Clinical Study in Woodland Hills on Depression

ARE YOU SUFFERING FROM DEPRESSION?  ? ARE YOU OVER THE AGE OF 60?

Study in Woodland Hills at the UCLA  Satellite office – Motion Picture TV Fund building.

The UCLA Late-Life Mood, Stress and Wellness Program in the Geriatric Psychiatry Division is conducting a 6-month research study involving 12 weekly 60 minute session of either a health and education wellness class or a Tai Chi class. Participants will undergo two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. A complete psychiatric evaluation will be provided. Subjects will not be charged for participation and will be compensated. You must be at least 60 years old.

If you or anyone you know is interested in participating, call for an appointment to see if you qualify or for more information at: (310) 794-9523.

.In the San Fernando Valley, the study will be conducted at the Motion
Picture Television Fund in Woodland Hills for most of the study

NOTE:There is a baseline trip to UCLA required in order for the subject
to be consented by the Primary  Investigator and get an MRI/blood draw. Additionally, the  subject would have to come in to UCLA near the end of the
study for a final assessment.

The study will be conducted by Helen Lavretsky, M.D. Protocol ID:IRB#15-000184 UCLA IRB Approved

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                            

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                              

West Hills, CA 91307

Songshine Training in October Sign up now

 

SongShine Instructor Training is Coming This Fall!

TRAINING DETAILS 

Learn innovative techniques which bring new life to voice compromised

by Parkinson’s’ Disease,

stroke, other neurological disorders, and aging voices. SongShine,

an Arts in Healthcare Program,

is based on the science of neuroplasticity and built on the foundation of breath.

Other techniques include:

Physical Awareness  ~~  Role Playing

Vocalises (classical singing exercises)  ~~  Speech

Group and Solo Singing  ~~  Emotional Engagement

Creative Imagination and Drama  ~~  Improvisation

Engaging the Creative Brain

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Instructor Training is ideal for Speech Therapists, Music Therapists,

Drama Therapists, Voice Teachers,

Singers, Choral / Instrumental Directors, Actors, Activity Professionals,

Teachers, and those who have a passion for working with aging and

neurologically-challenged voices.

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DATES

Check-in (Sunday) October 29, 2017, after 4pm:

Welcome Dinner and Opening Session at 6:30pm

(Monday and Tuesday) October 30 – 31, 2017:

Training will be held from 9am to 5pm

Check-out (Wednesday) November 1, 2017:

Training will be held from 9am to 3pm

LOCATION AND LODGING

Miramonte Indian Wells Resort and Spa

45000 Indian Wells Lane

Indian Wells, California 92210

The Miramonte Resort & Spa is a peaceful desert oasis nestled near the

Santa Rosa Mountains.

Set amid olive trees and citrus groves, you’ll feel immediately at ease and

at home at this spectacular  Tuscan-style resort, with an award-winning spa and golf                                                                                                                          world-class golf right

at your fingertips.     Complimentary Parking   Service Animals Allowed

TRAINING FEE 

EARLY-BIRD Discount! $550 when registration is received by

October 1; $625 after October 1

Scholarship assistance is available for those with proof of genuine need.

Contact Terry Huff via email

 at terry@songshineforparkinsons.org for more information.

WHAT IS INCLUDED?

Price includes:

Lodging; three nights at the Miramonte, a beautiful Hilton Curio Collection Hotel near

Palm Springs, CA (spacious room with King-sized bed; free parking, complimentary

wi-fi internet access, and full use of the resort facilities)

Welcome Dinner and Opening Night Event

3 Full Breakfasts

3 Gourmet Lunches (special diets accommodated at no extra charge)

20+ Hours of High-Intensity, Interactive, and Fun Training

Newly Revised, 126-page Training Manual with SongShine Carry Bag

After the Training, you will receive on-going mentoring and oversight

by Ruthanna and Peter as you start and continue a

SongShine group in your local area, senior center, hospital, clinic,

or senior residence  facility

HOW DO I REGISTER? 

