Lecture on new Advances in DBS Pasadena January 2018

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Presentation on New Advances in DBS treatments

January 9, 2018

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy has been proven over the past 20 years* to be an effective treatment option for symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The latest advancements to DBS offer innovations in the way the therapy is delivered and how it is controlled. Attend this free informational seminar to learn more about DBS therapy, including the benefits and risks of this therapy. Call 323-326-4158 or email jsykes@sjm.com to reserve your spot.

Igor Fineman, MD, FACS
Jennifer Birch, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC
Raymond Neurosurgery & Spine
Yvette Yeung, MD | DaVita Healthcare Partners
Tyler Cheung, MD | Huntington Hospital

January 9, 2018 | 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
South Pasadena Public Library Community Room
1115 El Centro Ave
Pasadena, CA 91030

Caregiver reminders for the New Year

 

New Year’s 2018: Resolutions for Caregivers

Posted by Peter Andersen,

As the New Year approaches, it often brings a feeling of optimism. That’s a welcome gift, especially for those of us caring for the elderly.

To help maximize this optimism, we’ve gathered 13 New Year’s resolutions geared specifically toward caregivers.

Resolution 1: Write a personal mission statement for the year. Chicago-based author and senior caregiving expert Joy Loverde offers a way to plan for a positive year ahead. Loverde is the author of several books, including Who Will Take Care of Me When I’m Old? “At the end of every year I create a personal mission statement… that provides me with a path for success in my personal relationships,” she explains. With goals clearly stated, “I never have to wonder – Did I say I love you enough?” Set a few benchmarks for yourself and post them where you can see them for daily motivation.

Resolution 2: Learn to take a break. This definitely should be one of your New Year’s goals. The key word here is “learn.” People tell you every day you should take a break, but we all know it’s easier said than done. “Caregivers are known for putting their loved one’s needs above their own,” says Peter Ross, CEO of Senior Helpers in Towson, MD. “While the goal is to give your aging loved ones the best quality of life possible, you also need to understand the importance of taking care of yourself. Time-outs, yoga and getting ‘you time’ time in are great starters to creating work-life balance.”

Resolution 3: Get moving. Another priority goal: Activity. Keeping your body moving, blood circulating and muscles working is crucial to your own health, but you may not feel like you have time. Start with a commitment of 5 to 10 minutes and then increase that if you can. It doesn’t have to be all at once to bring benefits. It’s also a good way to engage more with aging loved ones. For example, Ross suggests creating a 3-day walking challenge. “Help them walk a few minutes each day, and increase the time daily – with a rest day every so often, of course!” This way, both of you gets some activity.

Resolution 4: Eat smart. Grabbing some grub on the run is no crime, but restaurant food (even fast food) can get expensive and isn’t always the best way to support your health and your family’s. Most major food magazines and websites feature recipes that take 30 minutes or less. And lots of grocery stores now offer online ordering, enabling you to schedule a pick-up or in some cases a home delivery.

Resolution 5: Be more social. “Social interaction is important for brain activity as well as morale,” Ross notes. Avoid caregiver isolation! In addition to seeing friends, engage in hobbies and other activities that you like – and don’t feel guilty about it! Get crafty about combining activities, like finding an art gallery, book talk or class you can attend during your parent’s weekly physical therapy appointment, or asking a friend to tag along while you’re running errands.

Resolution 6: Plan ahead. Caring for our parents often gives us an opportunity to consider our own desires for aging well. The New Year is a terrific time to jot down a few ideas about how and where you’d like to age, and then meet with your CPA, banker or financial planner to discuss what’s needed to get there. Also make sure you have the right legal documents to ensure your wishes are followed, such as durable and health care powers of attorney, wills, etc.

Resolution 7: Tackle stress. Stress has an enormous impact on our day to day quality of life, and our overall health. “Stress is like the monkey on our back, gripping your neck with its hands until you can’t breathe,” says Bobbe White, author of If Stress is Garbage, I’ve Bin There, Recycled That. That’s why it’s critical to reduce stress wherever possible. Even small things like 5 minutes of quiet breathing in your car every day, or subbing one yoga session for an exercise class helps take the edge off.

