Your Visit to the Neurologist: A Check-up Checklist

Making the Most out of Your Visit to the Neurologist                                          A Check-up Checklist  

 By Lawrence I. Golbe, M.D.

People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) typically visit their neurologist two to four times a year. As you or your loved one may have experienced, it can be challenging during these rare visits to communicate all of your questions about your condition and your overall health.

How can you maximize your time with your doctor and leave your appointment confident that all your concerns have been addressed? The best thing you can do is to come equipped not only with the right information, but also with the right questions.

Start by organizing your health information and questions in advance. Arrive early so that you can complete your insurance forms and other paperwork ahead of time. Try to bring all of the items discussed below and answer all of the questions listed. These preparations can help both you and your doctor to optimize your care.

  1. What To Bring to Your Appointment
    Before you arrive, especially if it’s your first visit, be sure to ask the doctor’s office what pertinent information you should bring.

Important items will likely include:
• Notes from previous doctors’ histories and examinations
• Lab/test reports
• Films or CDs of brain imaging (not just the radiologists’ reports)
• Information about your medication history (For each medication, it is helpful to know the duration of treatment and the maximum dosage in the past, as well as any benefits or side effects you may have experienced)

Upon your arrival, give your nurse or doctor any other paperwork that may require your doctor’s signature.

Examples of such items include:
•  A list of prescriptions to be refilled
•  Disability forms to be completed
•  Request for handicapped parking
•  Anything else that requires the doctor’s sign-off  (e.g., request to be excused from work)

  1. What Information to Share
    During your visit, share with your doctor details about your medications, your Parkinson’s symptoms (new and existing) and other health issues you may be experiencing. It may be helpful to make a list of each problem area in advance to make sure you don’t leave anything out.

[Read more…]

Travel tips for accessible and safe travel

ACCESSIBLE TRAVEL TIPS

Travel by people with disabilities, also known as “disabled travel” or “accessible travel,” is on the rise. The travel industry is waking up to disabled travelers’ special needs by providing more services and greater accommodation. Meanwhile, the sheer abundance of information on accessible travel is astounding — much of it generated by disabled travelers themselves.

The Americans with Disabilities Act guarantees that travelers with disabilities receive equal treatment under the law. While this would be the case in a perfect world, it doesn’t always work out that way in real life, especially in foreign countries where accessibility regulations vary widely. Despite having common sense, considerable public sentiment and strength in numbers, travelers with disabilities frequently face inadequate facilities, prejudice, misinformation, general hassles and higher prices than other travelers.

Compounding the problem is the fact that there are as many disabilities as there are disabled folks. Each person’s needs are a little different, and traveling in cookie-cutter airline seats, hotel rooms and rental car fleets can be very tricky. The following tips and resources will help disabled travelers and their companions anticipate some of the snags of accessible travel.

Disabled Travel Tips

1. Call ahead. Service providers are required by law in many cases to accommodate travelers with special needs. However, most need some time to make the necessary arrangements. Mention your needs at the time of reservation, and call the provider 24 to 48 hours before your arrival to confirm that proper accommodations have been made.

  1. Be specific and clear when describing a disability. Not all service providers know the “lingo” of accessible travel, or the medical terms for certain conditions. Give as many details as you can about what you can and can’t do, and don’t downplay the severity of the disability. The more information a service provider has, the better they will be able to accommodate you. If they promise you certain accommodations, try to get these promises in writing.
  2. Be specific and clear when describing the trip to your doctor. A doctor can often prescribe measures for coping with an unusually long flight, limited medical facilities at your destination, the unavailability of prescription drugs and other pitfalls of traveling. Be prepared — in some cases, your doctor may question the advisability of travel.
  3. Take a doctor’s note and phone number. Travel with a statement from your doctor, preferably on letterhead, covering your condition, medications, potential complications, special needs and other pertinent information. Be sure you have a number where your doctor (or another medical professional) can be reached in an emergency situation at any hour of the day.

