21 Practical Tips for Grooming and Bathing

 

21 Tips for Grooming and Bathing for persons with PD 

from: Parkinsons’s News Today 2017

As a person’s Parkinson’s disease progresses, simple everyday tasks such as washing, grooming and going to the bathroom can become difficult due to typical Parkinson’s symptoms such as tremors or rigidity. Those living with the disease will be keen to do as much for themselves as possible and retain as much of their independence as they can, particularly when it comes to personal hygiene.

We’ve put together a list of handy tips to help people living with Parkinson’s continue to wash, groom and go to the bathroom easily and safely using information from the National Parkinsons Foundation.

Washing

  • Installing at least two fitted handrails near the bath or shower will allow the patient to grab hold of something safe and secure while getting in and out of the bath or shower. These should be professionally fitted if possible to ensure they are strong enough to support the patient’s weight.
  • A chair or bench in the shower or bathtub will help those who have trouble balancing while standing. A handheld showerhead is best used in these circumstances.
  • Make sure the water isn’t too hot.
  • Place non-slip rubber mats in the bath tub and shower cubicle.
  • Bath rugs and mats should have a rubber backing so they don’t slide across tiles.
  • Liquid soap in a pump dispenser is safer to use than hard bars of soap which can slip out of hands and leave slippery residue underfoot.
  • Install a shelf in the shower or bath area that is between knee and shoulder height for easy access to soap, shampoo, and other essential washing items.
  • Advise the patient to always take their cell phone or medical alert device into the bathroom if they’re home alone.

Grooming

  • Patients should sit down when brushing their teeth, shaving, applying makeup or drying their hair so they don’t have to worry about balance.
  • It’s important to support the upper body by resting elbows on the sink or vanity when grooming.
  • Electric devices are often better and safer to use than non-electric ones, such as toothbrushes and shavers.
  • Hands-free hair dryers can be mounted on a vanity unit.

Going to the bathroom and incontinence

  • Toilet frames or grab bars will help patients get up off the toilet safely.
  • Introduce a regular schedule for visiting the bathroom, such as every two hours or before meals.
  • Avoid drinking caffeinated drinks which may cause more frequent bathroom visits.
  • Try to avoid fluids two hours before bed.
  • Patients should use a nightlight or keep the bathroom light on during the night so they can make their way to the bathroom safely.
  • It’s advised that those with Parkinson’s attempt to fully empty their bladder each time they visit the bathroom.
  • If patients become prone to bathroom accidents, they should try using incontinence products such as pads or padded underwear.
  • Patients should seek medical advice if they experience burning or a sudden increase in frequency or urgency to urinate as this may indicate a urinary tract infection.
  • A urologist can help if patients are experiencing problems with incontinence.

Parkinsons’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

Minimize your Stress Level this Holiday Season

 

 

Minimize Stress during the upcoming Holiday Season!

What  you and your caregivers can do to minimize this stress and have at least a chance at enjoying the holidays?

