Could you be eligible for a grant from the MS Foundation

FROM MS Foundation/ MS FOCUS

Did you know that you or your loved one might be eligible for a grant/ financial assistance through the MS Foundation: Grants & Programs?

Go to: https://msfocus.org/Get-Help/MSF-Programs-Grant, OR call National Toll-Free Helpline at 888-MS Focus (888-673-6287), OR EMAIL: email support@msfocus.org. to complete and submit your application .

Grants and Programs include:

Emergency Assistance Program

Health and Wellness Grant

Healthcare Assistance Grant

Homecare Assistance Grant

Assistive Technology Program

Computer Program

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

Minimize your Stress Level this Holiday Season

 

 

Minimize Stress during the upcoming Holiday Season!

What  you and your caregivers can do to minimize this stress and have at least a chance at enjoying the holidays?

  1. Put first things first. If you’ve always felt depressed during the holidays, caregiving won’t make things easier. If you get depressed from the lack of sunlight in the winter months, see your doctor. There are therapies that can help this syndrome, which is known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). If you don’t have a problem with the sunlight, but still suffer seasonal depression, talking with a counselor to learn to cope with this depression is often a good idea.
  2. If you have always enjoyed the holidays, but now find them overwhelming because of too many demands on your time, you will need to learn to simplify the season. Yes, that will mean disappointing a few people, perhaps elders and children alike, but simplification is often the only choice you have, if you are to remain somewhat sane.
  3. Learn to detach from the negative feedback you may get from others because of changes you are making. Detaching simply means that you recognize the other person’s feelings, but you will not allow yourself to react or be controlled by their feelings without considering your own needs, as well. You set boundaries by telling others what you can and can’t do. You look at the situation with open eyes, perhaps get some feedback from people you think can help you, and then make your own decisions. Acknowledging your loved ones’ views, and telling them you love them, but simply can’t do it all, generally helps. If your mom says, “But we’ve always done it that way,” you say, “Yes, we have, but now our holiday has to change a little, since our lives have changed.” If your kids lay on the guilt because you can’t bake every kind of cookie they want, let them know that you want to please them, but that your time is limited now, so they can help you by being flexible. If you offer to let them help you, they may feel part of the decision, rather than brushed off. The main idea is that you don’t react to their negativity. Generally, when you stop reacting, other people will calm down.
  4. Use music as a soothing tool for all. If you have elders in nursing homes, bring them a CD player and CDs so they can play old songs they enjoy. Around the house, play Christmas tunes your kids like, but don’t forget your own needs. If you have some favorite holiday tunes on CDs, play those too. However, if you get a sick feeling every time you enter a mall because the Holiday music reminds you of all you have to do, then play other types of music at home. Do consider music of some kind. Classical music can be very therapeutic, religious music helps many, and old rock and roll or country songs may give you a boost.
  5. Soothing light can help most people relax. Obviously, candles aren’t allowed in nursing homes and likely aren’t a good idea for elders or kids. But there are many softly lit holiday decorations you can safely use, or get some indirect lamps for atmosphere. Soft lights, combined with good music, can help calm nearly anyone, including a caregiver. Try it while you bake treats, decorate your home or the elders’ homes, or do other holiday duties.
  6. Meditation can be as simple as getting up early or going to bed late. The idea is to have some quiet time for yourself. Some people like guided meditation, where music or soothing words on CD or DVD help them relax in a progressive manner. Other people prefer going outside, maybe to a park or sitting near water, if possible, to enjoy natural calm. Some folks concentrate on their breathing pattern while they repeat one soothing word. This helps them calm their overactive brain. There’s no right or wrong way to meditate, but numerous studies have shown mediation can have a healthy effect on mood, as well as physical wellbeing. Also, try to eat right and exercise. This is extra hard during the holiday season, but you can feel better if you treat your body right.
  7. Ask your spouse, a friend or relative to take over some of your duties for a time. It’s amazing how many of us think we have to do everything ourselves, even though others would help if we only asked them. When we don’t ask for help, people often don’t know we need help, or else they simply don’t know what to do.
  8. Take a trip down memory lane. Remember your parents when they were young and healthy. Remember your children when they were tiny. Remember the good times before these difficult times. When you do that, you’ll likely find a better balance in your life, because you’ll start to recognize that life is cyclical, and better times will come again.
  9. Allow yourself to feel the pain of your aging parents’ losses. As my elders aged and grew frail, I was deeply saddened by their physical and psychological pain. The holidays threw a spotlight on all the things they could no longer enjoy. This pain is real. Allow yourself to feel it. Write it down. Talk about it with other caregivers, a religious leader, or a good friend. Get it out. It’s natural, human and okay to feel the loss. If you feel bitter or angry, say so. Get it all out and don’t allow shame to enter into the equation. You have a right to all of your feelings.
  10. Let go of perfection. It’s likely that all of those holidays you remember as being so wonderful really weren’t that perfect. Every human being looks at events differently. Time skews our memories. Life wasn’t perfect thirty years ago, twenty years ago or ten years ago. It’s far from perfect now. Do your best with what you have. Take care of yourself along with the others, and your holidays will be as good as they can be. Let that be good enough.