Safety and Health Tips for Travelers

  1. Bring extra medication. Many experts advise that you travel with two complete packages of essential medication in case of emergency. Store all medications and other necessary medical suppliesin your carry-on bag.
  2. Investigate physician availability where you will be traveling. Your doctor, health careprovider, insurance company or local embassy can provide the names and contact numbers of physicians at your destination. For more information, see Health Care Abroad.
  3. Carry medical alert information, preferably in a place that a medical professional or anyone who assists you will find easily (wallet card, necklace, close to your identification).
  4. Consider using a specialist travel agent. Some agents provide stellar niche services; one might be very experienced in working with hearing-impaired travelers, another with developmentally impaired travelers. Since the requirements for these varied travelers can be staggeringly different, it helps to find someone who knows the ropes. Check the agent search feature at TravelSense.orgto find qualified travel agents across the U.S.
  5. Avoid connecting flights. Although wheelchairs are the last items to be checked into the luggage compartments, and thus first to be pulled off, flying direct can save you unnecessary time and hassle. One exception: If you have trouble maneuvering into airplane lavatories, long flights may become uncomfortable — so a series of shorter flights might be a better option. If you do choose to connect, be sure to allow plenty of time between flights (we’d recommend at least 90 minutes, or two hours if you need to go through customs or security) to get from one gate to the next.

Ways to Survive a Long-Haul Flight

-Allow plenty of time before your flight to check in, get through security and transfer to your gate. Arrive at least two hours before a domestic flight and three hours before an international flight — more if you’re traveling at a peak time.Check in with your flight attendant before your plane lands to make a plan for exit.

-Don’t forget about transportation to and from the airport. If you have a wheelchair, make arrangements in advance to have an accessible vehicle pick you up in your destination city.

-Bring spare parts and tools. Wheelchairs can take tremendous abuse while traveling; assemble a small kit of spare partsand tools for emergency repairs. You may also be required to dismantle a wheelchair for certain flights or activities; make sure you and your traveling companions know how to do this.

-Know your rights. Before going through airport security, be aware of the TSA’s rules   for travelers with disabilities and medical conditions. See also the U.S. Department of Transportation’s guide to the rights of travelers with disabilities.

Be creative. Reader Dorothy Dean, who has a mobility disability, wrote to us with the following suggestion: “When traveling by car, I can use a bariatric walker in lieu of grab bars in the bathroom. You simply walk it up to the toilet, put it in place against the toilet, turn around, sit down and you have sturdy arms to use for getting up. It’s a little uncomfortable but is fine for travel.” Dean notes that this tip works best with large, sturdy walkers that have hand holds designed to help people rise, not just walk: “I would never use my regular walker to get up from a toilet,” she wrote.

Useful Websites and Resources

For more information on traveling with all types of disabilities, check out the websites and other resources below.

Accessible Journeys: Tour operator for slow walkers, wheelchair travelers and their companions

Accomable: A guide to accessible lodging around the world

Barrier-FreeCruising.com: Tips and resources for disabled cruise travelers

CruiseCritic.com: Info on cruising with a disability

DisabledTravelers.com: Comprehensive listing of accessible travel specialists around the world

Disabled Traveler’s Guide to the World: Travel tips and destination guides for disabled travelers

Emerging Horizons: An online quarterly newsletter providing a wide range of information for mobility-impaired travelers

Gimp on the Go: Destination guides, travel tips, photo gallery and resources for disabled travelers

Limitless Travel: U.K.-based company offering accessible tours in Europe

TravelGuides.org: A wealth of tour operators, travel agents, hotels, attractions and more that cater to disabled travelers

Travel on the Level: Tips and destination recommendations for travelers looking for less strenuous walking and fewer stairs

World on Wheelz: Agency specializing in accessible getaways for wheelchair travelers, slow walkers and seniors with special needs

 

VA Establishes Six Parkinson’s Disease Centers

 

VA Establishes Six Parkinson’s Disease Centers

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one of the most common neurologic disorders.  It affects roughly 1.5 million Americans.  The main signs are tremor, stiffness of the body, slowness of movement, and difficulty with balance.  It is believed to be caused by a deficiency of a brain chemical called dopamine.  Although there is no cure for PD at the present time, some medication and surgical treatments can dramatically improve many of the symptoms.