  1. Put first things first. If you’ve always felt depressed during the holidays, caregiving won’t make things easier. If you get depressed from the lack of sunlight in the winter months, see your doctor. There are therapies that can help this syndrome, which is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). If you don’t have a problem with the sunlight, but still suffer seasonal depression, talking with a counselor to learn to cope with this depression is often a good idea.
  2. If you have always enjoyed the holidays, but now find them overwhelming because of too many demands on your time, you will need to learn to simplify the season. Yes, that will mean disappointing a few people, perhaps elders and children alike, but simplification is often the only choice you have, if you are to remain somewhat sane.
  3. Learn to detach from the negative feedback you may get from others because of changes you are making. Detaching simply means that you recognize the other person’s feelings, but you will not allow yourself to react or be controlled by their feelings without considering your own needs, as well. You set boundaries by telling others what you can and can’t do. You look at the situation with open eyes, perhaps get some feedback from people you think can help you, and then make your own decisions. Acknowledging your loved ones’ views, and telling them you love them, but simply can’t do it all, generally helps. If your mom says, “But we’ve always done it that way,” you say, “Yes, we have, but now our holiday has to change a little, since our lives have changed.” If your kids lay on the guilt because you can’t bake every kind of cookie they want, let them know that you want to please them, but that your time is limited now, so they can help you by being flexible. If you offer to let them help you, they may feel part of the decision, rather than brushed off. The main idea is that you don’t react to their negativity. Generally, when you stop reacting, other people will calm down.
  4. Use music as a soothing tool for all. If you have elders in nursing homes, bring them a CD player and CDs so they can play old songs they enjoy. Around the house, play Christmas tunes your kids like, but don’t forget your own needs. If you have some favorite holiday tunes on CDs, play those too. However, if you get a sick feeling every time you enter a mall because the Holiday music reminds you of all you have to do, then play other types of music at home. Do consider music of some kind. Classical music can be very therapeutic, religious music helps many, and old rock and roll or country songs may give you a boost.
  5. Soothing light can help most people relax. Obviously, candles aren’t allowed in nursing homes and likely aren’t a good idea for elders or kids. But there are many softly lit holiday decorations you can safely use, or get some indirect lamps for atmosphere. Soft lights, combined with good music, can help calm nearly anyone, including a caregiver. Try it while you bake treats, decorate your home or the elders’ homes, or do other holiday duties.
  6. Meditation can be as simple as getting up early or going to bed late. The idea is to have some quiet time for yourself. Some people like guided meditation, where music or soothing words on CD or DVD help them relax in a progressive manner. Other people prefer going outside, maybe to a park or sitting near water, if possible, to enjoy natural calm. Some folks concentrate on their breathing pattern while they repeat one soothing word. This helps them calm their overactive brain. There’s no right or wrong way to meditate, but numerous studies have shown mediation can have a healthy effect on mood, as well as physical wellbeing. Also, try to eat right and exercise. This is extra hard during the holiday season, but you can feel better if you treat your body right.
  7. Ask your spouse, a friend or relative to take over some of your duties for a time. It’s amazing how many of us think we have to do everything ourselves, even though others would help if we only asked them. When we don’t ask for help, people often don’t know we need help, or else they simply don’t know what to do.
  8. Take a trip down memory lane. Remember your parents when they were young and healthy. Remember your children when they were tiny. Remember the good times before these difficult times. When you do that, you’ll likely find a better balance in your life, because you’ll start to recognize that life is cyclical, and better times will come again.
  9. Allow yourself to feel the pain of your aging parents’ losses. As my elders aged and grew frail, I was deeply saddened by their physical and psychological pain. The holidays threw a spotlight on all the things they could no longer enjoy. This pain is real. Allow yourself to feel it. Write it down. Talk about it with other caregivers, a religious leader, or a good friend. Get it out. It’s natural, human and okay to feel the loss. If you feel bitter or angry, say so. Get it all out and don’t allow shame to enter into the equation. You have a right to all of your feelings.
  10. Let go of perfection. It’s likely that all of those holidays you remember as being so wonderful really weren’t that perfect. Every human being looks at events differently. Time skews our memories. Life wasn’t perfect thirty years ago, twenty years ago or ten years ago. It’s far from perfect now. Do your best with what you have. Take care of yourself along with the others, and your holidays will be as good as they can be. Let that be good enough.

-adapted from article written by Carol Bradley Bursack, Editor in chief, Elderlink

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address:   

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

  West Hills, CA 91307

 

Emergency Checklist Helpful Information

Emergency Checklist for Seniors and their Caregivers

How to be prepared:

We hope we’ll never need the information, but if there is an emergency this checklist readily available will make your life easier along with your family and caregivers.  SUGGESTION: insert all info into a COLORED 3 ring BINDER!

Health emergencies with our elders can often become complicated by the sheer number of medications, doctors, insurance coverage and degree of chronic or acute illness (es) involved. Below is a comprehensive list of information and documents to keep on hand, so you’ll be prepared.

