Lecture on new Advances in DBS Pasadena January 2018

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Presentation on New Advances in DBS treatments

January 9, 2018

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy has been proven over the past 20 years* to be an effective treatment option for symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. The latest advancements to DBS offer innovations in the way the therapy is delivered and how it is controlled. Attend this free informational seminar to learn more about DBS therapy, including the benefits and risks of this therapy. Call 323-326-4158 or email jsykes@sjm.com to reserve your spot.

Igor Fineman, MD, FACS
Jennifer Birch, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC
Raymond Neurosurgery & Spine
Yvette Yeung, MD | DaVita Healthcare Partners
Tyler Cheung, MD | Huntington Hospital

January 9, 2018 | 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
South Pasadena Public Library Community Room
1115 El Centro Ave
Pasadena, CA 91030

You can be the unexpected artist with PD

CAN YOU IMAGINE…..

 Chip Colley was an outdoorsman, not an artist. “I had friends who were artists, but I couldn’t paint at all,” he says.

Colley grew up fishing with his father on the Escambia Bay near his hometown of Pensacola, Florida. When his son, Zachary, was old enough, Colley introduced him to the timeless father-son tradition of pre-dawn angling.

And, when he was first diagnosed with PD, Colley fled to the cypress bog behind his house to reflect on this new, largely unwelcome phase of his life.

Early on in the disease, he was hit hard by bouts of insomnia that would last until three o’clock in the morning. Not a huge fan of television (“It stresses me out.”), he struggled to occupy these sleepless nights.

During the day, Colley frequented the three art galleries in town. He enjoyed perusing the creations of the professional artists until one day, one of those artists came up to him and asked, “Why don’t you try to paint something?”

He initially dismissed the idea outright. “My hands were always shaking so hard that I couldn’t even write my own name,” he says.

However, during one of the endless, empty nights, Colley made a decision that would forever alter his outlook on his disease. He grabbed a sheet of paper and some pencils and began to draw.

To his surprise, the drawings turned out “pretty good.” Colley began to expand his scope, digging through boxes of his children’s old art supplies. “I started painting with anything I could get my hands on,” he says.

He had questions about his newfound penchant for portraiture, but continued to allow his creative juices to flow. The next time Colley went to his neurologist for a checkup, he presented the doctor with a stack of paintings and asked, “What’s this about?”

The physician was impressed, but not surprised by Colley’s prowess. He suggested Colley enroll in a study about PD and creativity being conducted by the University of Florida. “We walked in and they just handed us a bag of art supplies and told us to do our thing.”

Colley’s art has gradually gotten better. He prefers painting and sculpting, sometimes combining the two to create paintings with embossed surfaces. “It’s been great. I’ve met so many people since I started doing art,” he says. “When you’re focused on a project, you tend not to think about your physical problems. It just takes you away.”

His advice for fellow sufferers: “Pick up a paintbrush, dance, sing. Do anything you want, but do not just sit there. Enjoy your life. I’m considered an artist now. I would never have dreamed it in a million years.”

 

The importance of TIME in your life

SOME THOUGHTS DURING THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

 

Value your time

Once a moment is gone, you cannot get it back. Spend each one wisely, with intention, with purpose, with meaning.

Your time is more precious than just about anything else you have. For it is with time that you create, access and experience all else.

Don’t let yourself be tricked into providing it too cheaply. What appears to be a bargain in terms of money can end up imposing a terrible cost on your irreplaceable time.

Do you constantly feel you have too little time? That’s a strong indication you’re not placing a high enough value on the time you have.

Each day comes to you with plenty of time for rich, creative, meaningful living. Hold every moment to a high standard, and insist on spending them all engaged in what truly matters.

Time is your opportunity to fill life with great treasure. Make good and meaningful use of every single minute.
— Ralph Marston

 

 

Reminders for everyone as we enter the Autumn Season

 

Take time to readjust your body, as we enter Autumn!

Below are some good reminders!

Falling leaves and early sunsets mean autumn is coming. These seasonal changes, like slowness of movement, stiffness and rigidity throughout the body, can increase the risk of falling.