The Veterans Health Administration treats an estimated 40,000 veterans with PD each year.  In 2001, the Department of Veterans’ Affairs strengthened its commitment to veterans with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and related movement disorders by establishing the Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center (PADRECCs) network.  This network supports six PD Centers of Excellence located in  Portland/Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Houston, Richmond, and Philadelphia (see map).  Each PADRECC is designed to deliver state-of-the art clinical care, innovative research, and outreach and education programs to its surrounding region, also referred to as their “service area”. Los Angeles (Southwest) PADRECC Director, Jeff Bronstein, MD, PhD
Phone: 310-268-3975

Parkinson’s Disease

The Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Center

(PADRECC) at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare Center

provides comprehensive care to patients with Parkinson’s disease

and other movement disorders.The Center specializes in applying

advanced surgical techniques to the treatment of —

·   Parkinson’s disease

·   essential tremor

·   dystonia

·   other movement disorders

Services Offered Services offered by the Center include —

extensive neurological and neurosurgical evaluation to determine if a

patient is an appropriate  candidate for surgical treatment

·systematic pre-operative testing of patients deemed to be candidates

for surgical treatment

  • surgical treatment
  • pallidotomy, a procedure which can signficantly improve most
  • signs of Parkinson’s disease  and thalamotomy,                                                                                               effective in reducing tremors

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, please support our efforts. You can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org  and our mailing address is below! Thank you.

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code. 

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

23705 Vanowen St. # 216       West Hills, California 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Summer days are here. For many, that means a summer trip or enjoying the extra sunlight to try a new outdoor activity. Summer is also the time to get your vitamin D. Did you know that our bodies can store Vitamin D from the summer to last through the winter?

Fun in the Sun

Know your spots. Look for a skin growth, mole or beauty mark that changes in size, color or texture.
Look for “sun sensitivity” listed on medication warning labels, which can increase your chances of sunburns.
Every day before leaving your house use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more.

Prevent Overheating

When outside, stay hydrated. Drink water even if you are not thirsty.
Exercise Smart. Try to exercise outdoors in the early morning or late afternoon when it’s cooler.
Know the signs of heat stroke: flushed face, high body temperature, headache, nausea, rapid pulse, dizziness and confusion.

Traveling Tips

Bring your Aware in Care hospitalization kit,  ID bracelet and card everywhere. Order your free Aware in Care kit at www.awareincare.org.
Rest the day before your trip AND the first full day you arrive.

 

For additional  more travel advice, sun safety tips and how to avoid heat exhaustion go to www.3parkinson.org

Say yes to traveling this summer with these savvy tips

Don’t delay!! Make those summer travel plans now!

Here are some tips for making traveling easier for you.

Your difficulties do not have to interfere with traveling, which should be an enjoyable experience and not limited or avoided because of you or your loved one’s disease. But planning ahead is key to avoid these difficulties. The following guidelines should help to make your next trip anxiety-free.

Tips for Traveling with a movement disorder 

Always try to travel with a companion.

  • Place the names of your doctor, insurance company, emergency contact, and medications in your wallet or purse.
  • Carry identification stating that you have a neurological disease.
  • Use a “fanny” pack or backpack so that you have both hands free to balance as you walk, especially if walking any distance.
  • Pack snacks and carry a water bottle to take medications.
  • Wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing and good walking shoes.
  • When making hotel reservations, request a room on the ground floor or near an elevator. Ask if they have rooms that are handicapped-accessible; these usually include grab bars in the shower and bathroom and have wider spaces between furniture for wheelchair access.

