Study shows Horseback riding improves balance

Study Shows Therapeutic Horseback Riding (Hippotherapy) Improves Balance and More in People with MS

Source: http://www.nationalmssociety.org

SUMMARY

DETAILS
Background: Hippotherapy literally means “treatment with the help of the horse” from the Greek word “hippos,” meaning horse. This type of treatment uses a horse’s movements to achieve therapeutic goals. Physical therapists use hippotherapy to work on an individual’s balance and postural control; occupational therapists use it to work on fine motor control, attention and sensory integration; and speech-language therapists use the sessions to stimulate communication and cognitive skills.

The Study: In this study, 70 participants with MS and lower limb spasticity from five centers in Germany were randomly assigned to receive standard care plus one ½-hour session of hippotherapy per week, or just standard care, for 12 weeks. The primary outcome being measured was the effect on balance, and secondary outcomes included measures of fatigue, quality of life, pain and spasticity.

The results show that compared to the control group just receiving standard care, those who received hippotherapy plus standard care improved significantly in measures of balance, fatigue, spasticity and quality of life. Both groups experienced reductions in pain.
In terms of safety, one person in the hippotherapy group fell off the therapy horse but was able to continue the study. Two participants in the hippotherapy group experienced an MS relapse accompanied by painful muscle contractions.

The team (Vanessa Vermöhlen, University of Cologne, Germany, and colleagues) report their findings in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal (Published online August 3, 2017, available via Open Access).

Read more: Whether you enroll in an official therapeutic program or are just looking for venues in your community for access to horseback riding, the American Hippotherapy Association and the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship can provide information and resources.
COPY AND PASTE   www: momentummagazineonline.com  into your search engine       to read about “HORSE POWER”
 

 

 

MS newly diagnosed at age 70

Diagnosed at 70; that’s good news!

By Connie from Arkansas

I always knew that if I lived long enough, I would become famous for something! I am the oldest living newly diagnosed person at two different MS clinics. I was diagnosed three years ago at age 70 in Denver, Colorado.

When my first symptoms appeared – slurring words, stumbling gait, and moving in slow motion – a mild stroke was the first suspicion. With this in mind, my family practitioner sent me to the hospital.

After two days of tests, the neurology team came into my room to bring me the grim news. I did not have a stroke. It was multiple sclerosis. I startled them by breathing a sigh of relief and then starting to laugh. I tried to explain that they had just told me that I did not have a stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, cancer, or congestive heart failure. I could handle multiple sclerosis!

Suddenly, a lot of physical occurrences over the last thirty to forty years started to make sense. I had experienced the blurred vision, stumbling, periods of extreme fatigue, and one bad episode in 1985 when my right side became numb.

I was fortunate in that I chose dietetics for my major in college, teaching me how to eat healthy foods and to exercise. After a skiing accident, which led to six surgeries and a lot of nuts and bolts in both legs, I started swimming laps and attending water aerobics classes. I truly believe that water aerobics is one of the reasons I am still in relatively good shape at the age of 73. It is a wonderful program for keeping your muscles flexible and keeping you moving without additional stress.

Interestingly, my arms became numb about two months after I stopped taking estrogen tablets. I had read that a woman with MS feels very good when she is pregnant, at which time her estrogen levels are raised. I consulted a doctor friend, and despite information about potential heart problems, I went back on a low dose of estrogen. Within two months, my arms were no longer numb.

As for the memory loss, at my age it is difficult to determine if the memory loss is due to the MS or just old age. Most of my friends have similar problems. I simply buy more yellow stickies! (Also known as “Post-it®,” notes, used to leave little reminders around the house.)

Of course, I do need to prepare for whatever is ahead of me. I purchased a one-level house with no steps anywhere. I have taken doors off, put in sliding doors, hanging pot racks, slide-out shelves, and have generally made the home wheelchair accessible. My theory is, “If I am ready, it won’t happen; if I’m not, it will.”

I relate to Teri Garr, her symptoms, and her outlook; her story has convinced me that I am on the right track. I keep my eye out for new adventures, I keep laughing, I cheer up my friends when they get a sympathetic look, and above all, I surround myself with upbeat people.

I truly feel that in spite of the MS, I am a survivor, and one of the lucky ones! My husband says, “You are easy to live with 98 percent of the time!” I have a doctor who tells me, “You are in really good shape for the shape you are in!” And I have three sons who simply call me, “One tough old broad.” It doesn’t get much better than that.