-adapted from article written by Carol Bradley Bursack, Editor in chief, Elderlink

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address:   

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

  West Hills, CA 91307

 

MS Trial Alerts for California

MS Trial Alert: Investigators in California, Recruiting for Study of Online Program to Treat Depression in All Forms of MS

SUMMARY: Investigators at three sites in the United States and two sites in Germany are recruiting 400 people with all forms of MS for a study testing the effectiveness of a computer training program for overcoming MS-related depression. The lead investigator is Stefan Gold, PhD, at Charité University in Berlin, Germany. The study is funded by the National MS Society. Please note: Two visits to a study site are required.

DETAILS
Rationale: Depression is a common symptom experienced by people living with multiple sclerosis. At the same time, MS symptoms such as walking difficulties, cognitive problems, and fatigue can make it difficult to attend sessions with a psychotherapist. Dr. Gold’s team recently conducted a small trial using a fully-automated, computer-based program to reduce depression in people with MS. The program can be accessed over the internet and completed from an individual’s home, eliminating the need to travel. The team’s preliminary results suggested that this program, called “Deprexis,” may reduce MS depression.

Dr. Gold and colleagues are now conducting a large-scale, phase III trial at five MS centers in Germany and the U.S. to test the effectiveness of the Deprexis computer training program in 400 people with MS.

Eligibility and Details: Participants should be over the age of 18, with a diagnosis of MS and symptoms of depression. They should be able to travel to a study site for two clinical assessments, and must have internet access at home. Further details are available by contacting the site nearest you.

Participants are being randomly assigned to one of three groups: One group will receive access to the web-based Deprexis program for three months; another group will receive the web-based Deprexis program plus scheduled e-mail contacts once each week for three months; and a third control group will be on a waiting list, and will receive Deprexis only after waiting six months.

The primary outcome being assessed is a clinical scale that measures depression. Other outcomes include measures of quality of life, cognitive function, and fatigue. Participants are being evaluated at the beginning of the study, and after three months, six months and 12 months. The first two evaluations require a visit to the study site at which they are enrolled, whereas the last two are completed online.

Contact: To learn more about the enrollment criteria for this study, and to find out if you are eligible to participate, please contact the U.S. site nearest you:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Los Angeles, California
Phone: (310) 423-4008
Email: Daniel.Perez2@cshs.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                              

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                               

West Hills, CA 91307

Reminders for everyone as we enter the Autumn Season

 

Take time to readjust your body, as we enter Autumn!

Below are some good reminders!

Falling leaves and early sunsets mean autumn is coming. These seasonal changes, like slowness of movement, stiffness and rigidity throughout the body, can increase the risk of falling.

We know that Falls are a risk for everyone! . Below are some things you can do to prevent falls this autumn AND general tips for the tranisiton between

Summer to Autumn.

🍁 Readjust to the time change faster. Each morning, open all shades and make the home as bright as possible. During the day, go for a walk or read outside (bring your sunscreen). At night, try to go to sleep at the same time each day.
🍁 Talk to your health care team. They will help you assess your biggest fall risk factors — like medications, balance issues, stress or environmental hazards.
🍁 See a physical therapist BEFORE a fall occurs. He or she can teach you how to safely get back up and can show caregivers the best way to assist their loved one while avoiding injuries.
🍁 Consider making changes around the house: in the bathroom, use non-skid surfaces and grab bars. In the living room, move coffee tables and clear all walking paths.

The transition from summer to fall can be a challenge. To help ease the change, we have put together 15 Autumn Wellness Tips to get you ready for the colder months and keep your mental (and physical!) health in check.