Senior Care Emergency Checklist

  • Doctors’ names, their specialties and phone numbers.
  • List of all medications being taken and what the prescriptions are for (be sure to keep the information updated — as the medications may change frequently).
  • Medical insurance and prescription plans and identification numbers.
  • Social security number — many insurance companies won’t talk to anyone without the patient’s social security number.
  • Durable power of attorney— a legal document that gives someone the authority to handle legal and financial issues if your parent or elderly relative becomes incapacitated.
  • Health care proxy — a legal document that gives someone the authority to make medical decisions for your parent or elderly relative.
  • Specification of your wishes about resuscitation orders. Knowing this information before a crisis can be crucial to the way in which you handle the crisis.
  • Basic financial records — a list of assets, account numbers, names and contact information for financial advisors or bank representative.
  • Names and addresses of people to notify in case of an emergency — such as children, grandchildren, close friends and neighbors who might be able to help out.

Include list of passwords/log in information for emails/computer information.

  • Names and contact information for local clergy, if your parent or elderly relative has a preferred religious affiliation.

This information should be placed in the home in an easy-to-find location, such as near the phone in the kitchen, or in another commonly used area, as well as given to another family member, caregiver or friend who agrees to keep a copy of the information for you.

AUTHOR: Ronnie Friedland: an editor at Care.com 2017

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Visit to the Neurologist: A Check-up Checklist

Making the Most out of Your Visit to the Neurologist                                          A Check-up Checklist  

 By Lawrence I. Golbe, M.D.

People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) typically visit their neurologist two to four times a year. As you or your loved one may have experienced, it can be challenging during these rare visits to communicate all of your questions about your condition and your overall health.

How can you maximize your time with your doctor and leave your appointment confident that all your concerns have been addressed? The best thing you can do is to come equipped not only with the right information, but also with the right questions.

Start by organizing your health information and questions in advance. Arrive early so that you can complete your insurance forms and other paperwork ahead of time. Try to bring all of the items discussed below and answer all of the questions listed. These preparations can help both you and your doctor to optimize your care.

  1. What To Bring to Your Appointment
    Before you arrive, especially if it’s your first visit, be sure to ask the doctor’s office what pertinent information you should bring.

Important items will likely include:
• Notes from previous doctors’ histories and examinations
• Lab/test reports
• Films or CDs of brain imaging (not just the radiologists’ reports)
• Information about your medication history (For each medication, it is helpful to know the duration of treatment and the maximum dosage in the past, as well as any benefits or side effects you may have experienced)

Upon your arrival, give your nurse or doctor any other paperwork that may require your doctor’s signature.

Examples of such items include:
•  A list of prescriptions to be refilled
•  Disability forms to be completed
•  Request for handicapped parking
•  Anything else that requires the doctor’s sign-off  (e.g., request to be excused from work)

  1. What Information to Share
    During your visit, share with your doctor details about your medications, your Parkinson’s symptoms (new and existing) and other health issues you may be experiencing. It may be helpful to make a list of each problem area in advance to make sure you don’t leave anything out.

[Read more…]

Travel tips for accessible and safe travel

ACCESSIBLE TRAVEL TIPS

Travel by people with disabilities, also known as “disabled travel” or “accessible travel,” is on the rise. The travel industry is waking up to disabled travelers’ special needs by providing more services and greater accommodation. Meanwhile, the sheer abundance of information on accessible travel is astounding — much of it generated by disabled travelers themselves.

The Americans with Disabilities Act guarantees that travelers with disabilities receive equal treatment under the law. While this would be the case in a perfect world, it doesn’t always work out that way in real life, especially in foreign countries where accessibility regulations vary widely. Despite having common sense, considerable public sentiment and strength in numbers, travelers with disabilities frequently face inadequate facilities, prejudice, misinformation, general hassles and higher prices than other travelers.

