Playing golf will help will your parkinson’s symptoms

Playing golf: A story of one man’s enlightening moment:

If you happen to lose track of Gary Smith, there’s a good chance you’ll find him at Top Golf. He hits there for an hour a day.

“No one really knows I have Parkinson’s due to all the golfing I’m doing,” said Smith, 61, who was diagnosed in 2008. Smith was fighting fatigue and felt gravity literally pulling his body downward.

“When I walked my daughters down the aisle, you see a real stiff man,” recalled Smith. “You see me shuffling and I didn’t know it.”

Smith was finding it more difficult to control his movements because of the changes happening in his brain. Doctors told him exercise would help.

“I did marathons, triathlons, yoga, chased my wife around the house, hip hop, biking, boxing. Nothing really changed until I started golfing,” said Smith.

“Golf involves a very precise balance between mobility and stability and a combination of fine motor skills and gross motor skills,” said Dr. Martha McGraw, movement disorders specialist at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital. “Using those in a complex manner would certainly benefit brain function.”

Dr. McGraw said exercise in general not only helps people with Parkinson’s Disease—but reduces your risk for it because it helps the brain to repair and rebuild damaged networks, improves your brain’s ability to adapt, and protects against further damage.

“Next thing I knew, within a month I was feeling back to normal,” said Smith. “I feel like I’m back to my old self. I feel younger than I did probably in my 50s!”

Even his neurologist agreed.

“He’s had a dramatic improvement over the past six months or so since he’s become active with his golf program,” said Dr. McGraw.

It’s important to note each body is different. Smith’s just happens to enjoy and respond to this particular “par”-scription. Without changing his medications or dosages, he’s struggling less and feeling better than he has in years.

“[Golf has] changed me and I believe with all my heart that if someone tried it for a month — three or four times a week — they would feel a difference,” said Smith.

To date, there are no specific scientific studies that indicate golf is good for people with Parkinson’s Disease. Neurologists we spoke with say as a form of exercise they do support it. The physical benefit plus social aspect of the game enhances a patient’s well-being.

When Gary Smith was first diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, his reaction was fairly typical.

“I was angry with God,” he says. “After I railed at him for a while, I felt like he was saying, “Are you done now? I’ve got plans for you. I’ve got your back.”

So Gary faithfully followed his neurologist’s instructions, doing everything she told him. He took all his meds, followed all the procedures, did all the exercises — that is, he did pretty much all of the exercises.

Aerobics. Stretching. Tai chi. Hip-hop dancing. Triathlons. Yoga. Boxing. He even ran a marathon! But none of it brought him relief from his Parkinson’s disease.

And then he played golf… and felt pretty good afterwards. Then he played again.And again. And again. Within weeks, his Parkinson’s symptoms started disappearing. Before long, he was almost symptom-free.

To Gary, it felt like a miracle. But would it last?

Read the rest of Gary’s story in the latest issue of the Parkinson’sVoice. www.3parkinson.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

Songshine training in October

Interested in being a Trainer? Great for all neurological diseases! Let us know if you would like to see this training in the SFV at some future date.

TRAINING DETAILS 

SongShine Instructor Training is Coming This Fall!

Learn innovative techniques which bring new life to voice

compromised by Parkinson’s’ Disease,

stroke, other neurological disorders, and aging voices.

SongShine, an Arts in Healthcare Program,

is based on the science of neuroplasticity and built on the

foundation of breath.

Other techniques include:

Physical Awareness  ~~  Role Playing

Vocalises (classical singing exercises)  ~~  Speech

Group and Solo Singing  ~~  Emotional Engagement

Creative Imagination and Drama  ~~  Improvisation

Engaging the Creative Brain

——————————————————————————–

Instructor Training is ideal for Speech Therapists,

Music Therapists, Drama Therapists, Voice Teachers,

Singers, Choral / Instrumental Directors, Actors,

Activity Professionals, Teachers,

and those who have a passion for working with aging and

neurologically-challenged voices.

DATES

Check-in (Sunday) October 29, 2017, after 4pm:

Welcome Dinner and Opening Session at 6:30pm

(Monday and Tuesday) October 30 – 31, 2017:

Training will be held from 9am to 5pm

Check-out (Wednesday) November 1, 2017:

Training will be held from 9am to 3pm

LOCATION AND LODGING

Miramonte Indian Wells Resort and Spa

45000 Indian Wells Lane

Indian Wells, California 92210

The Miramonte Resort & Spa is a peaceful desert oasis

nestled near the Santa Rosa Mountains.

