Parkinson’s disease and Dystonia

Dystonia and Parkinson’s Disease

Have you ever experienced a painful cramped foot or curled, clenched toes as part of life with Parkinson’s? These symptoms can often be a tell-tale sign of dystonia — sustained and often painful muscle twisting, spasms and cramps. Dystonia can be an early symptom of PD, or it can develop later, as a side effect of levodopa.

People with Parkinson’s commonly experience dystonia as a cramp in the foot that causes the toes to curl and stay clenched. In fact, in some people, a foot dystonia induced by walking or running may be one of the very first signs of the illness.

More commonly people who are being treated for PD complain of painful dystonia of the foot on the more severely affected side. This painful cramp usually goes away after the first dose of PD medications. Less commonly in treated patients, dystonia can affect other body parts and come and go throughout the day.

Dystonia can affect other parts of the body too. It causes forceful twisting movements that, for example, can draw a person’s arm behind their back, or pull the head to the side or toward the chest. These movements are different from the flowing, writhing movements of dyskinesia, which are not painful.

Although people with PD sometimes have dystonia, it also is its own movement disorder — people can have dystonia without having PD. Whether dystonia is part of PD or not, it is caused by changes in an area of the brain called the basal ganglia, and is often treated with the same medications.

Common Symptoms

Pain. The twisting and cramping of muscles in dystonia are among the most painful symptoms experienced by people with PD.

Parts of the body affected by dystonia:

Arms, hands, legs and feet: involuntary movements and spasms.

Neck: may twist uncomfortably, causing the head to be pulled down, or to one side. This is called cervical dystonia or spasmodic torticollis.

Eyes: muscles around the eyes may squeeze involuntarily, leading a person to blink too much or to have difficulty opening the eyes.

Vocal cords and swallowing muscles: a person’s voice may sound strangled, hoarse or breathy.

Face and jaw: the jaw may open or close forcefully or there may be grimacing of the face.

[Read more…]

Getting Rid of Tension Headaches

GETTING RID OF TENSION HEADACHES

MOTHER’s invention: To relieve headache pain, dab a drop or two of thyme or rosemary essential oil on each temple and on your forehead. Rub gently into the skin, then sit quietly for several minutes to let this home remedy work. A few simple exercises to stretch your head and neck can help reduce the intensity of the headache.

What else you can do

Medical treatment for headache disorders can often be assisted by the patient in their daily actions. For prevention of headaches it’s important to evaluate your lifestyle and identify areas for improvement. Regular exercise and regular, consistent rest are vital components of preserving a healthy lifestyle. Maintaining a healthy diet, including drinking lots of fluids, might also help prevent symptoms. Identify triggers for your headaches and avoid interaction with these as much as possible. Some possible triggers are include:

  • Certain foods such as aged cheeses, sausages, chocolate, fermented food, MSG
  • Use of alcohol
  • Chemicals such as nicotine, gasoline, glue, household cleaners, perfumes, paint
  • Certain emotions such as stress
  • Disruption in your regular schedule such as skipping a meal or disruption in your sleep pattern
  • Hormones – Many women, esp. migraine sufferers, notice symptoms tend to occur at a certain point in their menstrual cycle
  • Change in environment such as when traveling or a move to a new home
  • Change in weather

When interaction with certain triggers is inevitable, try to develop ways to combat these interactions. Take extra care with your health. Drink plenty of fluids, get extra rest. Minimize interaction as much as possible. When a headache is occurring, preventative measures will not help the emergent need to reduce your pain; but there are some things you can do in an acute situation to help decrease your symptoms. If you take medication at the onset of a headache, try to take the medication at the first sign of symptoms – the earlier the better! During a headache, use a cold compress, lie down in a dark quiet room, and drink fluids (suck on ice if nausea makes it difficult to drink). Try using relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, visualization of a peaceful and  serene scene, progressive relaxation, or massage the muscles of your head and neck.