Editor’s note: Connie’s decision to stay on estrogen is based on her own, personal experience; MSAA does not promote any specific drug or treatment; readers are cautioned not to make any changes to their treatment regimens without consulting their physician.

The power of a positive attitude

The Power of a Positive Attitude

What if you could change one thing about yourself that was proven, time and time again, to have a significant positive impact on your business success, that helped build healthier and long lasting relationships, that improved the quality of your social life, and that had a measurable effect on your health and wellness–and it was FREE–would you do it? Introducing the solution everybody’s capable of, a positive attitude.

Having a positive attitude isn’t about being overly optimistic or super-happy all the time, it’s more about perspective.  It’s looking at the things, people, feelings, and environment in your life and changing the way you think about those things.  It means changing your focus from “I wish” to “I can”.  It’s addressing negativity, defeatism, and hopelessness with a perspective that redirects your thoughts toward solutions and positive change.

There’s a pretty good body of evidence that positive mental attitude works.  From early work by psychologist Carl Rogers to motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, to sports figures like Steve Prefontaine and Tom Dempsey, the results of positive mental attitude can manifest itself is many different ways.

Your attitude effects learning and work, too. The more competent you feel, the more you can stick with a difficult task, or the more likely you are to find a new way to look at things or try something new.  A positive attitude about who you are translates to a positive self-esteem. A “can-do” attitude about work or school can translate into better performance all around.

From a health perspective, many studies suggest people with a more positive attitude have a significantly higher chance of survival and recovery from serious illness.  If you’ve ever known anyone with cancer or someone who’s suffered some trauma that has overturned their lives, you may have seen the power of attitude in setting the tone for how others interact, and improvements in the quality of their lives and the lives of people around them.

So where do you begin?  Choose one aspect of your life–a relationship, your physical health, your work, your school, your hobby–and stop thinking negatively.  Make it a point that when you think about the activity, you force yourself to see the GOOD along with the bad in each situation.  You don’t ignore the bad, you think of good ways to cope with those things.

Some people help themselves focus on those changes through yoga, meditation, affirmations, or just thoughtfulness.  Some turn to increased physical activity, like running or join a gym.  Or a focused hobby, like puzzle solving. Or working on a specific relationship.  All these activities are set up for real, measurable improvement, which helps you see progress as your positive attitude toward the people and things around you make things better.  Make YOU better.

Lots of people interested in starting their journey toward a more positive attitude also seek the relaxation and grounding of massage. Massage sessions can provide valuable “disconnect” time where you can center you thoughts while doing something wonderful for you body, mind and spirits. We have quite a few clients who come to us twice a month for therapeutic massage (massage that targets a specific “ouch” or tension) and reap the additional benefits of relaxation and stress reduction that comes with these sessions.  All this helps them feel better about their world–and helps cultivate a more positive mental attitude. We know you’re capable of making your attitude more positive.  Try it, you’ll like it.

source: http://svmassagetherapy.com

Keep moving for your health and well-being

Keep moving for your health and well-being!

In addition to being essential to general health and well-being, exercise is helpful in managing many MS symptoms. A study published by researchers at the University of Utah in 1996 was the first to demonstrate the benefits of exercise for people with MS. Those patients who participated in an aerobic exercise program benefited from:

  • better cardiovascular fitness
  • improved strength
  • better bladder and bowel function
  • less fatigue and depression
  • a more positive attitude
  • increased participation in social activities

Stretch Away Stiffness from MS

Try doing the following moves in the morning when muscles are at their tightest or before or after exercise. Doing these once or twice a day is optimal and will help increase your mobility.

Calf Stretch: Stand and place your hands flat against a wall at shoulder level. Place your right foot (toes forward) against the wall; move your left foot back so the toes of that foot are about 12 inches behind your right heel. Keep your back aligned and your left leg straight; bend your right knee and gently lean toward wall until you feel a stretch in the left calf. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds; switch sides and repeat. 

Front of Chest Stretch: Face a corner of a room. Stand with your feet a few inches away from the two adjacent walls. Bend your elbows at a 90-degree angle; place one forearm against each wall. Keep your shoulders relaxed and lean forward slightly until you feel a mild stretch in your chest. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds; relax.