Set amid olive trees and citrus groves, you’ll feel

immediately at ease and at home at this spectacular

Tuscan-style resort, with an award-winning spa and

world-class golf right at your fingertips.

·       Complimentary Parking

·       Service Animals Allowed

—————————————————————————-

TRAINING FEE 

EARLY-BIRD Discount! $550 when registration is received

by October 1; $625 after October 1

Scholarship assistance is available for those with proof of

genuine need. Contact Terry Huff via email

at terry@songshineforparkinsons.org for more information.

WHAT IS INCLUDED?

Price includes:

  • Lodging; three nights at the Miramonte, a beautiful Hilton
  • Curio Collection Hotel near
  •  Palm Springs, CA (spacious room with King-sized bed;
  • free parking, complimentary
  • wi-fi internet access, and full use of the resort facilities)
  • Welcome Dinner and Opening Night Event
  • 3 Full Breakfasts
  • 3 Gourmet Lunches (special diets accommodated at no extra charge)
  • 20+ Hours of High-Intensity, Interactive, and Fun Training
  • Newly Revised, 126-page Training Manual with SongShine
  • Carry Bag
  • After the Training, you will receive on-going mentoring and
  • oversight by Ruthanna and Peter as you start and continue a

SongShine group in your local area, senior center, hospital, clinic or

senior residence facility

——————————————————————————-

  For additional  information about Songshine and how to

to register for this event, in your computer search button copy and

paste this  website:  http://www.songshineforparkinsons.org/

for  online registration and payments.

 

 

Knowledge is Power Aging with Dignity Symposium

SAVE THE DATE  SEPT 23rd

Knowledge is Power

Aging with Dignity Symposium

&

Caregiver Resource Day

DATE- Saturday, September 23, 2017

LOCATION –Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital

Education Center  23845 McBeanParkway

Valencia, CA 91355

 TIME: 9:00 am to 3:30 pm  

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Ronald Ziman, MD, FACP, FAAN

Chairman of the Board of the Neurocommunity Foundation

 Dr. Dean M. Hartley

Director of Science Initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association

TAKING CHARGE OF YOUR HEALTH

Isaac Vielma, MD  Palliative Medicine Physician

Geriatrics, Palliative Med & Continuing Care(GPCC)

Southern California Permanente Medical Group(SCPMG)

PANEL PRESENTATION FROM UCLA HEALTH, KAISER & CITY OF HOPE

 Registration fee of $5.00 includes all sessions, resource materials, access to vendors, drawings, continental breakfast and lunch. Make your reservation early; seating is limited.

 LUNCH & AFTERNOON EVENT HOSTED BY  SCV SENIOR RESOURCE ALLIANCE

For more information, please call SuzAnn at (661) 259-9444 or snelsen@scv-seniorcenter.org. 

Information Flyer from The SCV Senior Center: CLICK HERE:Aging with Dignity Symposium Sept 23 

The mission of the SCV Senior Center is to promote quality of life for seniors. SCV Senior Center ● 22900 Market Street ● Santa Clarita, CA ● 91321 ● 661-259-9444

August News from The NeuroCommunity Foundation

HAPPY AUGUST 

 PHONE NUMBER: 818-745-5051

Visit our website to find all detailed information about educational events, speakers, support groups and more! or click –  www.neurocommunity.org

REMEMBER: when you visit our website for information, KEEP SCROLLING down on each page to locate all website posts.  Several NEW articles may be posted under the same heading. The one you are looking for may not always be the first post!  Each listing below will have where, on our website, you may find detailed information, articles, etc.                    

KEEP SCROLLING FOR AUGUST SUPPORT GROUPS AND GUEST SPEAKER INFORMATION

—————————-

PLEASE SHOW YOUR SUPPORT TO

The NeuroCommunity Foundation 

by  making a DONATION TODAY! Thank you! 

Your gift helps to provide support groups, advocacy, referrals, personal communication with our Education Director and innovative programs to help patients, families and caregivers achieve a better quality of life!!! Donations can be made directly at our website by clicking here: www.neurocommunity.org   Checks can be mailed to our address below!


BREAKING NEWS

SAVE THE DATE: SEPT 23rd

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

Aging with Dignity  Symposium

SPEAKERS: Dr. Ronald Ziman , Neurologist and President, Board of Directors-The NeuroCommunity Foundation  Dr. Dean M. Hartley Director of Science Initiatives at the Alzheimer’s Association and Isaac Vielma, MD Palliative Medicine Physician Geriatrics, Palliative Med & Continuing Care (GPCC) Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) and a Panel presentation from UCLA Health, Kaiser and City of Hope. SEE BREAKING NEWS on our website for detailed  information. : www.neurocommunity.org

Visit our website to read the following articles!!