We know that Falls are a risk for everyone! . Below are some things you can do to prevent falls this autumn AND general tips for the tranisiton between

Summer to Autumn.

🍁 Readjust to the time change faster. Each morning, open all shades and make the home as bright as possible. During the day, go for a walk or read outside (bring your sunscreen). At night, try to go to sleep at the same time each day.
🍁 Talk to your health care team. They will help you assess your biggest fall risk factors — like medications, balance issues, stress or environmental hazards.
🍁 See a physical therapist BEFORE a fall occurs. He or she can teach you how to safely get back up and can show caregivers the best way to assist their loved one while avoiding injuries.
🍁 Consider making changes around the house: in the bathroom, use non-skid surfaces and grab bars. In the living room, move coffee tables and clear all walking paths.

The transition from summer to fall can be a challenge. To help ease the change, we have put together 15 Autumn Wellness Tips to get you ready for the colder months and keep your mental (and physical!) health in check.

-Start taking a Vitamin D supplement. We get most of our Vitamin D from the sun, so our intake decreases when the weather is colder since we spend most of our time inside during the fall/winter seasons. If you find you are not getting outside much, a Vitamin D supplement can boost your mood and immune system!

-Take some time to yourself. Autumn and winter are the Earth’s way of telling us to slow down. Start a journal or track your moods to get more in touch with how your feeling.

-Get your flu shot and yearly check-up. Self explanatory! No one likes sniffling and aching and sneezing and coughing getting in the way of life. Yuck.

Boost your immune system. You can do this by drinking plenty of water, washing your hands often to prevent sickness, and eating nutritious foods.

-Get yourself ready for Daylight Savings Time. Go to bed earlier when you can, especially the week before the clocks change. Longer periods of darkness = longer periods of sleep!

(Don’t forget to change any manual clocks (like an alarm clock!)

-Make some plans for the cold months. In the winter, we tend to hibernate if we don’t have things to keep us busy.

-Moisturize your skin. Harsh temperatures can make your skin dry. Also, you still should be wearing sunscreen.

-Buy in-season food. Beets, broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, kale, pumpkin, broths, roasted squash, roots and sautéed dark leafy greens are all great choices.

-Stay active! It can be easy to just sit around all the time, but it’s important to get in some movement throughout the day. Raking leaves or shoveling snow counts!

-Wear layers and protect your body from the dropping temperature. Make sure you have gloves, a scarf, ear muffs, a winter coat, warm socks, and snow boots!

-Do some “spring cleaning” in the fall. Clean out your closet, organize that back room, and rid yourself of things you don’t need.

-Prepare your home for possible extreme weather conditions. Do you have a shovel and/or snow blower? Do your flashlights have batteries? Is your heat working okay?

-Get some books to read and shows to watch. Who doesn’t want to sit by the fire on chilly winter nights and read a good book or binge-watch some Netflix?

-Keep a schedule. The cold months can seem to drag on and push us into isolation. Stay on track by scheduling time in your day to do things you like to do.

-Be kind to yourself. The holidays can cause weight gain, the shorter days can cause low mood, and the flu season can cause sickness. Listen to your body and give it what it needs, and don’t beat yourself up! Try reframing negative thoughts into positive ones.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation                                  

23705 Vanowen St. # 216                             

West Hills, CA 91307

 

Playing golf will help will your parkinson’s symptoms

Playing golf: A story of one man’s enlightening moment:

If you happen to lose track of Gary Smith, there’s a good chance you’ll find him at Top Golf. He hits there for an hour a day.

“No one really knows I have Parkinson’s due to all the golfing I’m doing,” said Smith, 61, who was diagnosed in 2008. Smith was fighting fatigue and felt gravity literally pulling his body downward.

“When I walked my daughters down the aisle, you see a real stiff man,” recalled Smith. “You see me shuffling and I didn’t know it.”

Smith was finding it more difficult to control his movements because of the changes happening in his brain. Doctors told him exercise would help.

“I did marathons, triathlons, yoga, chased my wife around the house, hip hop, biking, boxing. Nothing really changed until I started golfing,” said Smith.