-Start taking a Vitamin D supplement. We get most of our Vitamin D from the sun, so our intake decreases when the weather is colder since we spend most of our time inside during the fall/winter seasons. If you find you are not getting outside much, a Vitamin D supplement can boost your mood and immune system!

-Take some time to yourself. Autumn and winter are the Earth’s way of telling us to slow down. Start a journal or track your moods to get more in touch with how your feeling.

-Get your flu shot and yearly check-up. Self explanatory! No one likes sniffling and aching and sneezing and coughing getting in the way of life. Yuck.

Boost your immune system. You can do this by drinking plenty of water, washing your hands often to prevent sickness, and eating nutritious foods.

-Get yourself ready for Daylight Savings Time. Go to bed earlier when you can, especially the week before the clocks change. Longer periods of darkness = longer periods of sleep!

(Don’t forget to change any manual clocks (like an alarm clock!)

-Make some plans for the cold months. In the winter, we tend to hibernate if we don’t have things to keep us busy.

-Moisturize your skin. Harsh temperatures can make your skin dry. Also, you still should be wearing sunscreen.

-Buy in-season food. Beets, broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, kale, pumpkin, broths, roasted squash, roots and sautéed dark leafy greens are all great choices.

-Stay active! It can be easy to just sit around all the time, but it’s important to get in some movement throughout the day. Raking leaves or shoveling snow counts!

-Wear layers and protect your body from the dropping temperature. Make sure you have gloves, a scarf, ear muffs, a winter coat, warm socks, and snow boots!

-Do some “spring cleaning” in the fall. Clean out your closet, organize that back room, and rid yourself of things you don’t need.

-Prepare your home for possible extreme weather conditions. Do you have a shovel and/or snow blower? Do your flashlights have batteries? Is your heat working okay?

-Get some books to read and shows to watch. Who doesn’t want to sit by the fire on chilly winter nights and read a good book or binge-watch some Netflix?

-Keep a schedule. The cold months can seem to drag on and push us into isolation. Stay on track by scheduling time in your day to do things you like to do.

-Be kind to yourself. The holidays can cause weight gain, the shorter days can cause low mood, and the flu season can cause sickness. Listen to your body and give it what it needs, and don’t beat yourself up! Try reframing negative thoughts into positive ones.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                                  

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                             

West Hills, CA 91307

 

Getting Rid of Tension Headaches

GETTING RID OF TENSION HEADACHES

MOTHER’s invention: To relieve headache pain, dab a drop or two of thyme or rosemary essential oil on each temple and on your forehead. Rub gently into the skin, then sit quietly for several minutes to let this home remedy work. A few simple exercises to stretch your head and neck can help reduce the intensity of the headache.

What else you can do

Medical treatment for headache disorders can often be assisted by the patient in their daily actions. For prevention of headaches it’s important to evaluate your lifestyle and identify areas for improvement. Regular exercise and regular, consistent rest are vital components of preserving a healthy lifestyle. Maintaining a healthy diet, including drinking lots of fluids, might also help prevent symptoms. Identify triggers for your headaches and avoid interaction with these as much as possible. Some possible triggers are include:

  • Certain foods such as aged cheeses, sausages, chocolate, fermented food, MSG
  • Use of alcohol
  • Chemicals such as nicotine, gasoline, glue, household cleaners, perfumes, paint
  • Certain emotions such as stress
  • Disruption in your regular schedule such as skipping a meal or disruption in your sleep pattern
  • Hormones – Many women, esp. migraine sufferers, notice symptoms tend to occur at a certain point in their menstrual cycle
  • Change in environment such as when traveling or a move to a new home
  • Change in weather

When interaction with certain triggers is inevitable, try to develop ways to combat these interactions. Take extra care with your health. Drink plenty of fluids, get extra rest. Minimize interaction as much as possible. When a headache is occurring, preventative measures will not help the emergent need to reduce your pain; but there are some things you can do in an acute situation to help decrease your symptoms. If you take medication at the onset of a headache, try to take the medication at the first sign of symptoms – the earlier the better! During a headache, use a cold compress, lie down in a dark quiet room, and drink fluids (suck on ice if nausea makes it difficult to drink). Try using relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, visualization of a peaceful and  serene scene, progressive relaxation, or massage the muscles of your head and neck.