WELLNESS  –Music can change brain structure; The Power of a Positive Attitude;  What Parkinson’s taught me about life- by Emma Lawton, age 29 when diagnosed

CARE-GIVING  –Do you need a break from Care-giving?

MS – Keep Moving for your Health and Well-Being!!

PD  – PD services at the Veterans Administration;PD at the International Space Station, Travel and PD

BE INSPIRED –  Inspirations for the Dog Days of Summer

HELPFUL INFORMATION-   Travel information and Tips for persons with Disabilities

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS –  CSUN interns and Music Mends Minds.


AUGUST PD  SUPPORT GROUPS and GUEST SPEAKERS

CLICK HERE FOR: AUGUST SUPPORT GROUP LISTINGS 

AND 

CLICK ON  COLORED SPEAKER’S NAME TO

“MEET THE SPEAKER”

Understanding Duopa medication system: The what, why and how.   Speaker: DUOPA RN NURSE & PATIENT TESTIMONIAL (STUDIO CITY)

 REBECCA GOLDFARB , Elder Law Attorney: Everything you need to know; bring your questions!     (SIMI VALLEY) 

 JEANETTE GARRETT: Durable Medical Equipment: What’s new, available, costs and Medicare requirements/ changes. (CAMARILLO)

DR.  ROBERT HUTCHMAN and CORTNEY SADARIE “Non motor symptoms/ The right medication  (WESTLAKE and VENTURA)

 SAPNA M PATAL-ROSS ,PHD  Geriatric Neuro-psychologist             “The spectrum of cognitive changes observed in Parkinson’s Disease”  (SANTA BARBARA)                               

 ———————————

On the website, go to PD Educational Events for August

Please note: Due to the increase in computer viruses, we do not include a direct link to outside websites.  Please go to our website or click here: www.neurocommunity.org for all info.

PD  Telephone at home:  Memory Tips

LSVT:   Exercise versus Therapy for PD: How do I decide?

MJ FOX WEBINARWhat’s Going on in Washington?

PD EXPERT BRIEFING:  No webinar in August

 ———————————-

OUR ADDRESS

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

32705 Vanowen St.  # 216

West Hills, CA  91307  ( mailing address only)

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

  As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to  support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is: www.neurocommunity.org or mail to our address below.

 Information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, click: contact or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing address: The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                              23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                             West Hills, Ca 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning with music can change brain structure

Learning with music can change brain structure

Using musical cues to learn a physical task significantly develops an important part of the brain, according to a new study

People who practiced a basic movement task to music showed increased structural connectivity between the regions of the brain that process sound and control movement.

The findings focus on white matter pathways — the wiring that enables brain cells to communicate with each other.

The study could have positive implications for future research into rehabilitation for patients who have lost some degree of movement control.

Thirty right-handed volunteers were divided into two groups and charged with learning a new task involving sequences of finger movements with the non-dominant, left hand. One group learned the task with musical cues, the other group without music.

After four weeks of practice, both groups of volunteers performed equally well at learning the sequences, researchers at the University of Edinburgh found.

Using MRI scans, it was found that the music group showed a significant increase in structural connectivity in the white matter tract that links auditory and motor regions on the right side of the brain. The non-music group showed no change.

Researchers hope that future study with larger numbers of participants will examine whether music can help with special kinds of motor rehabilitation programs, such as after a stroke.

The interdisciplinary project brought together researchers from the University of Edinburgh’s Institute for Music in Human and Social Development, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, and Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, and from Clinical Neuropsychology, Leiden University, The Netherlands.

The results are published in the journal Brain & Cognition.

Dr Katie Overy, who led the research team said: “The study suggests that music makes a key difference. We have long known that music encourages people to move. This study provides the first experimental evidence that adding musical cues to learning new motor task can lead to changes in white matter structure in the brain.”