“Golf involves a very precise balance between mobility and stability and a combination of fine motor skills and gross motor skills,” said Dr. Martha McGraw, movement disorders specialist at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital. “Using those in a complex manner would certainly benefit brain function.”

Dr. McGraw said exercise in general not only helps people with Parkinson’s Disease—but reduces your risk for it because it helps the brain to repair and rebuild damaged networks, improves your brain’s ability to adapt, and protects against further damage.

“Next thing I knew, within a month I was feeling back to normal,” said Smith. “I feel like I’m back to my old self. I feel younger than I did probably in my 50s!”

Even his neurologist agreed.

“He’s had a dramatic improvement over the past six months or so since he’s become active with his golf program,” said Dr. McGraw.

It’s important to note each body is different. Smith’s just happens to enjoy and respond to this particular “par”-scription. Without changing his medications or dosages, he’s struggling less and feeling better than he has in years.

“[Golf has] changed me and I believe with all my heart that if someone tried it for a month — three or four times a week — they would feel a difference,” said Smith.

To date, there are no specific scientific studies that indicate golf is good for people with Parkinson’s Disease. Neurologists we spoke with say as a form of exercise they do support it. The physical benefit plus social aspect of the game enhances a patient’s well-being.

When Gary Smith was first diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, his reaction was fairly typical.

“I was angry with God,” he says. “After I railed at him for a while, I felt like he was saying, “Are you done now? I’ve got plans for you. I’ve got your back.”

So Gary faithfully followed his neurologist’s instructions, doing everything she told him. He took all his meds, followed all the procedures, did all the exercises — that is, he did pretty much all of the exercises.

Aerobics. Stretching. Tai chi. Hip-hop dancing. Triathlons. Yoga. Boxing. He even ran a marathon! But none of it brought him relief from his Parkinson’s disease.

And then he played golf… and felt pretty good afterwards. Then he played again.And again. And again. Within weeks, his Parkinson’s symptoms started disappearing. Before long, he was almost symptom-free.

To Gary, it felt like a miracle. But would it last?

Read the rest of Gary’s story in the latest issue of the Parkinson’sVoice. www.3parkinson.org

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

The power of a positive attitude

The Power of a Positive Attitude

What if you could change one thing about yourself that was proven, time and time again, to have a significant positive impact on your business success, that helped build healthier and long lasting relationships, that improved the quality of your social life, and that had a measurable effect on your health and wellness–and it was FREE–would you do it? Introducing the solution everybody’s capable of, a positive attitude.

Having a positive attitude isn’t about being overly optimistic or super-happy all the time, it’s more about perspective.  It’s looking at the things, people, feelings, and environment in your life and changing the way you think about those things.  It means changing your focus from “I wish” to “I can”.  It’s addressing negativity, defeatism, and hopelessness with a perspective that redirects your thoughts toward solutions and positive change.

There’s a pretty good body of evidence that positive mental attitude works.  From early work by psychologist Carl Rogers to motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, to sports figures like Steve Prefontaine and Tom Dempsey, the results of positive mental attitude can manifest itself is many different ways.

Your attitude effects learning and work, too. The more competent you feel, the more you can stick with a difficult task, or the more likely you are to find a new way to look at things or try something new.  A positive attitude about who you are translates to a positive self-esteem. A “can-do” attitude about work or school can translate into better performance all around.

From a health perspective, many studies suggest people with a more positive attitude have a significantly higher chance of survival and recovery from serious illness.  If you’ve ever known anyone with cancer or someone who’s suffered some trauma that has overturned their lives, you may have seen the power of attitude in setting the tone for how others interact, and improvements in the quality of their lives and the lives of people around them.

So where do you begin?  Choose one aspect of your life–a relationship, your physical health, your work, your school, your hobby–and stop thinking negatively.  Make it a point that when you think about the activity, you force yourself to see the GOOD along with the bad in each situation.  You don’t ignore the bad, you think of good ways to cope with those things.