Compounding the problem is the fact that there are as many disabilities as there are disabled folks. Each person’s needs are a little different, and traveling in cookie-cutter airline seats, hotel rooms and rental car fleets can be very tricky. The following tips and resources will help disabled travelers and their companions anticipate some of the snags of accessible travel.

Disabled Travel Tips

1. Call ahead. Service providers are required by law in many cases to accommodate travelers with special needs. However, most need some time to make the necessary arrangements. Mention your needs at the time of reservation, and call the provider 24 to 48 hours before your arrival to confirm that proper accommodations have been made.

  1. Be specific and clear when describing a disability. Not all service providers know the “lingo” of accessible travel, or the medical terms for certain conditions. Give as many details as you can about what you can and can’t do, and don’t downplay the severity of the disability. The more information a service provider has, the better they will be able to accommodate you. If they promise you certain accommodations, try to get these promises in writing.
  2. Be specific and clear when describing the trip to your doctor. A doctor can often prescribe measures for coping with an unusually long flight, limited medical facilities at your destination, the unavailability of prescription drugs and other pitfalls of traveling. Be prepared — in some cases, your doctor may question the advisability of travel.
  3. Take a doctor’s note and phone number. Travel with a statement from your doctor, preferably on letterhead, covering your condition, medications, potential complications, special needs and other pertinent information. Be sure you have a number where your doctor (or another medical professional) can be reached in an emergency situation at any hour of the day.

Safety and Health Tips for Travelers

  1. Bring extra medication. Many experts advise that you travel with two complete packages of essential medication in case of emergency. Store all medications and other necessary medical suppliesin your carry-on bag.
  2. Investigate physician availability where you will be traveling. Your doctor, health careprovider, insurance company or local embassy can provide the names and contact numbers of physicians at your destination. For more information, see Health Care Abroad.
  3. Carry medical alert information, preferably in a place that a medical professional or anyone who assists you will find easily (wallet card, necklace, close to your identification).
  4. Consider using a specialist travel agent. Some agents provide stellar niche services; one might be very experienced in working with hearing-impaired travelers, another with developmentally impaired travelers. Since the requirements for these varied travelers can be staggeringly different, it helps to find someone who knows the ropes. Check the agent search feature at TravelSense.orgto find qualified travel agents across the U.S.
  5. Avoid connecting flights. Although wheelchairs are the last items to be checked into the luggage compartments, and thus first to be pulled off, flying direct can save you unnecessary time and hassle. One exception: If you have trouble maneuvering into airplane lavatories, long flights may become uncomfortable — so a series of shorter flights might be a better option. If you do choose to connect, be sure to allow plenty of time between flights (we’d recommend at least 90 minutes, or two hours if you need to go through customs or security) to get from one gate to the next.

Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

-Allow plenty of time before your flight to check in, get through security and transfer to your gate. Arrive at least two hours before a domestic flight and three hours before an international flight — more if you’re traveling at a peak time.Check in with your flight attendant before your plane lands to make a plan for exit.

-Don’t forget about transportation to and from the airport. If you have a wheelchair, make arrangements in advance to have an accessible vehicle pick you up in your destination city.

-Bring spare parts and tools. Wheelchairs can take tremendous abuse while traveling; assemble a small kit of spare partsand tools for emergency repairs. You may also be required to dismantle a wheelchair for certain flights or activities; make sure you and your traveling companions know how to do this.

-Know your rights. Before going through airport security, be aware of the TSA’s rules   for travelers with disabilities and medical conditions. See also the U.S. Department of Transportation’s guide to the rights of travelers with disabilities.

Be creative. Reader Dorothy Dean, who has a mobility disability, wrote to us with the following suggestion: “When traveling by car, I can use a bariatric walker in lieu of grab bars in the bathroom. You simply walk it up to the toilet, put it in place against the toilet, turn around, sit down and you have sturdy arms to use for getting up. It’s a little uncomfortable but is fine for travel.” Dean notes that this tip works best with large, sturdy walkers that have hand holds designed to help people rise, not just walk: “I would never use my regular walker to get up from a toilet,” she wrote.