Traveling With Medications

  • Always have at least a day’s dosage of medication in your pocket or purse.
  • Try to carry all of your medications with you, in the event that your luggage gets misplaced.
  • Pack enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Do not rely on out-of-town, or especially out-of-the-country, pharmacies for refills.
  • Check with your doctor about any over-the-counter drugs, such as those for motion sickness or diarrhea, before you leave.
  • Find out if your medications are “sun-sensitive” and plan accordingly.
  • Carry a list and schedule of medications with you.
  • If possible, use a watch with an alarm or an alarm pillbox. If you are traveling with time changes it may be difficult for you to remember on your own.

Travel by Car

  • Many medications can cause drowsiness, particularly after eating. If you are driving, take a nap before you go and avoid eating for two to three hours before departing.
  • Do not overestimate you abilities. While you may be capable of driving short distances to and from home, a longer road trip may require much more stamina. Either break the trip up into shorter distances with frequent stops, or share the driving with someone else.

Travel by Air

  • Request a non-stop flight and an aisle seat.
  • Check as many bags as possible, but remember to keep your medications in your carry-on.
  • Use airport shuttles, or ask for a wheelchair if your gate is a far distance.
  • Ask for early seating for a few extra minutes to board and get comfortable.
  • Use the bathroom before you get on the plane. Airplane bathrooms are often small and not handicapped-accessible.
  • If you are on a restricted diet, request a special meal in advance.

Travel by Bus or Train

  • Wheelchair lifts are generally available for entrances and exits.
  • Seats can generally be removed to accommodate wheelchairs.
  • Try to get an aisle seat near the exit to make getting on and off easier.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, research and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where to Donate Durable Medical Equipment

The Durable Medical Equipment Aid center

If you or someone you knows would like to donate durable medical equipment that you no longer use or need, here is a SFV organization that will repair, clean and give the equipment to someone in the community who really needs it.. at no charge!

They will even pick your items!!

It is a non-profit organization:

The Durable Medical Equipment Aid

www.thedme.org

19528 Ventura Blvd  # 430

Tarzana, Ca 91356

818 298-9893

Ask for Nilo. She is the owner and director. Please let Nilo know that you received the information from The NeuroCommunity Foundation.  Thank you.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources for Seniors

HELPFUL INFORMATION

Below are some great resources for Seniors:  Click on the green title and it should take you directly to the webpage. If your computer is NOT set up to go directly to links, we recommend that you adjust your settings in your computer.

Transportation Resources for Older Adults
Selling a Home with Modifications for Older Adults
Fall Prevention
Assistive Technology Buying Guide
Home Organization for Newly Disabled Seniors
Special Needs Seniors: Planning for the Future of this Vulnerable Population
Legal Guide for Newly Disabled Seniors

The above information was received by: ForeverCurious  a group of educators and librarians who curate information online.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

Exercise and Activities in SFV to manage neurological symptoms

 

Exercise Routines And Activities To Manage Symptoms And Improve Quality Of Life

Live broadcast of Yoga for Parkinson’s with Renee Le Verrier, RYT

Pomona: Casa Colina Parkinson’s Disease Speech and Exercise Group

Azusa: Casa Colina Parkinson’s Disease Speech and Exercise Group

Pasadena: group and private fitness classes, cardio, Pilates, restorative yoga, Gyrotonic Expansion System®, and meditation with Leslie Frank, DPT (neurological program and multiple sclerosis program)

San Gabriel & San Fernando Valleys, Ventura County: fitness and targeted exercises for neurological disorders with Lori Michiel, NASM-CPT

Tarzana and Encino: aqua fitness with Deborah Goldberger (also private and semi-private instruction in your pool)

Encino: adult fitness classes including Tai Chi & Chi Qong at Balboa Sports Center, LA City Recreation and Parks