Go to www.songshineforparkinsons.org  for registration and information

 

MS Trial Alerts for California

MS Trial Alert: Investigators in California, Recruiting for Study of Online Program to Treat Depression in All Forms of MS

SUMMARY: Investigators at three sites in the United States and two sites in Germany are recruiting 400 people with all forms of MS for a study testing the effectiveness of a computer training program for overcoming MS-related depression. The lead investigator is Stefan Gold, PhD, at Charité University in Berlin, Germany. The study is funded by the National MS Society. Please note: Two visits to a study site are required.

DETAILS
Rationale: Depression is a common symptom experienced by people living with multiple sclerosis. At the same time, MS symptoms such as walking difficulties, cognitive problems, and fatigue can make it difficult to attend sessions with a psychotherapist. Dr. Gold’s team recently conducted a small trial using a fully-automated, computer-based program to reduce depression in people with MS. The program can be accessed over the internet and completed from an individual’s home, eliminating the need to travel. The team’s preliminary results suggested that this program, called “Deprexis,” may reduce MS depression.

Dr. Gold and colleagues are now conducting a large-scale, phase III trial at five MS centers in Germany and the U.S. to test the effectiveness of the Deprexis computer training program in 400 people with MS.

Eligibility and Details: Participants should be over the age of 18, with a diagnosis of MS and symptoms of depression. They should be able to travel to a study site for two clinical assessments, and must have internet access at home. Further details are available by contacting the site nearest you.

Participants are being randomly assigned to one of three groups: One group will receive access to the web-based Deprexis program for three months; another group will receive the web-based Deprexis program plus scheduled e-mail contacts once each week for three months; and a third control group will be on a waiting list, and will receive Deprexis only after waiting six months.

The primary outcome being assessed is a clinical scale that measures depression. Other outcomes include measures of quality of life, cognitive function, and fatigue. Participants are being evaluated at the beginning of the study, and after three months, six months and 12 months. The first two evaluations require a visit to the study site at which they are enrolled, whereas the last two are completed online.

Contact: To learn more about the enrollment criteria for this study, and to find out if you are eligible to participate, please contact the U.S. site nearest you:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California
Phone: (310) 423-4008
Email: Daniel.Perez2@cshs.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                              

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                               

West Hills, CA 91307

Emergency Checklist Helpful Information

Emergency Checklist for Seniors and their Caregivers

How to be prepared:

We hope we’ll never need the information, but if there is an emergency this checklist readily available will make your life easier along with your family and caregivers.  SUGGESTION: insert all info into a COLORED 3 ring BINDER!

Health emergencies with our elders can often become complicated by the sheer number of medications, doctors, insurance coverage and degree of chronic or acute illness (es) involved. Below is a comprehensive list of information and documents to keep on hand, so you’ll be prepared.

Senior Care Emergency Checklist

  • Doctors’ names, their specialties and phone numbers.
  • List of all medications being taken and what the prescriptions are for (be sure to keep the information updated — as the medications may change frequently).
  • Medical insurance and prescription plans and identification numbers.
  • Social security number — many insurance companies won’t talk to anyone without the patient’s social security number.
  • Durable power of attorney— a legal document that gives someone the authority to handle legal and financial issues if your parent or elderly relative becomes incapacitated.
  • Health care proxy — a legal document that gives someone the authority to make medical decisions for your parent or elderly relative.
  • Specification of your wishes about resuscitation orders. Knowing this information before a crisis can be crucial to the way in which you handle the crisis.
  • Basic financial records — a list of assets, account numbers, names and contact information for financial advisors or bank representative.
  • Names and addresses of people to notify in case of an emergency — such as children, grandchildren, close friends and neighbors who might be able to help out.

Include list of passwords/log in information for emails/computer information.

  • Names and contact information for local clergy, if your parent or elderly relative has a preferred religious affiliation.

This information should be placed in the home in an easy-to-find location, such as near the phone in the kitchen, or in another commonly used area, as well as given to another family member, caregiver or friend who agrees to keep a copy of the information for you.

AUTHOR: Ronnie Friedland: an editor at Care.com 2017

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reminders for everyone as we enter the Autumn Season

 

Take time to readjust your body, as we enter Autumn!

Below are some good reminders!

Falling leaves and early sunsets mean autumn is coming. These seasonal changes, like slowness of movement, stiffness and rigidity throughout the body, can increase the risk of falling.

We know that Falls are a risk for everyone! . Below are some things you can do to prevent falls this autumn AND general tips for the tranisiton between

Summer to Autumn.