Resolution 8: Capture memories. One of the hardest things about losing a parent is wanting to hear some of their old stories or understanding family connections. This year, commit to sitting down with your older loved ones to get them to share your and their favorite memories. You may just take some notes, or you can make audio or video recordings using your cell phone. This is also a great way to get your kids engaged with their elders – young people are very adept at making excellent digital audio and video.

Resolution 9: Investigate options. Although it can feel uncomfortable, planning ahead for assisted living, long-term care and death makes going through those transitions easier for everyone. Resolve this year to investigate options for care and the monetary requirements for getting it. This includes understanding your parents’ desires and financial position, as well as your own.

Resolution 10: Increase safety for your parents. A recent study published in the Journal of Safety Research found that each year, “millions of people over 65 are treated in emergency rooms, with over 800,000 hospitalized for broken hips or head injuries, and 53% of those with fall-related hip fractures fall again within six months.” Whether your parents live independently or with you, make a point this year to learn about fall hazards, including medications and medical conditions. Then take steps to reducing the likelihood of a trip and tumble, like re-routing cables and cords and investigating a medical alert solution with fall detection.

Resolution 11: Get organized. This is another item that’s on everyone’s list of New Year’s resolutions, but it’s a good one, especially when you’re caring for aging parents. Make a short list of things that need better organization, like the kids’ homework zone, Mom’s closet or even the files on your computer. Then make a plan to complete at least one each month. If you’re not a master organizer, you probably have a friend who’s one. If you feel emotional about clearing up the clutter, you may need more structured assistance. “I see drawers and closets stuffed to the gills – and typically what is being kept is because [we] feel guilty about letting things go,” says Bill Bliesath, a professional organizer with offices in Los Angeles and Minneapolis. Someone who’s not close to you can often be more effective at helping you work through those feelings so you can make better decisions about what to keep, donate or toss.

Resolution 12: Create a family calendar. “It’s too easy to lose track of the multiple deadlines and requirements without a planner,” Bliesath notes. An old-school desk planner or calendar is useful, but online versions that reside in the cloud and are accessible from any device any time are even better. Most enable you to assign each person a color, and control access to editing. Most importantly, you can set up reminders so you don’t miss a thing. It’s also another way to get kids engaged. “Parents should be involved daily checking the planner and helping the kids keep it updated,” he adds.  “Learning good planner use skills is an incredibly valuable life lesson.”

Resolution 13: Ask for and accept help. This may be the most important New Year’s resolution of all for caregivers. None of us likes to feel needy, so we frequently forgo asking for assistance. This year, resolve to lightening your emotional and physical load as much as possible. “Start accepting help from friends, family, neighbors, and professionals who are willing to pitch in and help with caregiving,” suggests Jennifer L. FitzPatrick, founder of Generations Health in Chester, MD, and author of Cruising Through Caregiving: Reducing the Stress of Caring for Your Loved One. And don’t be afraid to ask people for specific support, like picking up your kids at school or dropping off the dry cleaning. You might even consider a ride-haling service to ferry your parent or children from one appointment to another.

Following some or all of these resolutions will make life better for you and the person you’re caring for.

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The importance of TIME in your life

SOME THOUGHTS DURING THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

 

Value your time

Once a moment is gone, you cannot get it back. Spend each one wisely, with intention, with purpose, with meaning.

Your time is more precious than just about anything else you have. For it is with time that you create, access and experience all else.

Don’t let yourself be tricked into providing it too cheaply. What appears to be a bargain in terms of money can end up imposing a terrible cost on your irreplaceable time.

Do you constantly feel you have too little time? That’s a strong indication you’re not placing a high enough value on the time you have.

Each day comes to you with plenty of time for rich, creative, meaningful living. Hold every moment to a high standard, and insist on spending them all engaged in what truly matters.

Time is your opportunity to fill life with great treasure. Make good and meaningful use of every single minute.
— Ralph Marston

 

 

Are You at Risk of Caring Too Much

Paula Spencer Scott, Caring.com senior editor wrote the following article about the 10 warning signs of “caring too much” and offers tips on what you can do to prevent caregiver burnout.