Some people help themselves focus on those changes through yoga, meditation, affirmations, or just thoughtfulness.  Some turn to increased physical activity, like running or join a gym.  Or a focused hobby, like puzzle solving. Or working on a specific relationship.  All these activities are set up for real, measurable improvement, which helps you see progress as your positive attitude toward the people and things around you make things better.  Make YOU better.

Lots of people interested in starting their journey toward a more positive attitude also seek the relaxation and grounding of massage. Massage sessions can provide valuable “disconnect” time where you can center you thoughts while doing something wonderful for you body, mind and spirits. We have quite a few clients who come to us twice a month for therapeutic massage (massage that targets a specific “ouch” or tension) and reap the additional benefits of relaxation and stress reduction that comes with these sessions.  All this helps them feel better about their world–and helps cultivate a more positive mental attitude. We know you’re capable of making your attitude more positive.  Try it, you’ll like it.

source: http://svmassagetherapy.com

What Parkinson’s taught me about life- Emma Lawton, age 29 when diagnosed.

What Parkinson’s taught me about life-

by Emma Lawton, age 29 when diagnosed.

Good Morning.  “It’s knowing that the body is just a shell for the good stuff that’s inside.” ~ Emma Lawton

This is a wonderful video by a young woman diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at the age of 29.  Emma touched on 10 things Parkinson’s has taught her about life, herself and other people to show how being diagnosed has been the making of her, leaving her grateful rather than hopeless. She showed us how to reassess our own lives, switch up the positivism, stop sweating the small stuff and learn things in the process. She also showed us how even in the darkest times there’s always something to giggle at.  The video is about 15 minutes long and well worth it

NOTE: We do not include links to external websites in order to avoid spreading any potential computer viruses.

TO SEE THE VIDEO: YOU WILL NEED TO COPY and PASTE the WEBSITE below into your Search bar/ Server see the 15 minute video described above.

COPY AND PASTE THE WEBSITE BELOW INTO YOUR SEARCH BAR IN YOUR BROWSER ( Goggle, Yahoo, etc)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs-vPqfsO0Q

Emma is Head of Creative at SPIXII (an insurance startup), an author and speaker, and was recently featured in the BBC2 documentary ‘The Big Life Fix’, looking at the power of design to transform people’s lives. Diagnosed with Parkinson’s at 29, Emma has written about her experience in her book, Dropping the P Bomb

Go to www.microsoftwatch.org to read about a  new watch that Microsoft built for Emma to control her Tremors.  or enter:  PD Watch by Microsoft into your search engine.

SOURCE:

www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/05/10/microsoft-shows-off-watch-quiets-parkinsons-tremors/101517718  ​

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                         23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                               West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Summer days are here. For many, that means a summer trip or enjoying the extra sunlight to try a new outdoor activity. Summer is also the time to get your vitamin D. Did you know that our bodies can store Vitamin D from the summer to last through the winter?

Fun in the Sun

Know your spots. Look for a skin growth, mole or beauty mark that changes in size, color or texture.
Look for “sun sensitivity” listed on medication warning labels, which can increase your chances of sunburns.
Every day before leaving your house use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more.

Prevent Overheating

When outside, stay hydrated. Drink water even if you are not thirsty.
Exercise Smart. Try to exercise outdoors in the early morning or late afternoon when it’s cooler.
Know the signs of heat stroke: flushed face, high body temperature, headache, nausea, rapid pulse, dizziness and confusion.

Traveling Tips

Bring your Aware in Care hospitalization kit,  ID bracelet and card everywhere. Order your free Aware in Care kit at www.awareincare.org.
Rest the day before your trip AND the first full day you arrive.

 

For additional  more travel advice, sun safety tips and how to avoid heat exhaustion go to www.3parkinson.org

Therapeutic Humor promotes wellness

What is therapeutic humor?

Therapeutic humor is any intervention that promotes health and wellness by stimulating a playful discovery, expression or appreciation of the absurdity or incongruity of life’s situations.

This intervention may enhance work performance, support learning, improve health, or be used as a complementary treatment of illness to facilitate healing or coping, whether physical, emotional, cognitive, social or spiritual.