🍁 Readjust to the time change faster. Each morning, open all shades and make the home as bright as possible. During the day, go for a walk or read outside (bring your sunscreen). At night, try to go to sleep at the same time each day.
🍁 Talk to your health care team. They will help you assess your biggest fall risk factors — like medications, balance issues, stress or environmental hazards.
🍁 See a physical therapist BEFORE a fall occurs. He or she can teach you how to safely get back up and can show caregivers the best way to assist their loved one while avoiding injuries.
🍁 Consider making changes around the house: in the bathroom, use non-skid surfaces and grab bars. In the living room, move coffee tables and clear all walking paths.

The transition from summer to fall can be a challenge. To help ease the change, we have put together 15 Autumn Wellness Tips to get you ready for the colder months and keep your mental (and physical!) health in check.

-Start taking a Vitamin D supplement. We get most of our Vitamin D from the sun, so our intake decreases when the weather is colder since we spend most of our time inside during the fall/winter seasons. If you find you are not getting outside much, a Vitamin D supplement can boost your mood and immune system!

-Take some time to yourself. Autumn and winter are the Earth’s way of telling us to slow down. Start a journal or track your moods to get more in touch with how your feeling.

-Get your flu shot and yearly check-up. Self explanatory! No one likes sniffling and aching and sneezing and coughing getting in the way of life. Yuck.

Boost your immune system. You can do this by drinking plenty of water, washing your hands often to prevent sickness, and eating nutritious foods.

-Get yourself ready for Daylight Savings Time. Go to bed earlier when you can, especially the week before the clocks change. Longer periods of darkness = longer periods of sleep!

(Don’t forget to change any manual clocks (like an alarm clock!)

-Make some plans for the cold months. In the winter, we tend to hibernate if we don’t have things to keep us busy.

-Moisturize your skin. Harsh temperatures can make your skin dry. Also, you still should be wearing sunscreen.

-Buy in-season food. Beets, broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, kale, pumpkin, broths, roasted squash, roots and sautéed dark leafy greens are all great choices.

-Stay active! It can be easy to just sit around all the time, but it’s important to get in some movement throughout the day. Raking leaves or shoveling snow counts!

-Wear layers and protect your body from the dropping temperature. Make sure you have gloves, a scarf, ear muffs, a winter coat, warm socks, and snow boots!

-Do some “spring cleaning” in the fall. Clean out your closet, organize that back room, and rid yourself of things you don’t need.

-Prepare your home for possible extreme weather conditions. Do you have a shovel and/or snow blower? Do your flashlights have batteries? Is your heat working okay?

-Get some books to read and shows to watch. Who doesn’t want to sit by the fire on chilly winter nights and read a good book or binge-watch some Netflix?

-Keep a schedule. The cold months can seem to drag on and push us into isolation. Stay on track by scheduling time in your day to do things you like to do.

-Be kind to yourself. The holidays can cause weight gain, the shorter days can cause low mood, and the flu season can cause sickness. Listen to your body and give it what it needs, and don’t beat yourself up! Try reframing negative thoughts into positive ones.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                                  

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                             

West Hills, CA 91307

 

Getting Rid of Tension Headaches

GETTING RID OF TENSION HEADACHES

MOTHER’s invention: To relieve headache pain, dab a drop or two of thyme or rosemary essential oil on each temple and on your forehead. Rub gently into the skin, then sit quietly for several minutes to let this home remedy work. A few simple exercises to stretch your head and neck can help reduce the intensity of the headache.

What else you can do

Medical treatment for headache disorders can often be assisted by the patient in their daily actions. For prevention of headaches it’s important to evaluate your lifestyle and identify areas for improvement. Regular exercise and regular, consistent rest are vital components of preserving a healthy lifestyle. Maintaining a healthy diet, including drinking lots of fluids, might also help prevent symptoms. Identify triggers for your headaches and avoid interaction with these as much as possible. Some possible triggers are include:

  • Certain foods such as aged cheeses, sausages, chocolate, fermented food, MSG
  • Use of alcohol
  • Chemicals such as nicotine, gasoline, glue, household cleaners, perfumes, paint
  • Certain emotions such as stress
  • Disruption in your regular schedule such as skipping a meal or disruption in your sleep pattern
  • Hormones – Many women, esp. migraine sufferers, notice symptoms tend to occur at a certain point in their menstrual cycle
  • Change in environment such as when traveling or a move to a new home
  • Change in weather

