Researchers Discover Why Deep Brain Stimulation Causes Weight Gain in Parkinson’s Patients

Parkinson’s News Today: “Is Parkinson’s Disease Triggered by a Protein in the Stomach?”

Parkinson’s News Today: “Computer Games Under Study as Non-Drug Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s News Today: “New Microsoft Watch Can Quiet Parkinson’s Tremors

Parkinson’s News Today: “Biomarkers for Predicting Cognitive Decline in Parkinson’s Disease May Improve Future Clinical Trials

Parkinson’s News Today: “APDA Partners with Smart Patients to Support Parkinson’s Online Community

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stroke recovery for the caregiver of a survivor

Stroke Recovery: Tips for the Caregiver

By Brenda Conaway from WebMD archives

If you are caring for a stroke survivor, you may have a lot of questions about whether your loved one will recover and what his or her needs will be in the months and years ahead. You may also worry about how you will manage in your new role.

“Caregiving can be a big load to shoulder,” says Maggie Fermental, RN, a stroke nurse at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Formerly an OR nurse, Fermental suffered a stroke at the age of 31 from a fall while ice skating. She now counsels stroke survivors and their families. “Not only do caregivers continue to fulfill their role in the family, they also have to care for the survivor and take on that person’s role as well,” Fermental says. “It can be overwhelming.”

In the U.S., more than 50 million people provide care for a loved one with a disability or illness. Anywhere from 59% to 75% of caregivers are women, and most are caring for an older parent. Yet despite the challenges of caregiving, many people report that they appreciate life more and feel positive about being able to help.

Look into insurance coverage and assess your finances. Medicare and/or health insurance will cover most of the hospitalization and rehabilitation expenses. However, there may be restrictions on which facilities and providers are covered. So be sure to find out exactly what is covered and what out-of-pocket payments may be needed. Also remember that as your loved one gains abilities or is no longer progressing, coverage may change or stop. The hospital’s social service department or a case manager can help you negotiate the often complex world of insurance and explore other options should you need additional aid.

Participate in stroke rehabilitation. Attend a few therapy sessions so that you can support your loved one during stroke recovery. Encourage the stroke survivor to practice new skills, but don’t always jump in to help. “Don’t do too much,” Fermental says. “Be supportive, and allow survivors to do things for themselves.” Even small accomplishments will help your loved one become more self-reliant and confident.

Assess your loved one’s needs as well as your ability to meet them. The stroke survivor’s health care team can help you determine what kind of help will be needed. Caregivers often need to:

Focus on your physical health. Don’t ignore minor health concerns, and be sure to get regularly scheduled checkups and health exams. Learn healthy ways to manage stress and relax. Eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and getting enough sleep will help you keep up your strength.

Focus on your emotional health. Allow yourself to feel frustrated, angry, and sad, and share it with someone other than your loved one. These feeling are normal, and in order to not dwell on them, you need to express them. This is where friends and support groups can play an important role.

Studies show that caregivers are also at risk for depression, especially if the survivor has dementia. Depression responds well to treatment, so talk with your doctor if you think you may be depressed.

Get Support. To find a support group near you, call your local hospital or do an online search for “caregiver support.” You can find online support groups as well as local meetings in your area. Talking with other caregivers can help you feel less alone and provide an opportunity to share resources and caregiving tips.

Remember to laugh. Humor can be your best defense against difficult situations and feelings. You are carrying a heavy load and deserve to laugh and feel joy, so it’s important to remain open to the good things life has to offer.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where to Donate Durable Medical Equipment

The Durable Medical Equipment Aid center

If you or someone you knows would like to donate durable medical equipment that you no longer use or need, here is a SFV organization that will repair, clean and give the equipment to someone in the community who really needs it.. at no charge!

They will even pick your items!!

It is a non-profit organization:

The Durable Medical Equipment Aid

www.thedme.org

19528 Ventura Blvd  # 430

Tarzana, Ca 91356

818 298-9893

Ask for Nilo. She is the owner and director. Please let Nilo know that you received the information from The NeuroCommunity Foundation.  Thank you.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laughter makes it better sometimes

KEEP SCROLLING TO SEE ALL THE CARTOONS

‘It’s going to take me ten hours to read your care instructions and your insurance only covers an hour of care.’

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Community Connections

Image result for photo of community connections and resources

We all know that it does take a village to ensure a healthier, stronger and more educated community. The NeuroCommunity Foundation is proud to join with like-minded schools and non-profit organizations that share our commitment to being a responsible and dedicated community partner for those suffering from the disabling effects of Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury.