Hamstring Stretch: Stand and cross your right foot in front of your left. Bend at the waist and slowly lower your forehead toward your right knee while keeping both knees straight. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds; switch sides and perform the stretch again.

Hip Flexor Stretch: Start by lying on your belly, with your body flat on the floor. Then, prop your torso up on your forearms and elbows. Keep your head in line with your neck. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

Easy Balance Exercises for MS

[Read more…]

MS Support Groups Tarzana -Simi Valley-Santa Clarita

MS SUPPORT GROUPS

Here are 3 MS Support groups  you might not know about!

Cornerstone Church 

2080 Winifred St.  Simi Valley, CA 93063

11:00 AM – 1:00 PM    ongoing

First Monday of the Month

Please call before attending a meeting to confirm time and location.

Contact information

Dennis Zurcher     dczurcher@sbcglobal.net
805-584-2526

—————————————————————–

Tarzana Community & Cultural Center
19130 Ventura Blvd.
Tarzana, CA 91356

Ongoing

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Second Saturday of the Month

Please call before attending a meeting to confirm time and location.

Contact information

Maria De Orellana
cyt1709@aol.com
818-370-8073


Saint Kateri Catholic Church  

22508 Copper Hill Dr.
Santa Clarita, CA 91350

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

ongoing

Second Thursday of the Month

Please call before attending a meeting to confirm time and location.

Contact information

Eire Garcia, Group Leader
emlina6@cs.com
661-297-6887

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease,  MS and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Therapeutic Humor promotes wellness

What is therapeutic humor?

Therapeutic humor is any intervention that promotes health and wellness by stimulating a playful discovery, expression or appreciation of the absurdity or incongruity of life’s situations.

This intervention may enhance work performance, support learning, improve health, or be used as a complementary treatment of illness to facilitate healing or coping, whether physical, emotional, cognitive, social or spiritual.

Laughter is the power of positive healing,” she said. “I’ve seen it work best for people with losses – death, divorce, a job, for example. Humor is a tool to empower people to move forward. It helps them improve their quality of life, to take better care of themselves.”

“A belly laugh increases the ability of your immune system to fight infections,” said Elizabeth Taylor, on the faculty of Bastyr University, the Seattle-area institution devoted to natural medicine.

Tip to Relieve Stress and Be Happier   by Roberta Gold, Laughter for the Health  of it. Los Angeles based Recreation Therapist and Humor Therapist

Don’t look at the news headlines first thing in the morning.  Don’t watch the news right before going to bed.  Instead think of something you really enjoyed doing during the day.  Make that your last thought before you go to bed.

There are so many benefits you can receive from laughing more. Relieve your stress, improve immunity and even tone up your abs.

Roberta belongs to an organization called AATH.org  – The Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor.  Visit their website to find research, books and articles about humor and humor therapy.

If more people listened to the comedy channel on the radio when they’re in their cars, there would be much less road rage.You can lower your cortisol levels (the hormone that may be making you fat) by simply laughing, even if you start with a fake laugh.  Your body doesn’t differentiate between a real laugh and a fake one.  When you’re feeling you’re lowest, force yourself to laugh.

When you get hit with intense “stuff” turn to gratitude. It will make it easier for you to laugh and feel better.  Write down what you’re grateful for in a notebook. (Writing in long hand will give you the best results)

Write a “to do” list and cross off something you’ve accomplished each day. When you cross off an accomplishment, or write a gratitude list, it will make you feel happier.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease, Stroke, TBI and MS – other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breathing efficiently during our summer heat

The cooling way to breath during summer!

Colleen Carroll, CYT

Colleen Carroll, CYT

Colleen Carroll, CYT, is a yoga therapist specializing in Neurological disorders. With the heat upon us, Colleen is sharing this video tutorial of the cooling breath, a wonderful yoga breathing technique perfect for hot weather and for any condition or situation that causes excess heat in the system. [Read more…]

Music Therapy Wellness clinic at CSUN

Music Therapy Clinic Information

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic at CSUN

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic provides individually designed music activities for children and adults with disabilities * PD, MS, STROKE and TBI)  and special challenges, including autism, developmental delay, physical, mental and emotional disorders, and learning disabilities.