Northridge: therapeutic exercises on land and in the water at the Center of Achievement Through Adapted Physical Activity at California State University, Northridge (CSUN)

Northridge: Laughter Yoga with Shelley Bell, CLYL, CLYT

West Hills: art therapy with Alison Paolini

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County: Neurotherapeutic Yoga with Colleen Carroll, YT

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County: Nordic Walking with Carol H. Prata

Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley, Santa Barbara: therapeutic and intergenerational orchestra with MusicMendsMinds

Tarzana: Invertigo Dance Theatre is ready to bring its Dancing Through Parkinson’s

Westlake Village: weekly exercise class/Debbie Jew, coordinator
1st Friday of month – Exercise2nd Friday of month – Music Therapy with Debbie Sipos
3rd Friday of month – “Chair” yoga with Jamie Hampton4th Friday of month – Tai Chi with Nora Li

Ventura County: PD Fighters non-contact Rock Steady Boxing Method with Jennifer Parkinson

Ventura County: Laughter Wellness with Arlene Raisner, CLYL

Newbury Park: Anytime Fitness 24-hour gym great workout classes recommended by Judy C.

Camarillo: Mindfullness with Holly Sacks

Camarillo, Ventura: Art of Moving for PD and movement disorders with Camille Torgeson

Camarillo: Focus on Balance, Tai Chi for Rehabilitation, Tai Chi Sun, Aqua Exercise with Camille Torgeson

Ventura: Focus on Balance, Tai Chi for Rehabilitiation, Tai Chi Sun, Walking with Camille Torgeson

Santa Barbara: Move to Connect for PD with Leslie Sack and Ruth Wishengrad

 

Happiness is how I arrange my mind

OH MY , I REALLY DO HAVE A CHOICE !!

by our own Joan W.

The 92-year-old, petite, well-poised and proud lady, who is fully dressed each morning by eight o’clock, with her hair fashionably coiffed  and makeup perfectly applied, even though she is legally blind, moved to a nursing home today.

Her husband of 70 years recently passed away, making the move necessary.

After many hours of waiting patiently in the lobby of the nursing home,she smiled sweetly when told her room was ready.

As she maneuvered her walker to the elevator, I provided a visual description of her tiny room, including the eyelet sheets that had been hung on her window.

I love it,” she stated with the enthusiasm of an eight-year-old having just been presented with a new puppy.

“Mrs. Jones, you haven’t seen the room, just wait.” “That doesn’t have anything to do with it,” she replied.  “Happiness is something you decide on ahead of time. Whether I like my room or not doesn’t depend on how the furniture is arranged… it’s how I arrange my mind.

I already decided to love it “It’s a decision I make every morning when I wake up. I have a choice; I can spend the day in bed recounting the difficulty I have with the parts of my body that no longer work, or get out of bed and be thankful for the ones that do.

Each day is a gift, and as long as my eyes open I’ll focus on the new day and all the happy memories I’ve stored away just for this time in my life.

Old age is like a bank account: you withdraw from what you’ve put in.

So, my advice to you would be to deposit a lot of happiness in the Bank account of memories.

I am still depositing. Now, have yourself a beautiful day. In gratitude for every moment,   warmest regards from Joan

Obtaining Your Medical Records when your MD is not available

 How to obtain your medical records,when your MD is no longer available.

 Reprinted from  https://www.verywell.com  by Trisha Torrey  March 20, 2017

Doctors don’t stay in practice forever. Just like the rest of us, they change jobs, retire, move, or even die. If you can’t find your doctor, it may be more difficult to get the medical records you’re looking for.

Obtaining copies of your medical records can be a challenge, but it’s possible to find them if you’re persistent. There are a variety of steps you can take; some are easy and others rather difficult.

[Read more…]

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Support us when you shop for back-to-school items.

Just Click Here and Shop

Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process