Our community connections:

California State University, Northridge

For several years, The NeuroCommunity Foundation and the Public Health Program  and Health Administration Program at CSUN have been working together to provide valuable internship opportunities for students.  We have worked with graduate and undergraduate students nearly each semester.

For the student, their internship provides the opportunity to gain real-life experience, develop skills, make connections and learn about neurological diseases as they begin their passageway into the field of health education and administration.  The NeuroCommunity Foundation receives fresh ideas, new perspectives and an opportunity to increase our presence in social media.

Music Mends Minds -Restoring the Rhythm of Life 

This spectacular program has classes in Studio City and in West Los Angeles. The 5th Dementia band performs numerous times during the year to raise awareness about ” the power of music” to improve our lives. All concert dates are posted on our website!

Researchers Find Music is Powerful Medicine

Medical researchers today are finding that music is powerful medicine. Considered the “new frontier” for treating and managing the symptoms of neurological/psychological disorders, Music Mends Minds (MMM) is an innovative,    new non profit at the forefront of this organic movement, utilizing music to lift spirits, change brain chemistry and improve the lives of patients with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia or neurological disease, PTSD and traumatic brain injury through the healing power of music.

An area of scientific inquiry that has begun to garner the attention of the medical community, Neuro-scientists have made enormous breakthroughs in understanding how our brains work by monitoring them in real time.  Music memories seem to be stored and accessed differently than our “declarative” or event-specific memories. Even individuals with cognitive and memory deficits find their musical memories are intact.

Tasks such as reading or doing math problems or crosswords, activities often recommended in maintaining mental  acuity as we age, each have corresponding areas of the brain where activity can be observed.  But when researchers got the participants to listen to music, they saw fireworks.  And playing music is the brain’s equivalent of a full-body workout, engaging practically every area of the brain at once—including sensory and motor skill areas, as well as auditory, visual and cognitive centers. Simultaneously, it releases such neurotransmitters as dopamine, involved in learning, movement control and mood.

By engaging multiple brain circuits, with a focus on skill improvement and coordination with other musicians, it is believed that the circuitry in the brain can be maintained — even rescued or rewired — through the formation of new connections.

MMM fosters the development of therapeutic bands comprised of cognitively impaired musicians, including those who just sing along or shake a tambourine. By introducing young music students to the program — who also benefit tremendously from the wisdom, experience and spirit of their seasoned partners —MMM creates a positive, cross-generational impact and provides a joyful alternative to seniors’ social isolation. Bringing together musicians, students,family, caregivers and friends to make music builds connections; promotes “aging in place” (in the home); and helps to reduce symptoms, disease-related stress and associated costs of health care.

Additionally, MMM bands offer an opportunity to the entire community to come together to enjoy the music and de-stigmatize these isolating diagnoses.

MMM was founded by Los Angeles-based retiree Carol Rosenstein, 72. Through a personal ad in 1985, Carol (a former chiropractor and clinical nutritionist) found Irwin (a former, high-profile corporate attorney, who also helped establish low-income government housing in California, serving as Chief Counsel for the launch of the state’s HUD office), whom she calls her “Prince Charming.”

When Irwin, now 81, received the devastating diagnosis of Parkinson’s in 2006 and related dementia three years later,

the tireless Carol eventually found a way to not only improve their lives but those of others. Enrolling Irwin in UCLA’s Alzheimer’s and Dementia Patient Care program in 2014, he began playing the piano at the facility … and something miraculous happened.  Within weeks, it was clear that playing music empowered Irwin, who became more aware,responsive, confident, energetic, talkative and hopeful. And so, she formed MMM’s inaugural band, The 5th Dementia.

Recalls Carol of their 11-year journey, “I feel so blessed to have my buddy back and a quality of life that was missing in our home for a very long time. Ours was a love story that I thought was over, but now continues … just to a little different beat. Playing music creates such excitement that it alters the chemistry of the brain and not only mends minds, but families and relationships and I want to share that medicine with others.”

Today, new bands are being formed across the nation (even one in the Philippines) by people who have been inspired by MMM’s story; as service projects with Rotary International clubs as part of their community outreach; and in conjunction with such other organizations as the Department of Veterans Affairs through its Home for Heroes program, which launched The Band of Heroes in Los Angeles.

Want to know more?  Contact Carol Rosenstein at Info@MusicMendsMinds.org or visit MMM online at www.MusicMendsMinds.org

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

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Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process