Useful Websites and Resources

For more information on traveling with all types of disabilities, check out the websites and other resources below.

Accessible Journeys: Tour operator for slow walkers, wheelchair travelers and their companions

Accomable: A guide to accessible lodging around the world

Barrier-FreeCruising.com: Tips and resources for disabled cruise travelers

CruiseCritic.com: Info on cruising with a disability

DisabledTravelers.com: Comprehensive listing of accessible travel specialists around the world

Disabled Traveler’s Guide to the World: Travel tips and destination guides for disabled travelers

Emerging Horizons: An online quarterly newsletter providing a wide range of information for mobility-impaired travelers

Gimp on the Go: Destination guides, travel tips, photo gallery and resources for disabled travelers

Limitless Travel: U.K.-based company offering accessible tours in Europe

TravelGuides.org: A wealth of tour operators, travel agents, hotels, attractions and more that cater to disabled travelers

Travel on the Level: Tips and destination recommendations for travelers looking for less strenuous walking and fewer stairs

World on Wheelz: Agency specializing in accessible getaways for wheelchair travelers, slow walkers and seniors with special needs

 

VA Establishes Six Parkinson’s Disease Centers

 

VA Establishes Six Parkinson’s Disease Centers

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurologic disorders.  It affects roughly 1.5 million Americans.  The main signs are tremor, stiffness of the body, slowness of movement, and difficulty with balance.  It is believed to be caused by a deficiency of a brain chemical called dopamine.  Although there is no cure for PD at the present time, some medication and surgical treatments can dramatically improve many of the symptoms.

The Veterans Health Administration treats an estimated 40,000 veterans with PD each year.  In 2001, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs strengthened its commitment to veterans with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and related movement disorders by establishing the Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECCs) network.  This network supports six PD Centers of Excellence located in  Portland/Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, Richmond, and Philadelphia (see map).  Each PADRECC is designed to deliver state-of-the art clinical care, innovative research, and outreach and education programs to its surrounding region, also referred to as their “service area”. Los Angeles (Southwest) PADRECC Director, Jeff Bronstein, MD, PhD
Phone: 310-268-3975

Parkinson’s Disease

The Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Center

(PADRECC) at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare Center

provides comprehensive care to patients with Parkinson’s disease

and other movement disorders.The Center specializes in applying

advanced surgical techniques to the treatment of —

·   Parkinson’s disease

·   essential tremor

·   dystonia

·   other movement disorders

Services Offered Services offered by the Center include —

extensive neurological and neurosurgical evaluation to determine if a

patient is an appropriate  candidate for surgical treatment

·systematic pre-operative testing of patients deemed to be candidates

for surgical treatment

  • surgical treatment
  • pallidotomy, a procedure which can signficantly improve most
  • signs of Parkinson’s disease  and thalamotomy,                                                                                               effective in reducing tremors

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, please support our efforts. You can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org  and our mailing address is below! Thank you.

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216       West Hills, California 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Summer days are here. For many, that means a summer trip or enjoying the extra sunlight to try a new outdoor activity. Summer is also the time to get your vitamin D. Did you know that our bodies can store Vitamin D from the summer to last through the winter?

Fun in the Sun

Know your spots. Look for a skin growth, mole or beauty mark that changes in size, color or texture.
Look for “sun sensitivity” listed on medication warning labels, which can increase your chances of sunburns.
Every day before leaving your house use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more.

Prevent Overheating

When outside, stay hydrated. Drink water even if you are not thirsty.
Exercise Smart. Try to exercise outdoors in the early morning or late afternoon when it’s cooler.
Know the signs of heat stroke: flushed face, high body temperature, headache, nausea, rapid pulse, dizziness and confusion.

Traveling Tips

Bring your Aware in Care hospitalization kit,  ID bracelet and card everywhere. Order your free Aware in Care kit at www.awareincare.org.
Rest the day before your trip AND the first full day you arrive.