From: http://neurologicalwellness.com

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

 

How to try and be an Optimistic caregiver

8 WAYS to be a more optimistic caregiver:

From: http://www.caregiverstress.com

Some  ideas about how to feel more optimistic and resilient as  a caregiver:

  1. Look for the Good

Author Catherine Pulsifer said, “To find optimism, look for the good things in life.” This advice may be easier said than done, however it’s important to help keep the negative thoughts at bay. Try making a list each day of things that are good in your life. Some caregivers shared that they were grateful for the little things like a cool breeze, a nap, or sunshine. When problems loom large, look for the small bright spots in your life.

  1. Speak kindly – to yourself

“Don’t say anything to yourself that you wouldn’t say to anyone else,” recommends a mayoclinic.org article on positive thinking. Turning off the negative dialogue in your head can be a powerful tool to harness optimism. The first step is recognizing negative thoughts and reframing them in your mind. For example, instead of thinking, “This will never work,” you might say to yourself, “I’ll try again a different way.” Positive thinking takes practice, and with time you’ll notice fewer critical or negative thoughts popping into your mind.

  1. Lean on positive people

Surrounding yourself with positive friends and family is helpful when trying to stay upbeat yourself. Phyllis, a family caregiver, said that she is grateful for “the helpful people I have met on my journey. Their kindness is inspirational.” Seeing the positivity in others and involving them in your life can be powerful. “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with,” said the late Jim Rohn, entrepreneur, author and motivational speaker. Choose to spend time with those that give you energy and positivity, not people that take it from you. If getting together in person is not possible, connect online or join a supportive online community such as the Caregiver Stress Relief community

  1. Find happiness through health

A healthy diet and exercise can go a long way to improve mood and maintain positivity in your life. Exercise can reduce stress, increase energy, and foster good sleep habits. Can’t find 30 minutes a day to exercise? Break it up into three 10-minute chunks. With today’s technology, you can find activities to get you moving online or even “On Demand” workouts

through your cable TV provider. Eating well can also impact wellbeing. Maintaining a healthy diet is a priority for Cindy, a family caregiver. “It’s probably one of the most important things to do to keep my mind sharp,” she said.

  1. Remember you are doing your best

Alzheimer’s expert Karen Garner tells caregivers on her blog to remember “…you know you did the best you could at that particular moment.” Karen was a caregiver to her husband before he passed, and said “I was entrenched in the battle of caregiving that leaves little room for luxuries like taking the time to write and read and sit quietly to reflect on all that is happening.” She reminds caregivers that they showed up when it mattered the most and were present. “At times, you may have lost your patience, but that doesn’t detract from all the other positives you have done,” she said.

  1. Laugh to lighten your load

Not only does laughter make you feel good, its positive effects stay with you long after the chuckling subsides. Research shows that laughter lowers stress hormones, relaxes muscles, improves mood, and eases anxiety. According to HelpGuide.org, “Humor helps you keep a positive, optimistic outlook through difficult situations, disappointments, and loss.” Some caregivers not only find laugher for themselves, they share it with others. Linda says that she is always grateful for “another day filled with laughter with my loved one.”

  1. Keep it simple

Sometimes, doing only what needs to be done – dishes, laundry, meals – can make the days less daunting. Don’t set unrealistic goals for yourself. Family caregiver Angela describes how she lets it go “if in fact my sofa wins the day” and she doesn’t meet her own expectations. To keep it simple, she tries to pick one thing to accomplish and focuses on that

  1. Take time for yourself

Whether it’s a quick walk around the block or meeting a friend for lunch, taking a break from caregiving duties is important for your health and wellbeing. If you’re able to take time off, it will be good for both you and your loved one. Gail is a caregiver to her father and said she is grateful for “…the care companions who do so much more than just give me some respite time. They engage Dad in a way that helps him be alert and happy.” Look to a family member, friend, or professional caregiver to give you a few hours to yourself so you can recharge and maintain an optimistic outlook.

Caregiving can be rewarding, but no caregiver breezes through the journey without feeling some degree of negativity and hopelessness creeping in. By following tips to stay positive, you may be able to transition your outlook to one of optimism and gratitude for even the smallest positive things in life.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                                  

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                              

West Hills, CA 91307

Study shows Horseback riding improves balance

Study Shows Therapeutic Horseback Riding (Hippotherapy) Improves Balance and More in People with MS

Source: http://www.nationalmssociety.org

SUMMARY

DETAILS
Background: Hippotherapy literally means “treatment with the help of the horse” from the Greek word “hippos,” meaning horse. This type of treatment uses a horse’s movements to achieve therapeutic goals. Physical therapists use hippotherapy to work on an individual’s balance and postural control; occupational therapists use it to work on fine motor control, attention and sensory integration; and speech-language therapists use the sessions to stimulate communication and cognitive skills.