Music therapy is a field that uses music in a prescribed manner as a treatment for rehabilitating, maintaining, and improving the lives of persons with physical, intellectual and emotional disabilities. Music Therapy is a creative arts therapy similar to others such as Art, Dance, and Drama Therapy. It is, however, unique in that music provides an accessible and enjoyable medium for growth and learning. It is a healing art, based on scientific principles and grounded in research.

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic is dedicated to creating an environment where an individual with special challenges can acquire necessary life skills through the unique, creative and enjoyable medium of music. Our therapists are internationally recognized and encompass a range of techniques and areas of expertise. Our entire treatment team is dedicated to creating the opportunity for each participant to express his or her true creative essence while gaining needed skills and enhancing self-esteem.

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic is a teaching clinic for the CSUN Music Therapy Department. As such, all sessions are utilized for student observation and learning and are part of the educational process for future music therapists.

Some of the benefits of Music Therapy include:

  • Development of fine and gross motor skills
  • Improvement in acquisition and application of academic fundamentals
  • Development of practical life skills
  • Increase in socialization
  • Enhancement of self-esteem
  • Expansion of the quality of life through musical enjoyment and creative self-expression

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic provides individual and group sessions conducted by a highly trained and experienced Music Therapist. A variety of instruments are used, including piano, guitar, percussion, auto-harp, recorder, electronic instruments, harmonica, and voice.

Contact Information

To contact the clinic please call 818-677-5663 or you can email us at csunmtwc@csun.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise and Activities in SFV to manage neurological symptoms

 

Exercise Routines And Activities To Manage Symptoms And Improve Quality Of Life

Live broadcast of Yoga for Parkinson’s with Renee Le Verrier, RYT

Pomona: Casa Colina Parkinson’s Disease Speech and Exercise Group

Azusa: Casa Colina Parkinson’s Disease Speech and Exercise Group

Pasadena: group and private fitness classes, cardio, Pilates, restorative yoga, Gyrotonic Expansion System®, and meditation with Leslie Frank, DPT (neurological program and multiple sclerosis program)

San Gabriel & San Fernando Valleys, Ventura County: fitness and targeted exercises for neurological disorders with Lori Michiel, NASM-CPT

Tarzana and Encino: aqua fitness with Deborah Goldberger (also private and semi-private instruction in your pool)

Encino: adult fitness classes including Tai Chi & Chi Qong at Balboa Sports Center, LA City Recreation and Parks

Northridge: therapeutic exercises on land and in the water at the Center of Achievement Through Adapted Physical Activity at California State University, Northridge (CSUN)

Northridge: Laughter Yoga with Shelley Bell, CLYL, CLYT

West Hills: art therapy with Alison Paolini

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County: Neurotherapeutic Yoga with Colleen Carroll, YT

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County: Nordic Walking with Carol H. Prata

Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley, Santa Barbara: therapeutic and intergenerational orchestra with MusicMendsMinds

Tarzana: Invertigo Dance Theatre is ready to bring its Dancing Through Parkinson’s

Westlake Village: weekly exercise class/Debbie Jew, coordinator
1st Friday of month – Exercise2nd Friday of month – Music Therapy with Debbie Sipos
3rd Friday of month – “Chair” yoga with Jamie Hampton4th Friday of month – Tai Chi with Nora Li

Ventura County: PD Fighters non-contact Rock Steady Boxing Method with Jennifer Parkinson

Ventura County: Laughter Wellness with Arlene Raisner, CLYL

Newbury Park: Anytime Fitness 24-hour gym great workout classes recommended by Judy C.

Camarillo: Mindfullness with Holly Sacks

Camarillo, Ventura: Art of Moving for PD and movement disorders with Camille Torgeson

Camarillo: Focus on Balance, Tai Chi for Rehabilitation, Tai Chi Sun, Aqua Exercise with Camille Torgeson

Ventura: Focus on Balance, Tai Chi for Rehabilitiation, Tai Chi Sun, Walking with Camille Torgeson

Santa Barbara: Move to Connect for PD with Leslie Sack and Ruth Wishengrad

 

Is it time to check your Vitamin D levels

Vitamin D and MS

If you have MS….

QUESTION: “Should I have my blood levels of vitamin D checked?”

ANSWER: Probably, agree most doctors.

Click on the colored link below; it will take you directly to the article

Read more about vitamins herbs and minerals in MS. (pdf)

Published by the National MS Society: http://www.nationalmssociety.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code

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Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

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Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

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