FITNESS for Traumatic Brain Injury

Fitness Considerations for TBI

A TBI can affect one’s movement, balance, cognition, and emotions. The following physical considerations should be taken into account when designing an exercise program. Paralysis may be present in two or all four extremities. Impairments in motor control and coordination as well as limited range of motion and spasticity can occur. Individuals with TBI may have balance issues that affect sitting or standing as well as seizures that result from an abnormality in electric activity in the brain. Cognition is often affected resulting in the potential for mental confusion, memory loss, and impaired ability to learn and process new information. Lastly, emotions may be impacted resulting in mood swings, depression, anxiety, apathy, aggression, and irritable behavior.

An exercise program for a person with TBI should be tailored to address concerns of excessive tone, spasticity, decreased range of motion, decreased cardiovascular and muscular endurance, loss of flexibility, over-use injury, and affected side neglect⁴.  Incorporating physical activity to improve these concerns can increase one’s quality of life and ability to perform activities of daily living skills (ADLS). There are a variety of additional considerations that must be taken into account when creating an effective exercise program for individuals with TBI, including:

  • A typical standing exercise may need to be performed seated or standing while using a fixed-support structured to ensure safety when balance issues are present⁴. The NCHPAD video series on balance training can aid in selecting appropriate exercises to perform.
  • When cognition issues are present, incorporating multi-joint exercises are beneficial in developing retention of complex movement or muscle memory⁴. To maintain consistency and proper form throughout an exercise cueing from a fitness professional or exercise partner may be necessary.
  • Affected side neglect can be addressed with resistive ROM exercises where the individual is actively performing an exercise and the fitness professional is resisting the movement they are performing. This type of exercise allows for the incorporation of strength training into the passive joint or muscle group.
  • Aerobic activity options can include upper and/or lower body ergometers and treadmills. The goal for aerobic exercise is to increase independence in ADLS and decrease risk of cardiovascular disease. Individuals with TBI should focus on intensity of 40 to 70 percent VO2 peak and 13 to 20 on the Borg Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale⁴. Activity should be performed on three to five days per week with 20 to 60 minutes per session.
  • Strength training should include isometric exercises, weight machines, and free weights. The goal is increased independence in ADLS by improving muscular strength and function. Training should be performed on at least two days per week with three sets of eight to 12 repetitions⁴.
  • Flexibility training should include stretching and ROM exercises. The goal is to increase ROM of involved extremities and prevent contractures. These exercises should be performed at least two days per week ideally after aerobic and/or strength training⁴.
  • Neuromuscular training should include coordination and balance activities. The goal is to improve level of safety of ADLS. These exercises should be performed on at least two days per week ideally on the same days as strength training⁴.
  • Warm water pool training is beneficial in individuals with TBI as is provides a weightless environment for the development of functional movement⁴.
  • Individuals with TBI have lower oxidative capacities and faster fatigue rates.  During physical activity make sure to incorporate proper rest between exercises and consider exercise during a time of the day that does not further promote fatigue.
  • Circuit training has been found effective in improving cardiorespiratory fitness of individuals with TBI². This type of training combines resistance exercise with aerobic exercise through a variety of different types of movements. A combination of alternating upper and lower body work with high resistance, short duration exercise with low resistance, longer duration aerobic exercise, and upper body ergometry has been effective in persons with TBI².

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, MSW, LCSW, BCD, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

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What causes brain freeze?

 

What causes brain freeze?

Source:  Texas A & M University

Your favorite ice cream sundae can be the perfect treat to end a hot day. Or maybe a cold smoothie with your favorite fruits and vegetables to start the day strong. No matter your choice of treat, these delicious cold foods — and especially beverages — can stop you in your tracks with a good ol’ case of sphenolopalatine ganglioneuralgia — or brain freeze.

What is a brain freeze?

We’ve all done it — despite our better judgement. The heat and mild dehydration can be overwhelming and cause us to guzzle down a particularly chilly treat that leaves us with a quick and intense headache. After many personal at-home experiments, it’s safe to say that we’ve learned the cause-and-effect portion of what causes a brain freeze. However, it’s deeper than just the cold temperatures ‘freezing’ your brain.

“A brain freeze is what happens when cold food touches a bundle of nerves in the back of the palate,” said Stephanie Vertrees, MD, headache specialist, neurologist and clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Medicine. “The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is a group of nerves that are sensitive to cold food, and when they’re stimulated, they relay information that stimulates a part of the brain to have a headache.”

The SPG and headaches

The SPG is a very important bundle of nerves, and although it’s the source of brain freeze, this group of nerves is also the cause of other types of headaches.