The Study: In this study, 70 participants with MS and lower limb spasticity from five centers in Germany were randomly assigned to receive standard care plus one ½-hour session of hippotherapy per week, or just standard care, for 12 weeks. The primary outcome being measured was the effect on balance, and secondary outcomes included measures of fatigue, quality of life, pain and spasticity.

The results show that compared to the control group just receiving standard care, those who received hippotherapy plus standard care improved significantly in measures of balance, fatigue, spasticity and quality of life. Both groups experienced reductions in pain.
In terms of safety, one person in the hippotherapy group fell off the therapy horse but was able to continue the study. Two participants in the hippotherapy group experienced an MS relapse accompanied by painful muscle contractions.

The team (Vanessa Vermöhlen, University of Cologne, Germany, and colleagues) report their findings in the Multiple Sclerosis Journal (Published online August 3, 2017, available via Open Access).

Read more: Whether you enroll in an official therapeutic program or are just looking for venues in your community for access to horseback riding, the American Hippotherapy Association and the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship can provide information and resources.
COPY AND PASTE   www: momentummagazineonline.com  into your search engine       to read about “HORSE POWER”

MS newly diagnosed at age 70

Diagnosed at 70; that’s good news!

By Connie from Arkansas

I always knew that if I lived long enough, I would become famous for something! I am the oldest living newly diagnosed person at two different MS clinics. I was diagnosed three years ago at age 70 in Denver, Colorado.

When my first symptoms appeared – slurring words, stumbling gait, and moving in slow motion – a mild stroke was the first suspicion. With this in mind, my family practitioner sent me to the hospital.

After two days of tests, the neurology team came into my room to bring me the grim news. I did not have a stroke. It was multiple sclerosis. I startled them by breathing a sigh of relief and then starting to laugh. I tried to explain that they had just told me that I did not have a stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, cancer, or congestive heart failure. I could handle multiple sclerosis!

Suddenly, a lot of physical occurrences over the last thirty to forty years started to make sense. I had experienced the blurred vision, stumbling, periods of extreme fatigue, and one bad episode in 1985 when my right side became numb.

I was fortunate in that I chose dietetics for my major in college, teaching me how to eat healthy foods and to exercise. After a skiing accident, which led to six surgeries and a lot of nuts and bolts in both legs, I started swimming laps and attending water aerobics classes. I truly believe that water aerobics is one of the reasons I am still in relatively good shape at the age of 73. It is a wonderful program for keeping your muscles flexible and keeping you moving without additional stress.

Interestingly, my arms became numb about two months after I stopped taking estrogen tablets. I had read that a woman with MS feels very good when she is pregnant, at which time her estrogen levels are raised. I consulted a doctor friend, and despite information about potential heart problems, I went back on a low dose of estrogen. Within two months, my arms were no longer numb.

As for the memory loss, at my age it is difficult to determine if the memory loss is due to the MS or just old age. Most of my friends have similar problems. I simply buy more yellow stickies! (Also known as “Post-it®,” notes, used to leave little reminders around the house.)

Of course, I do need to prepare for whatever is ahead of me. I purchased a one-level house with no steps anywhere. I have taken doors off, put in sliding doors, hanging pot racks, slide-out shelves, and have generally made the home wheelchair accessible. My theory is, “If I am ready, it won’t happen; if I’m not, it will.”

I relate to Teri Garr, her symptoms, and her outlook; her story has convinced me that I am on the right track. I keep my eye out for new adventures, I keep laughing, I cheer up my friends when they get a sympathetic look, and above all, I surround myself with upbeat people.

I truly feel that in spite of the MS, I am a survivor, and one of the lucky ones! My husband says, “You are easy to live with 98 percent of the time!” I have a doctor who tells me, “You are in really good shape for the shape you are in!” And I have three sons who simply call me, “One tough old broad.” It doesn’t get much better than that.

Editor’s note: Connie’s decision to stay on estrogen is based on her own, personal experience; MSAA does not promote any specific drug or treatment; readers are cautioned not to make any changes to their treatment regimens without consulting their physician.