Are you at risk of caring too much? [Read more…]

How to try and be an Optimistic caregiver

8 WAYS to be a more optimistic caregiver:

From: http://www.caregiverstress.com

Some  ideas about how to feel more optimistic and resilient as  a caregiver:

  1. Look for the Good

Author Catherine Pulsifer said, “To find optimism, look for the good things in life.” This advice may be easier said than done, however it’s important to help keep the negative thoughts at bay. Try making a list each day of things that are good in your life. Some caregivers shared that they were grateful for the little things like a cool breeze, a nap, or sunshine. When problems loom large, look for the small bright spots in your life.

  1. Speak kindly – to yourself

“Don’t say anything to yourself that you wouldn’t say to anyone else,” recommends a mayoclinic.org article on positive thinking. Turning off the negative dialogue in your head can be a powerful tool to harness optimism. The first step is recognizing negative thoughts and reframing them in your mind. For example, instead of thinking, “This will never work,” you might say to yourself, “I’ll try again a different way.” Positive thinking takes practice, and with time you’ll notice fewer critical or negative thoughts popping into your mind.

  1. Lean on positive people

Surrounding yourself with positive friends and family is helpful when trying to stay upbeat yourself. Phyllis, a family caregiver, said that she is grateful for “the helpful people I have met on my journey. Their kindness is inspirational.” Seeing the positivity in others and involving them in your life can be powerful. “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with,” said the late Jim Rohn, entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. Choose to spend time with those that give you energy and positivity, not people that take it from you. If getting together in person is not possible, connect online or join a supportive online community such as the Caregiver Stress Relief community

  1. Find happiness through health

A healthy diet and exercise can go a long way to improve mood and maintain positivity in your life. Exercise can reduce stress, increase energy, and foster good sleep habits. Can’t find 30 minutes a day to exercise? Break it up into three 10-minute chunks. With today’s technology, you can find activities to get you moving online or even “On Demand” workouts

through your cable TV provider. Eating well can also impact wellbeing. Maintaining a healthy diet is a priority for Cindy, a family caregiver. “It’s probably one of the most important things to do to keep my mind sharp,” she said.

  1. Remember you are doing your best

Alzheimer’s expert Karen Garner tells caregivers on her blog to remember “…you know you did the best you could at that particular moment.” Karen was a caregiver to her husband before he passed, and said “I was entrenched in the battle of caregiving that leaves little room for luxuries like taking the time to write and read and sit quietly to reflect on all that is happening.” She reminds caregivers that they showed up when it mattered the most and were present. “At times, you may have lost your patience, but that doesn’t detract from all the other positives you have done,” she said.

  1. Laugh to lighten your load

Not only does laughter make you feel good, its positive effects stay with you long after the chuckling subsides. Research shows that laughter lowers stress hormones, relaxes muscles, improves mood, and eases anxiety. According to HelpGuide.org, “Humor helps you keep a positive, optimistic outlook through difficult situations, disappointments, and loss.” Some caregivers not only find laugher for themselves, they share it with others. Linda says that she is always grateful for “another day filled with laughter with my loved one.”

  1. Keep it simple

Sometimes, doing only what needs to be done – dishes, laundry, meals – can make the days less daunting. Don’t set unrealistic goals for yourself. Family caregiver Angela describes how she lets it go “if in fact my sofa wins the day” and she doesn’t meet her own expectations. To keep it simple, she tries to pick one thing to accomplish and focuses on that

  1. Take time for yourself

Whether it’s a quick walk around the block or meeting a friend for lunch, taking a break from caregiving duties is important for your health and wellbeing. If you’re able to take time off, it will be good for both you and your loved one. Gail is a caregiver to her father and said she is grateful for “…the care companions who do so much more than just give me some respite time. They engage Dad in a way that helps him be alert and happy.” Look to a family member, friend, or professional caregiver to give you a few hours to yourself so you can recharge and maintain an optimistic outlook.

Caregiving can be rewarding, but no caregiver breezes through the journey without feeling some degree of negativity and hopelessness creeping in. By following tips to stay positive, you may be able to transition your outlook to one of optimism and gratitude for even the smallest positive things in life.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                                  

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                              

West Hills, CA 91307

New Approach to challenging family members

Have a challenging Family member?? 