Story Source:

Materials provided by University of EdinburghNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Journal Reference:

  1. Emma Moore, Rebecca S. Schaefer, Mark E. Bastin, Neil Roberts, Katie Overy. Diffusion tensor MRI tractography reveals increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in arcuate fasciculus following music-cued motor trainingBrain and Cognition, 2017; 116: 40 DOI: 1016/j.bandc.2017.05.001

 

 

 

Travel tips for accessible and safe travel

ACCESSIBLE TRAVEL TIPS

Travel by people with disabilities, also known as “disabled travel” or “accessible travel,” is on the rise. The travel industry is waking up to disabled travelers’ special needs by providing more services and greater accommodation. Meanwhile, the sheer abundance of information on accessible travel is astounding — much of it generated by disabled travelers themselves.

The Americans with Disabilities Act guarantees that travelers with disabilities receive equal treatment under the law. While this would be the case in a perfect world, it doesn’t always work out that way in real life, especially in foreign countries where accessibility regulations vary widely. Despite having common sense, considerable public sentiment and strength in numbers, travelers with disabilities frequently face inadequate facilities, prejudice, misinformation, general hassles and higher prices than other travelers.

Compounding the problem is the fact that there are as many disabilities as there are disabled folks. Each person’s needs are a little different, and traveling in cookie-cutter airline seats, hotel rooms and rental car fleets can be very tricky. The following tips and resources will help disabled travelers and their companions anticipate some of the snags of accessible travel.

Disabled Travel Tips

1. Call ahead. Service providers are required by law in many cases to accommodate travelers with special needs. However, most need some time to make the necessary arrangements. Mention your needs at the time of reservation, and call the provider 24 to 48 hours before your arrival to confirm that proper accommodations have been made.

  1. Be specific and clear when describing a disability. Not all service providers know the “lingo” of accessible travel, or the medical terms for certain conditions. Give as many details as you can about what you can and can’t do, and don’t downplay the severity of the disability. The more information a service provider has, the better they will be able to accommodate you. If they promise you certain accommodations, try to get these promises in writing.
  2. Be specific and clear when describing the trip to your doctor. A doctor can often prescribe measures for coping with an unusually long flight, limited medical facilities at your destination, the unavailability of prescription drugs and other pitfalls of traveling. Be prepared — in some cases, your doctor may question the advisability of travel.
  3. Take a doctor’s note and phone number. Travel with a statement from your doctor, preferably on letterhead, covering your condition, medications, potential complications, special needs and other pertinent information. Be sure you have a number where your doctor (or another medical professional) can be reached in an emergency situation at any hour of the day.

Safety and Health Tips for Travelers

  1. Bring extra medication. Many experts advise that you travel with two complete packages of essential medication in case of emergency. Store all medications and other necessary medical suppliesin your carry-on bag.
  2. Investigate physician availability where you will be traveling. Your doctor, health careprovider, insurance company or local embassy can provide the names and contact numbers of physicians at your destination. For more information, see Health Care Abroad.
  3. Carry medical alert information, preferably in a place that a medical professional or anyone who assists you will find easily (wallet card, necklace, close to your identification).
  4. Consider using a specialist travel agent. Some agents provide stellar niche services; one might be very experienced in working with hearing-impaired travelers, another with developmentally impaired travelers. Since the requirements for these varied travelers can be staggeringly different, it helps to find someone who knows the ropes. Check the agent search feature at TravelSense.orgto find qualified travel agents across the U.S.
  5. Avoid connecting flights. Although wheelchairs are the last items to be checked into the luggage compartments, and thus first to be pulled off, flying direct can save you unnecessary time and hassle. One exception: If you have trouble maneuvering into airplane lavatories, long flights may become uncomfortable — so a series of shorter flights might be a better option. If you do choose to connect, be sure to allow plenty of time between flights (we’d recommend at least 90 minutes, or two hours if you need to go through customs or security) to get from one gate to the next.

Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

-Allow plenty of time before your flight to check in, get through security and transfer to your gate. Arrive at least two hours before a domestic flight and three hours before an international flight — more if you’re traveling at a peak time.Check in with your flight attendant before your plane lands to make a plan for exit.

-Don’t forget about transportation to and from the airport. If you have a wheelchair, make arrangements in advance to have an accessible vehicle pick you up in your destination city.

-Bring spare parts and tools. Wheelchairs can take tremendous abuse while traveling; assemble a small kit of spare partsand tools for emergency repairs. You may also be required to dismantle a wheelchair for certain flights or activities; make sure you and your traveling companions know how to do this.

-Know your rights. Before going through airport security, be aware of the TSA’s rules   for travelers with disabilities and medical conditions. See also the U.S. Department of Transportation’s guide to the rights of travelers with disabilities.