The power of a positive attitude

The Power of a Positive Attitude

What if you could change one thing about yourself that was proven, time and time again, to have a significant positive impact on your business success, that helped build healthier and long lasting relationships, that improved the quality of your social life, and that had a measurable effect on your health and wellness–and it was FREE–would you do it? Introducing the solution everybody’s capable of, a positive attitude.

Having a positive attitude isn’t about being overly optimistic or super-happy all the time, it’s more about perspective.  It’s looking at the things, people, feelings, and environment in your life and changing the way you think about those things.  It means changing your focus from “I wish” to “I can”.  It’s addressing negativity, defeatism, and hopelessness with a perspective that redirects your thoughts toward solutions and positive change.

There’s a pretty good body of evidence that positive mental attitude works.  From early work by psychologist Carl Rogers to motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, to sports figures like Steve Prefontaine and Tom Dempsey, the results of positive mental attitude can manifest itself is many different ways.

Your attitude effects learning and work, too. The more competent you feel, the more you can stick with a difficult task, or the more likely you are to find a new way to look at things or try something new.  A positive attitude about who you are translates to a positive self-esteem. A “can-do” attitude about work or school can translate into better performance all around.

From a health perspective, many studies suggest people with a more positive attitude have a significantly higher chance of survival and recovery from serious illness.  If you’ve ever known anyone with cancer or someone who’s suffered some trauma that has overturned their lives, you may have seen the power of attitude in setting the tone for how others interact, and improvements in the quality of their lives and the lives of people around them.

So where do you begin?  Choose one aspect of your life–a relationship, your physical health, your work, your school, your hobby–and stop thinking negatively.  Make it a point that when you think about the activity, you force yourself to see the GOOD along with the bad in each situation.  You don’t ignore the bad, you think of good ways to cope with those things.

Some people help themselves focus on those changes through yoga, meditation, affirmations, or just thoughtfulness.  Some turn to increased physical activity, like running or join a gym.  Or a focused hobby, like puzzle solving. Or working on a specific relationship.  All these activities are set up for real, measurable improvement, which helps you see progress as your positive attitude toward the people and things around you make things better.  Make YOU better.

Lots of people interested in starting their journey toward a more positive attitude also seek the relaxation and grounding of massage. Massage sessions can provide valuable “disconnect” time where you can center you thoughts while doing something wonderful for you body, mind and spirits. We have quite a few clients who come to us twice a month for therapeutic massage (massage that targets a specific “ouch” or tension) and reap the additional benefits of relaxation and stress reduction that comes with these sessions.  All this helps them feel better about their world–and helps cultivate a more positive mental attitude. We know you’re capable of making your attitude more positive.  Try it, you’ll like it.

source: http://svmassagetherapy.com

Keep moving for your health and well-being

Keep moving for your health and well-being!

In addition to being essential to general health and well-being, exercise is helpful in managing many MS symptoms. A study published by researchers at the University of Utah in 1996 was the first to demonstrate the benefits of exercise for people with MS. Those patients who participated in an aerobic exercise program benefited from:

  • better cardiovascular fitness
  • improved strength
  • better bladder and bowel function
  • less fatigue and depression
  • a more positive attitude
  • increased participation in social activities

Stretch Away Stiffness from MS

Try doing the following moves in the morning when muscles are at their tightest or before or after exercise. Doing these once or twice a day is optimal and will help increase your mobility.

Calf Stretch: Stand and place your hands flat against a wall at shoulder level. Place your right foot (toes forward) against the wall; move your left foot back so the toes of that foot are about 12 inches behind your right heel. Keep your back aligned and your left leg straight; bend your right knee and gently lean toward wall until you feel a stretch in the left calf. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds; switch sides and repeat. 

Front of Chest Stretch: Face a corner of a room. Stand with your feet a few inches away from the two adjacent walls. Bend your elbows at a 90-degree angle; place one forearm against each wall. Keep your shoulders relaxed and lean forward slightly until you feel a mild stretch in your chest. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds; relax.

Hamstring Stretch: Stand and cross your right foot in front of your left. Bend at the waist and slowly lower your forehead toward your right knee while keeping both knees straight. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds; switch sides and perform the stretch again.

Hip Flexor Stretch: Start by lying on your belly, with your body flat on the floor. Then, prop your torso up on your forearms and elbows. Keep your head in line with your neck. Hold for 20 to 30 seconds.

Easy Balance Exercises for MS

[Read more…]

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Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

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Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
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1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
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