As a caregiver, remember the wise words of Albert Einstein

If your family member is challenging you and being stubborn, try a NEW approach.

SUCH AS:

— If they are not eating—   try making finger foods instead of a traditional meal with utensils…

–If a loved one refuses to bathe,  let an hour or two pass, then offer them an exchange.  If you take a shower, we’ll go out and get an ice cream cone.

–If you need a time out for yourself, arrange for your loved one to go to a senior center for day.   You might use a “geriatric fiblet”. Such as: Tell your loved one that you need to run errands, go to doctor for you annual physical exam, do some banking and go to the grocery store. It will mean getting in and out of the car at least 6 times. This is probably more times than your loved one would like to do.

The term “geriatric fiblet” was coined at the 2000 World Alzheimer’s Congress as “necessary white lies to redirect loved ones or discourage them from detrimental behavior.”

Fiblets are also used when you need some “time away from being a caregiver”.

-Give your family member a task to do on their own: such as folding clothes/towels, sorting papers, finding lids to empty containers, making a collage for your cousin, filing recipes, counting cards to see if there is a full deck, etc. Makes a person feel useful and independent.

— Set your cell phone alarm to go off every few hours.  Take a few minutes to make a call to a friend, set up a social event, go to the restroom, etc. Deep breaths will help too!

Remember- it does take a village.  Ask for help and support!

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

 For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

   23705 Vanowen St. # 216

   West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you need a break from Care-giving?

Image result for image of reliefDo you need a break from Care-giving??

Caregivers face many conflicts…balancing work, family life, and personal time (and their own health and well-being) with care-giving. It isn’t unusual for caregivers to cancel summer vacation plans due to care-giving duties or worries over what will happen if they’re gone.

There is one great solution for the caregiver vacation dilemma…respite care! But, many caregivers don’t know where to find respite care, how it works or how to make it work smoothly for a worry-free (relatively, at least) vacation.

What is respite care?

Very simply, respite care is substitute care provided to give primary caregivers a break (or respite). This can be provided in a variety of ways–at a care facility, at home or at an adult day care center–on a regular basis as a routine break or for specified periods of time. When the term respite care is used it usually refers to professional caregivers, but of course family and friends can also help provide respite care. Some support groups also arrange free respite care so that you are able to attend and facilities or services may provide temporary respite such as a “caregiver’s day out”.

Who offers respite care and how much will it cost?*

Home care companies**: estimated: $20-26/hour depending on location, needs and services.Best for: Those who wish to stay in the comfort of home, clients with Alzheimer’s/dementia (routine/familiarity), clients with visual impairment (familiar/properly arranged environment).

 Assisted Living or Nursing Facilities: $100+/day ranging through $400+ for nursing care. Best for: Cost-effective option for several days/weeks or more; typically includes meals, activities and a number of services; a good option as a trial for how a care facility may work out long-term. Each organization has their own regulations so it’s good to call/meet in advance. This usually takes some planning.

Adult Day Care Facilities (day programs may be provided by your county, specific organizations, private adult day care centers or within a care facility): $60-100/day (with subsidies available)Best for: Daytime respite for short breaks or when family/other caregivers can cover the evenings

PROFESSIONAL HELP FOR YOU:

Geriatric Care Managers:  Contact the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers @ www.aginglifecare.com  to find an LCSW that can oversee the entire process, visit your loved one as often as you what, attend doctors appointments etc, while you are taking a break .

Will I really be able to take a vacation and have any peace of mind?

Admittedly, this can be difficult and requires some mental (and literal) preparation. If you can do a test run, that helps a lot. You should also download our respite care checklist to set yourself up for success. Go to www.theeasyliving.com/ respite care- checklist to download.

If you are feeling guilty or too stressed to enjoy yourself, consider talking to someone (support group, counselor, minister, friend) about your feelings. The reality is that everything may not go perfectly, but it works out fine 90% of the time…99% of the time when you’ve tested it out and done some key preparation. A break can help you to be a better caregiver, so don’t think of this as something just for you.