Laughter is the power of positive healing,” she said. “I’ve seen it work best for people with losses – death, divorce, a job, for example. Humor is a tool to empower people to move forward. It helps them improve their quality of life, to take better care of themselves.”

“A belly laugh increases the ability of your immune system to fight infections,” said Elizabeth Taylor, on the faculty of Bastyr University, the Seattle-area institution devoted to natural medicine.

Tip to Relieve Stress and Be Happier   by Roberta Gold, Laughter for the Health  of it. Los Angeles based Recreation Therapist and Humor Therapist

Don’t look at the news headlines first thing in the morning.  Don’t watch the news right before going to bed.  Instead think of something you really enjoyed doing during the day.  Make that your last thought before you go to bed.

There are so many benefits you can receive from laughing more. Relieve your stress, improve immunity and even tone up your abs.

Roberta belongs to an organization called AATH.org  – The Association for Applied and Therapeutic Humor.  Visit their website to find research, books and articles about humor and humor therapy.

If more people listened to the comedy channel on the radio when they’re in their cars, there would be much less road rage.You can lower your cortisol levels (the hormone that may be making you fat) by simply laughing, even if you start with a fake laugh.  Your body doesn’t differentiate between a real laugh and a fake one.  When you’re feeling you’re lowest, force yourself to laugh.

When you get hit with intense “stuff” turn to gratitude. It will make it easier for you to laugh and feel better.  Write down what you’re grateful for in a notebook. (Writing in long hand will give you the best results)

Write a “to do” list and cross off something you’ve accomplished each day. When you cross off an accomplishment, or write a gratitude list, it will make you feel happier.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease, Stroke, TBI and MS – other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Breathing efficiently during our summer heat

The cooling way to breath during summer!

Colleen Carroll, CYT

Colleen Carroll, CYT

Colleen Carroll, CYT, is a yoga therapist specializing in Neurological disorders. With the heat upon us, Colleen is sharing this video tutorial of the cooling breath, a wonderful yoga breathing technique perfect for hot weather and for any condition or situation that causes excess heat in the system. [Read more…]

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Shop with AmazonSmile and Support The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

It’s simple:

1) Go to AmazonSmile from the web browser on your computer or mobile device.
2)Login with your amazon.com username and password or create one if you are a new user.
3) Search for The NeuroCommunity Foundation in the search box on the right side where it asks which charity you would like to support.
4) Select The NeuroCommunity Foundation from the search results or type in The NeuroCommunity Foundation should the select not include our organization.
Happy shopping and thank you for supporting The NeuroCommunity Foundation

Support us when you shop for back-to-school items.

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Northridge Foundation For Neurological Research & Education

Smile with Back to School shopping

Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

All you need to do is enroll online at www.ralphs.com OR by calling Ralphs at
800-443-4438 after September 1, 2016.

If you happened to enroll prior to Sept 1st, Ralphs requires you to register again.

For your convenience, step-by-step website registration instructions are found below or can be found at www.ralphs.com, click on Community, click on Community Contributions, click on ‘Enroll Now’. If you don’t have computer access, please call us at 1-800-443-4438 for assistance.

Use you Ralph’s Rewards Card to Contribute Here’s How:

If you do not have a Ralph’s online account
1. Go to www.ralphs.com/account/create
2. Follow the easy steps to create an online account
3. You will be instructed to go to your email inbox to confirm your account
4. After you confirm your online account by clicking on the link in your email, return to
www.ralphs.com and click on ‘Sign In’, enter your email address and password.
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Enroll
b. Type our NPO number 82287 or Neurocommunity.org
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process

IF YOU HAVE ALREADY REGISTERED YOUR REWARDS CARD ON-LINE
(This means that you have already entered your email address and assigned yourself a password)

1. Log in to www.ralphs.com
2. Click Sign In
3. Enter your email address and password
4. Click on ‘Your Name’ (In the top right hand corner)
5. View all your information and edit as necessary
6. Link your card to your organization by clicking on:
a. Community Rewards – Re-Enroll
b. Type your NPO number or Name of your Organization
c. Remember to click on the circle to the left of your organizations’ name
d. Click on Enroll to finish your enrollment process