Be creative. Reader Dorothy Dean, who has a mobility disability, wrote to us with the following suggestion: “When traveling by car, I can use a bariatric walker in lieu of grab bars in the bathroom. You simply walk it up to the toilet, put it in place against the toilet, turn around, sit down and you have sturdy arms to use for getting up. It’s a little uncomfortable but is fine for travel.” Dean notes that this tip works best with large, sturdy walkers that have hand holds designed to help people rise, not just walk: “I would never use my regular walker to get up from a toilet,” she wrote.

Useful Websites and Resources

For more information on traveling with all types of disabilities, check out the websites and other resources below.

Accessible Journeys: Tour operator for slow walkers, wheelchair travelers and their companions

Accomable: A guide to accessible lodging around the world

Barrier-FreeCruising.com: Tips and resources for disabled cruise travelers

CruiseCritic.com: Info on cruising with a disability

DisabledTravelers.com: Comprehensive listing of accessible travel specialists around the world

Disabled Traveler’s Guide to the World: Travel tips and destination guides for disabled travelers

Emerging Horizons: An online quarterly newsletter providing a wide range of information for mobility-impaired travelers

Gimp on the Go: Destination guides, travel tips, photo gallery and resources for disabled travelers

Limitless Travel: U.K.-based company offering accessible tours in Europe

TravelGuides.org: A wealth of tour operators, travel agents, hotels, attractions and more that cater to disabled travelers

Travel on the Level: Tips and destination recommendations for travelers looking for less strenuous walking and fewer stairs

World on Wheelz: Agency specializing in accessible getaways for wheelchair travelers, slow walkers and seniors with special needs

 

The power of a positive attitude

The Power of a Positive Attitude

What if you could change one thing about yourself that was proven, time and time again, to have a significant positive impact on your business success, that helped build healthier and long lasting relationships, that improved the quality of your social life, and that had a measurable effect on your health and wellness–and it was FREE–would you do it? Introducing the solution everybody’s capable of, a positive attitude.

Having a positive attitude isn’t about being overly optimistic or super-happy all the time, it’s more about perspective.  It’s looking at the things, people, feelings, and environment in your life and changing the way you think about those things.  It means changing your focus from “I wish” to “I can”.  It’s addressing negativity, defeatism, and hopelessness with a perspective that redirects your thoughts toward solutions and positive change.

There’s a pretty good body of evidence that positive mental attitude works.  From early work by psychologist Carl Rogers to motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, to sports figures like Steve Prefontaine and Tom Dempsey, the results of positive mental attitude can manifest itself is many different ways.

Your attitude effects learning and work, too. The more competent you feel, the more you can stick with a difficult task, or the more likely you are to find a new way to look at things or try something new.  A positive attitude about who you are translates to a positive self-esteem. A “can-do” attitude about work or school can translate into better performance all around.

From a health perspective, many studies suggest people with a more positive attitude have a significantly higher chance of survival and recovery from serious illness.  If you’ve ever known anyone with cancer or someone who’s suffered some trauma that has overturned their lives, you may have seen the power of attitude in setting the tone for how others interact, and improvements in the quality of their lives and the lives of people around them.

So where do you begin?  Choose one aspect of your life–a relationship, your physical health, your work, your school, your hobby–and stop thinking negatively.  Make it a point that when you think about the activity, you force yourself to see the GOOD along with the bad in each situation.  You don’t ignore the bad, you think of good ways to cope with those things.

Some people help themselves focus on those changes through yoga, meditation, affirmations, or just thoughtfulness.  Some turn to increased physical activity, like running or join a gym.  Or a focused hobby, like puzzle solving. Or working on a specific relationship.  All these activities are set up for real, measurable improvement, which helps you see progress as your positive attitude toward the people and things around you make things better.  Make YOU better.

Lots of people interested in starting their journey toward a more positive attitude also seek the relaxation and grounding of massage. Massage sessions can provide valuable “disconnect” time where you can center you thoughts while doing something wonderful for you body, mind and spirits. We have quite a few clients who come to us twice a month for therapeutic massage (massage that targets a specific “ouch” or tension) and reap the additional benefits of relaxation and stress reduction that comes with these sessions.  All this helps them feel better about their world–and helps cultivate a more positive mental attitude. We know you’re capable of making your attitude more positive.  Try it, you’ll like it.

source: http://svmassagetherapy.com

PD Education Telephone, LVST and MJ Fox webinars

AUGUST 2017 PD EDUCATIONAL EVENTS

 PD Telephone

Telephone Conference Call

Topic:  Memory Tips (strategies for improving memory)