From: http://neurologicalwellness.com

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 Mailing Address: 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation

 23705 Vanowen St. # 216

 West Hills, CA 91307

 

What Parkinson’s taught me about life- Emma Lawton, age 29 when diagnosed.

What Parkinson’s taught me about life-

by Emma Lawton, age 29 when diagnosed.

Good Morning.  “It’s knowing that the body is just a shell for the good stuff that’s inside.” ~ Emma Lawton

This is a wonderful video by a young woman diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at the age of 29.  Emma touched on 10 things Parkinson’s has taught her about life, herself and other people to show how being diagnosed has been the making of her, leaving her grateful rather than hopeless. She showed us how to reassess our own lives, switch up the positivism, stop sweating the small stuff and learn things in the process. She also showed us how even in the darkest times there’s always something to giggle at.  The video is about 15 minutes long and well worth it

NOTE: We do not include links to external websites in order to avoid spreading any potential computer viruses.

TO SEE THE VIDEO: YOU WILL NEED TO COPY and PASTE the WEBSITE below into your Search bar/ Server see the 15 minute video described above.

COPY AND PASTE THE WEBSITE BELOW INTO YOUR SEARCH BAR IN YOUR BROWSER ( Goggle, Yahoo, etc)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs-vPqfsO0Q

Emma is Head of Creative at SPIXII (an insurance startup), an author and speaker, and was recently featured in the BBC2 documentary ‘The Big Life Fix’, looking at the power of design to transform people’s lives. Diagnosed with Parkinson’s at 29, Emma has written about her experience in her book, Dropping the P Bomb

Go to www.microsoftwatch.org to read about a  new watch that Microsoft built for Emma to control her Tremors.  or enter:  PD Watch by Microsoft into your search engine.

SOURCE:

www.usatoday.com/story/tech/talkingtech/2017/05/10/microsoft-shows-off-watch-quiets-parkinsons-tremors/101517718  ​

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Mailing Address:  The NeuroCommunity Foundation

                                         23705 Vanowen St. # 216

                                               West Hills, CA 91307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Follow these tips to safely enjoy the sun and travel with Parkinson’s:

Summer days are here. For many, that means a summer trip or enjoying the extra sunlight to try a new outdoor activity. Summer is also the time to get your vitamin D. Did you know that our bodies can store Vitamin D from the summer to last through the winter?

Fun in the Sun

Know your spots. Look for a skin growth, mole or beauty mark that changes in size, color or texture.
Look for “sun sensitivity” listed on medication warning labels, which can increase your chances of sunburns.
Every day before leaving your house use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more.

Prevent Overheating

When outside, stay hydrated. Drink water even if you are not thirsty.
Exercise Smart. Try to exercise outdoors in the early morning or late afternoon when it’s cooler.
Know the signs of heat stroke: flushed face, high body temperature, headache, nausea, rapid pulse, dizziness and confusion.

Traveling Tips

Bring your Aware in Care hospitalization kit,  ID bracelet and card everywhere. Order your free Aware in Care kit at www.awareincare.org.
Rest the day before your trip AND the first full day you arrive.

 

For additional  more travel advice, sun safety tips and how to avoid heat exhaustion go to www.3parkinson.org

Music Therapy Wellness clinic at CSUN

Music Therapy Clinic Information

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic at CSUN

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic provides individually designed music activities for children and adults with disabilities * PD, MS, STROKE and TBI)  and special challenges, including autism, developmental delay, physical, mental and emotional disorders, and learning disabilities.

Music therapy is a field that uses music in a prescribed manner as a treatment for rehabilitating, maintaining, and improving the lives of persons with physical, intellectual and emotional disabilities. Music Therapy is a creative arts therapy similar to others such as Art, Dance, and Drama Therapy. It is, however, unique in that music provides an accessible and enjoyable medium for growth and learning. It is a healing art, based on scientific principles and grounded in research.