Tip: Caregivers should almost always purchase travel insurance. That way if anything comes up and you do not feel like you can go on your trip, you will not lose the money (check terms and conditions). Your credit card may offer insurance on purchases and specific entities (airlines and tour companies) offer it as well as trip insurance companies. For more extensive travel (trips with multiple destinations or overseas) one of the benefits of a good travel agent is personalized assistance if you need to make changes or encounter problems.

 

 

 

Laughter makes it better sometimes

KEEP SCROLLING TO SEE ALL THE CARTOONS

‘It’s going to take me ten hours to read your care instructions and your insurance only covers an hour of care.’

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regaining your self, hope and optimism

Tips for Regaining Your Energy, Optimism, and Hope

FROM: www.helpguide.org

The demands of care-giving can be overwhelming, especially if you feel you have little control over the situation or you’re in over your head. If the stress of care-giving is left unchecked, it can take a toll on your health, relationships, and state of mind—eventually leading to burnout.

When you’re burned out, it’s tough to do anything, let alone look after someone else. That’s why taking care of yourself isn’t a luxury—it’s a necessity. Read on for tips on how to rein in the stress in your life and regain balance, joy, and hope.

What do you need to know?

Caring for a loved one can be very rewarding, but it also involves many stressors. Caregiver stress can be particularly damaging, since it is typically a chronic, long-term challenge. You may face years or even decades of care-giving responsibilities. It can be particularly disheartening when there’s no hope that your family member will get better.

If you don’t get the physical and emotional support your need, the stress of care-giving leaves you vulnerable to a wide range of problems, including depression, anxiety, and burnout. And when you get to that point, both you and the person you’re caring for suffer. That’s why managing the stress levels in your life is just as important as making sure your family member gets to his doctor’s appointment or takes her medication on time.

Signs and symptoms of caregiver stress and burnout

Learning to recognize the signs of caregiver stress and burnout is the first step to dealing with the problem.

Common signs and symptoms of caregiver stress

  • Anxiety, depression, irritability
  • Feeling tired and run down
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Overreacting to minor nuisances
  • New or worsening health problems
  • Feeling increasingly resentful
  • Drinking, smoking, or eating more
  • Neglecting responsibilities
  • Cutting back on leisure activities
  • Trouble concentrating

Common signs and symptoms of caregiver burnout

  • You have much less energy than you once had
  • It seems like you catch every cold or flu that’s going around
  • You’re constantly exhausted, even after sleeping or taking a break
  • You neglect your own needs, either because you’re too busy or you don’t care anymore
  • Your life revolves around care-giving, but it gives you little satisfaction
  • You have trouble relaxing, even when help is available
  • You’re increasingly impatient and irritable with the person you’re caring for
  • You feel helpless and hopeless

Once you burn out, care-giving is no longer a healthy option for either you or the person you’re caring for. So it’s important to watch for the warning signs of caregiver burnout and take action right away when you recognize the problem.

Don’t let care-giving take over your whole life. It’s easier to accept a difficult situation when there are other areas of your life that are rewarding. Invest in things that give you meaning and purpose—whether it’s your family, church, a favorite hobby, or your career. Read on for some additional tips to lighten the load:

Find ways to feel empowered

[Read more…]

Laughter is essential at least for a few minutes

Find your sense of humor again! 
It’s very hard finding any humor in our life, when being a caregiver zaps all of our energy.  But you must and you definitely can.

You really can find humor in any situation, but you have to allow yourself to see the funny side of it. We all need to laugh. It’s healing and it helps you to feel good even when everything else doesn’t feel so great.

Here are some ideas:

  1. Buy a joke book and put it in the bathroom as reading material!
  2. Watch one TV program a day that is purely humor.
  3. Ask yourself: Do you ever get that feeling that your guardian angel went out for a smoke and did not come back?
  4. If you can’t take the high road then just stop and eat something.
  5. Watch a cat video doing something stupid.
  6. Take time to read the comics in the daily paper.
  7. Watch reruns of The Big Bang Theory.
  8. Do something totally unexpected.
  9. Eat dessert for dinner.
  10. Take the person you are caring for out to try on hats and wigs.
  11. Find the nearest gag/joke store and start shopping! Remember to buy that whoopee cushion !

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

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Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process