Target Audience:  People w/ PD or other Parkinsonian syndromes, family, friends, community, health care providers

Speaker: Gali H Weissberger, PhD postdoc fellow in Clinical Neuropsychology, VA Greater Los Angeles

Date:  Aug 8th, at 10 am PT, 11 am MT, 12 noon CT, or 1 pm ET (1 hour)

Call-in:  1-800-767-1750   Code 54321#   (call in about 3 min prior to the hour)

LSVT

Title: Exercise versus Therapy for PD: How do I decide?Date: Wednesday, August 23, 2017
Time: 11 am – 12 noon Pacific Daylight Time                                          To register, you must go to the LSVT website: No link is provided for security reasons.   LSVT website is: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8189551112880893441

Webinar DescriptionThe role of exercise in the management of Parkinson disease (PD) is becoming widely accepted. Is physical or voice exercise on your own enough to make improvements in body movement and vocal production or is intensive behavioral treatment a better option for making changes?

If you would like a specific question addressed during the webinar, you may submit questions to webinars@lsvtglobal.com prior to the broadcast date. You will also have the opportunity to ask questions during the webinar through either a voice or chat option.

Join LSVT BIG® and LSVT LOUD® Expert Clinicians as they present current literature on exercise in PD and how LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD can help individuals with PD improve motor and voice symptoms. Tips and strategies for maintaining a healthy body and voice exercise habit will also be presented.

MJ FOX WEBINAR

TOPIC: What’s Going on in Washington?

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Time: 9 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time

Thursday, August 17 @ 12 p.m. ET / 9 a.m. PT

In this webinar, we’ll discuss policy issues and what they mean for the Parkinson’s community. We’ll also share resources you can use to advocate this August while Congress is in recess and lawmakers return to their home states to meet with constituents.

NOTE:  For additional information and registration, you will need to go the MJ FOX website directly. We do not add links to external website for security reasons.

WEBSITE: www.michaeljfox.org/understanding-parkinsons/webinar-registration

PD Expert Briefing

No webinar in August.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing address: The NeuroCommunity Foundation 

23705 Vanowen St. # 216   West Hills, California 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VA Establishes Six Parkinson’s Disease Centers

 

VA Establishes Six Parkinson’s Disease Centers

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurologic disorders.  It affects roughly 1.5 million Americans.  The main signs are tremor, stiffness of the body, slowness of movement, and difficulty with balance.  It is believed to be caused by a deficiency of a brain chemical called dopamine.  Although there is no cure for PD at the present time, some medication and surgical treatments can dramatically improve many of the symptoms.

The Veterans Health Administration treats an estimated 40,000 veterans with PD each year.  In 2001, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs strengthened its commitment to veterans with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and related movement disorders by establishing the Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECCs) network.  This network supports six PD Centers of Excellence located in  Portland/Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, Richmond, and Philadelphia (see map).  Each PADRECC is designed to deliver state-of-the art clinical care, innovative research, and outreach and education programs to its surrounding region, also referred to as their “service area”. Los Angeles (Southwest) PADRECC Director, Jeff Bronstein, MD, PhD
Phone: 310-268-3975

Parkinson’s Disease

The Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Center

(PADRECC) at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare Center

provides comprehensive care to patients with Parkinson’s disease

and other movement disorders.The Center specializes in applying

advanced surgical techniques to the treatment of —

·   Parkinson’s disease

·   essential tremor

·   dystonia

·   other movement disorders

Services Offered Services offered by the Center include —

extensive neurological and neurosurgical evaluation to determine if a

patient is an appropriate  candidate for surgical treatment

·systematic pre-operative testing of patients deemed to be candidates

for surgical treatment

  • surgical treatment
  • pallidotomy, a procedure which can signficantly improve most
  • signs of Parkinson’s disease  and thalamotomy,                                                                                               effective in reducing tremors

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, please support our efforts. You can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org  and our mailing address is below! Thank you.

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216       West Hills, California 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inspirations for the Dog Days of Summer

Take a moment out of your busy day to contemplate:

 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org  and our mailing address is below. 

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Donation Information

I would like to make a donation in the amount of:

$200$100$50Other

I would like this donation to automatically repeat each month

Tribute Gift

Check here to donate in honor or memory of someone

Donor Information

First Name:
Last Name:
Email:
Add me to your mailing list
Phone:

Donor Address

Address:
Address 2:(optional)
City:
State :
Country:
Postal Code:

Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Support us when you shop for back-to-school items.

Just Click Here and Shop

Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process