When interaction with certain triggers is inevitable, try to develop ways to combat these interactions. Take extra care with your health. Drink plenty of fluids, get extra rest. Minimize interaction as much as possible. When a headache is occurring, preventative measures will not help the emergent need to reduce your pain; but there are some things you can do in an acute situation to help decrease your symptoms. If you take medication at the onset of a headache, try to take the medication at the first sign of symptoms – the earlier the better! During a headache, use a cold compress, lie down in a dark quiet room, and drink fluids (suck on ice if nausea makes it difficult to drink). Try using relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, visualization of a peaceful and  serene scene, progressive relaxation, or massage the muscles of your head and neck.

From: http://neurologicalwellness.com

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

 

USC FREE Caregivers Conference Oct 28th

For all caregivers:

USC  Family Caregivers Program is hosting a FREE Caregiving conference on

Saturday, Oct. 28th, from 9am – 2pm.

CLICK on the green link below which will give you all the detailed information.

Caregiving conference Oct 28 Free at USC

Please feel free to call The NeuroCommunity Foundation: 818 745-5051 if you are unable to  connect with this link.

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NEW : 2 DAY education forum in Anaheim on October 28th and 29 for PD                               GO TO:  https://www.apdaparkinson.org/westcoastforum

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

October 2017 Education Events

PD EDUCATIONAL EVENTS

 OCTOBER 2017

LSVT:  Title: Am I too early to start LSVT BIG® or LSVT LOUD®?

Date: Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Time: 11:00am PST ) Registration   https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7842499063666476289

Description: Individuals with early stage Parkinson disease (PD) or early onset PD may not yet be exhibiting many physical or vocal characteristics of PD. However, intensive behavioral treatment for body movement (LSVT BIG) and vocal loudness (LSVT LOUD) can still be appropriate for these populations. Join LSVT BIG and LSVT LOUD Expert Clinicians for a discussion on how these treatment protocols can help maintain current levels of functioning, uncover movement and vocal challenges, and improve movement and voice while potentially slowing symptom progression. If you would like a specific question addressed during the webinar, you may submit questions to webinars@lsvtglobal.com prior to the broadcast date. You will also have the opportunity to ask questions during the webinar through either a voice or chat option.

PD Telephone at home:  

Managing the Cognitive and Psychiatric Symptoms Associated                                   with Parkinson’s Disease

Speaker: Danielle Hergert, Neuropsychology Fellow

New Mexico VA Health Care System

Date:  OCT 10th, at 10 am PT, 1 hour

Call-in:  1-800-767-1750   Code 54321#   (call in about 3 min prior to the hour)

MJ Fox webinar on Third Thursdays of each month

TOPIC: What Do a Dog and Keyboard Have in Common? Screening for Parkinson’s

Thursday, October 19, 2017    TIME: 9 a.m. PT

Our expert panelists will discuss studies using dog sniffing, keyboard strokes and other tactics to screen for Parkinson’s risk. We’ll also talk about what early signs of disease to look for if you feel you’re at risk for Parkinson’s. Go to www.michaeljfox.org to register.

PD Expert Briefing:  No educational program in October.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address:     The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                          23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                               West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ask the Pharmacist about new medication for Dyskenesia

Ask the Pharmacist: New drug approved for Parkinson’s treatment

Dr. Richard Hoffman 

Q: I heard that a new drug was approved for Parkinson’s disease. What can you tell me about it?

A: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Gocovri (amantadine extended-release capsules) for the treatment of dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) receiving levodopa-based therapy, with or without other dopaminergic medications.

Dyskinesias are unpredictable, unwanted and uncontrollable writhing, dance-like movements of the arms, legs or head. They occur in over half of all PD patients who take levodopa for four to six years, and increases to more than 90 percent of those patients who take levodopa for a decade or longer. In clinical studies Gocovri, when given once daily at bedtime, significantly reduced the incidence of dyskinesias and increased functional time with symptoms improved in patients with PD.

The most common side effects observed in studies of Gocovri were hallucinations, dizziness, dry mouth, peripheral edema, constipation, falls and decreased blood pressure upon arising (orthostatic hypotension).