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic is dedicated to creating an environment where an individual with special challenges can acquire necessary life skills through the unique, creative and enjoyable medium of music. Our therapists are internationally recognized and encompass a range of techniques and areas of expertise. Our entire treatment team is dedicated to creating the opportunity for each participant to express his or her true creative essence while gaining needed skills and enhancing self-esteem.

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic is a teaching clinic for the CSUN Music Therapy Department. As such, all sessions are utilized for student observation and learning and are part of the educational process for future music therapists.

Some of the benefits of Music Therapy include:

  • Development of fine and gross motor skills
  • Improvement in acquisition and application of academic fundamentals
  • Development of practical life skills
  • Increase in socialization
  • Enhancement of self-esteem
  • Expansion of the quality of life through musical enjoyment and creative self-expression

The Music Therapy Wellness Clinic provides individual and group sessions conducted by a highly trained and experienced Music Therapist. A variety of instruments are used, including piano, guitar, percussion, auto-harp, recorder, electronic instruments, harmonica, and voice.

Contact Information

To contact the clinic please call 818-677-5663 or you can email us at csunmtwc@csun.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bike Riding to slow down Parkinsons

BIKE RIDING HELPS SLOW DOWN PD

How Patients Are Using Cycling to Slow Down Parkinson’s

NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt

Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic are finding that cycling is helping patients stop the symptoms of Parkinson’s, and can even do something that medicine can’t do. Outdoor or at the gym, give it a try.

Click here to watch the news report

http://www.nbcnews.com/nightly-news/video/how-patients-are-using-cycling-to-slow-down-parkinson-s-917498947693

 

Managing Parkinson’s Mid-Stride NEW BOOK

Image result for hot off the presses photo

The National Parkinson’s Foundation has  published a new book, “Managing Parkinson’s Mid-Stride,” which is for those who have had PD for a while, and now find themselves not newly-diagnosed but not yet advanced.  Click on the colored link to take you directly to the information.  Managing Parkinsons Mid Stride .

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What caregivers can do to decrease the strain on their relationships

Caregiving: Dealing with the strain on your marriage

Caregiving and marital strain often go hand in hand. Know the impact caregiving can have on your marriage and what you can do about it.

By Mayo Clinic Staff – January 2017

Marriage isn’t always easy. This can be especially true for those acting as a caregiver for a parent, in-law or other loved one with Alzheimer’s. Understand how caregiving might affect your marriage and what steps you can take to protect your relationship.

Source of marital strain

Taking care of someone with Alzheimer’s can be consuming and stressful and that stress can affect your marriage. Caregiving can affect your relationship with your spouse by:

[Read more…]

Information about Inhaled Version of PD medication

                                       

 Levodopa pill can wear off, but a powdered version can come to the rescue, study finds.      

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) — An inhaled version of the Parkinson’s drug levodopa can help when patients experience symptoms between doses of the pill form of the medication, a new, small study finds.

Levodopa can control the tremors, rigidity and difficulty maintaining balance and coordination associated with Parkinson’s disease. However, within two years, as many as half of all patients have rapid and unexpected loss of motor control during “off” periods, when the drug wears off between doses, the researchers explained.

“Off periods are considered one of the greatest unmet medical needs in the treatment of Parkinson’s, and typically increase in frequency during the course of the disease,” said lead researcher Michael Lipp. He is vice president of pharmaceutical development and technical operations at Acorda Therapeutics, the drug’s maker and funder of the study.

[Read more…]

Take Care to Give Care

flowers-06
“Take Care to Give Care

The first rule of taking care of others: take care of yourself first. Caregiving can be a rewarding experience, but it is also physically and emotionally demanding. The stress of dealing with caregiving responsibilities leads to a higher risk of health issues among the Nation’s 90 million family caregivers. So as a family caregiver, remember to pay attention to your own physical and mental wellness, and get proper rest and nutrition. Only by taking care of yourself can you be strong enough to take care of your loved one. You really do need to “take care to give care!”

[Read more…]

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Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

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If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
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