 

For additional  more travel advice, sun safety tips and how to avoid heat exhaustion go to www.3parkinson.org

Say yes to traveling this summer with these savvy tips

Don’t delay!! Make those summer travel plans now!

Here are some tips for making traveling easier for you.

Your difficulties do not have to interfere with traveling, which should be an enjoyable experience and not limited or avoided because of you or your loved one’s disease. But planning ahead is key to avoid these difficulties. The following guidelines should help to make your next trip anxiety-free.

Tips for Traveling with a movement disorder 

Always try to travel with a companion.

  • Place the names of your doctor, insurance company, emergency contact, and medications in your wallet or purse.
  • Carry identification stating that you have a neurological disease.
  • Use a “fanny” pack or backpack so that you have both hands free to balance as you walk, especially if walking any distance.
  • Pack snacks and carry a water bottle to take medications.
  • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing and good walking shoes.
  • When making hotel reservations, request a room on the ground floor or near an elevator. Ask if they have rooms that are handicapped-accessible; these usually include grab bars in the shower and bathroom and have wider spaces between furniture for wheelchair access.

Traveling With Medications

  • Always have at least a day’s dosage of medication in your pocket or purse.
  • Try to carry all of your medications with you, in the event that your luggage gets misplaced.
  • Pack enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Do not rely on out-of-town, or especially out-of-the-country, pharmacies for refills.
  • Check with your doctor about any over-the-counter drugs, such as those for motion sickness or diarrhea, before you leave.
  • Find out if your medications are “sun-sensitive” and plan accordingly.
  • Carry a list and schedule of medications with you.
  • If possible, use a watch with an alarm or an alarm pillbox. If you are traveling with time changes it may be difficult for you to remember on your own.

Travel by Car

  • Many medications can cause drowsiness, particularly after eating. If you are driving, take a nap before you go and avoid eating for two to three hours before departing.
  • Do not overestimate you abilities. While you may be capable of driving short distances to and from home, a longer road trip may require much more stamina. Either break the trip up into shorter distances with frequent stops, or share the driving with someone else.

Travel by Air

  • Request a non-stop flight and an aisle seat.
  • Check as many bags as possible, but remember to keep your medications in your carry-on.
  • Use airport shuttles, or ask for a wheelchair if your gate is a far distance.
  • Ask for early seating for a few extra minutes to board and get comfortable.
  • Use the bathroom before you get on the plane. Airplane bathrooms are often small and not handicapped-accessible.
  • If you are on a restricted diet, request a special meal in advance.

Travel by Bus or Train

  • Wheelchair lifts are generally available for entrances and exits.
  • Seats can generally be removed to accommodate wheelchairs.
  • Try to get an aisle seat near the exit to make getting on and off easier.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, research and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where to Donate Durable Medical Equipment

The Durable Medical Equipment Aid center

If you or someone you knows would like to donate durable medical equipment that you no longer use or need, here is a SFV organization that will repair, clean and give the equipment to someone in the community who really needs it.. at no charge!

They will even pick your items!!

It is a non-profit organization:

The Durable Medical Equipment Aid

www.thedme.org

19528 Ventura Blvd  # 430

Tarzana, Ca 91356

818 298-9893

Ask for Nilo. She is the owner and director. Please let Nilo know that you received the information from The NeuroCommunity Foundation.  Thank you.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources for Seniors

HELPFUL INFORMATION

Below are some great resources for Seniors:  Click on the green title and it should take you directly to the webpage. If your computer is NOT set up to go directly to links, we recommend that you adjust your settings in your computer.

Transportation Resources for Older Adults
Selling a Home with Modifications for Older Adults
Fall Prevention
Assistive Technology Buying Guide
Home Organization for Newly Disabled Seniors
Special Needs Seniors: Planning for the Future of this Vulnerable Population
Legal Guide for Newly Disabled Seniors

The above information was received by: ForeverCurious  a group of educators and librarians who curate information online.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Support us when you shop for back-to-school items.

Just Click Here and Shop

Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process