It should be noted that immediate-release amantadine is an anti-viral agent that has been available for many years to treat or prevent the flu. It has also been used “off-label” to treat patients with PD, where it is given 2-3 times daily; however, clinical comparisons between Gocovri and generic immediate-release amantadine have not been studied.

Gocovri is the first and only FDA-approved medication for the treatment of dyskinesia in PD patients. As such, there will likely be a large cost difference between Gocovri and generic amantadine immediate release.

Dr. Richard P. Hoffmann, Pharm D, is a retired pharmacist and medical writer with over 40 years of experience. He currently serves as consumer representative on the FDA’s Advisory Committee for Peripheral & Central Nervous System Drugs and is a patient representative for FDA Advisory Committees related to Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Hoffman is also a research advocate for the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                             

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216                               

West Hills, CA 91307

FITNESS for Traumatic Brain Injury

Fitness Considerations for TBI

A TBI can affect one’s movement, balance, cognition, and emotions. The following physical considerations should be taken into account when designing an exercise program. Paralysis may be present in two or all four extremities. Impairments in motor control and coordination as well as limited range of motion and spasticity can occur. Individuals with TBI may have balance issues that affect sitting or standing as well as seizures that result from an abnormality in electric activity in the brain. Cognition is often affected resulting in the potential for mental confusion, memory loss, and impaired ability to learn and process new information. Lastly, emotions may be impacted resulting in mood swings, depression, anxiety, apathy, aggression, and irritable behavior.

An exercise program for a person with TBI should be tailored to address concerns of excessive tone, spasticity, decreased range of motion, decreased cardiovascular and muscular endurance, loss of flexibility, over-use injury, and affected side neglect⁴.  Incorporating physical activity to improve these concerns can increase one’s quality of life and ability to perform activities of daily living skills (ADLS). There are a variety of additional considerations that must be taken into account when creating an effective exercise program for individuals with TBI, including:

  • A typical standing exercise may need to be performed seated or standing while using a fixed-support structured to ensure safety when balance issues are present⁴. The NCHPAD video series on balance training can aid in selecting appropriate exercises to perform.
  • When cognition issues are present, incorporating multi-joint exercises are beneficial in developing retention of complex movement or muscle memory⁴. To maintain consistency and proper form throughout an exercise cueing from a fitness professional or exercise partner may be necessary.
  • Affected side neglect can be addressed with resistive ROM exercises where the individual is actively performing an exercise and the fitness professional is resisting the movement they are performing. This type of exercise allows for the incorporation of strength training into the passive joint or muscle group.
  • Aerobic activity options can include upper and/or lower body ergometers and treadmills. The goal for aerobic exercise is to increase independence in ADLS and decrease risk of cardiovascular disease. Individuals with TBI should focus on intensity of 40 to 70 percent VO2 peak and 13 to 20 on the Borg Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale⁴. Activity should be performed on three to five days per week with 20 to 60 minutes per session.
  • Strength training should include isometric exercises, weight machines, and free weights. The goal is increased independence in ADLS by improving muscular strength and function. Training should be performed on at least two days per week with three sets of eight to 12 repetitions⁴.
  • Flexibility training should include stretching and ROM exercises. The goal is to increase ROM of involved extremities and prevent contractures. These exercises should be performed at least two days per week ideally after aerobic and/or strength training⁴.
  • Neuromuscular training should include coordination and balance activities. The goal is to improve level of safety of ADLS. These exercises should be performed on at least two days per week ideally on the same days as strength training⁴.
  • Warm water pool training is beneficial in individuals with TBI as is provides a weightless environment for the development of functional movement⁴.
  • Individuals with TBI have lower oxidative capacities and faster fatigue rates.  During physical activity make sure to incorporate proper rest between exercises and consider exercise during a time of the day that does not further promote fatigue.
  • Circuit training has been found effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness of individuals with TBI². This type of training combines resistance exercise with aerobic exercise through a variety of different types of movements. A combination of alternating upper and lower body work with high resistance, short duration exercise with low resistance, longer duration aerobic exercise, and upper body ergometry has been effective in persons with TBI².

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

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23705 Vanowen St. # 216                               

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
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Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process