“This is the same ganglion that is responsible for migraine headaches and cluster headaches,” Vertrees said. “There has been a lot of research done on this bundle of nerves, but mostly for trying to prevent these more serious and longer-lasting headaches. We now have two different kinds of devices for the SPG. One device blocks the nerve with a numbing agent, and the other that stimulates it electronically with the goal of eliminating or preventing migraine or cluster headaches from occurring.

Obviously, that approach is a bit extreme for treating a brain freeze, but these links between the different types of headaches can help people who suffer from migraines. “Many people will try to give themselves a brain freeze to try to break a migraine headache,” Vertrees said. “It may not work for everyone or work every time, but giving yourself a brain freeze can possibly alleviate a migraine.”

Avoiding and treating a brain freeze

There are several (obvious) ways to avoid a brain freeze, but fewer ways to treat one. “To avoid brain freeze, eat the cold food much more slowly so that your mouth can warm up the food — don’t inhale it,” Vertrees said. “Keep it in the front of your mouth: the further-back stimulation is what triggers the brain freeze.”

However, if you find yourself a victim to an ice cream headache, there’s a trick you can do to try and warm your way out of one. If you begin feeling a brain freeze coming on, press your tongue to the roof of your mouth. The heat from your tongue will warm up the sinuses behind your nose and then warm the ganglion that caused the brain freeze.

“Brain freezes are not dangerous and very self-limiting,” Vertrees said. “It’s about slowing down and being patient and aware of the likelihood of getting a brain freeze if you eat or drink too fast.”

 

 

TBI research study in children at local medical center

Wanted for Brain Imaging Research

Research study for Children with Recent Traumatic Brain Injuries

UCLA Division of Child Psychiatry

Children with Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) frequently experience problems with various mental and cognitive functions in the months following an injury.

Most children show substantial recovery in these functions during
the course of the first year following a TBI.

This National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded UCLA study
examines the brain processes associated with recovery of cognitive functions, such as attention, learning,memory, and problem solving following a TBI in children and adolescents.

Eligible patients must be between 8 and 18 years old, speak English, have good vision without glasses (contacts are OK), and have experienced a moderate to severe TBI within approximately the last 2-4 months.

Participants will undergo the following procedures twice within the span of one year:
 Two brain imaging exams (MRI), lasting less than 1 hour each
 Behavioral assessments of learning, memory and problem-solving skills, lasting  approximately 3 hours

For more information, contact:
Leila Molina, MA
310-825-0443
lmolina@mednet.ucla.edu

Interested families and patients will be asked to participate in a brief phone interview designed to determine if a child or adolescent is eligible to participate. Participants may earn up to $300 by enrolling in the study and will receive free brain imaging exams (MRI) and a free neuropsychological evaluation with a clinical report to help with diagnostic clarification, treatment planning, and/or educational planning purposes. Reimbursements for travel expenses and lunch will also be arranged.

This study is being conducted by Robert Asarnow, PhD
48-240C UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBI Cognitive Group meets in Burbank

DID YOU KNOW?

There is a Cognitive Group (Mild/Moderate TBI) that meets in Burbank

FOCUS: Traumatic Brain Injury

Treatment Orientation: Cognitive Behavioral (CBT)

Contact  Dr. Narieh Hartoonian  (818) 485-4976 for information, details,

date, time and location.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research studies for TBI in Los Angeles

TBI RESEARCH

Are you sleepy during the day?  Have you had a brain injury?  Did you know there might be a connection between brain injury and feeling sleepy? A clinical research study is now enrolling people with a past brain injury who feel sleepy during the day.  For more information and to find out if you qualify for the study, click on the link below

Rehabilitation Research Center at SCVMC

Christina Weyer Jamora, Ph.D. is conducting a study in conjunction with Marin Brain Injury Network for persons with mild TBI.  For more information, please click on the link below:

Computerized Brain Exercises Study

Children with recent traumatic brain injuries are wanted for brain imaging research.  UCLA Division of Child Psychiatry is conducting a study that examines the brain processes associated with recovery of cognitive functions, such as attention, learning, memory, and problem solving following a TBI in children and adolescents.  For more information and eligibility requirements, please click on the links below:

UCLA TBI Flyer

 UCLA TBI Brochure

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is here for you:

For information about Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, support groups, wellness programs, education events, and local resources in northern Los Angeles County, Ventura County, Central Coast & Central Valley, contact us here or call 818-745-5051 to speak with Jan D. Somers, Education Director, Parkinson & Movement Disorder Information Center, The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

The NeuroCommunity Foundation is a non-profit foundation. We provide support groups, educational conferences, resources, research updates/ clinical trials information and PD events in the SFV/Ventura/Central Coast/ Inland Empire.

 As we rely on donations to continue providing these services at no charge, if you would like to support our efforts, you can donate with ease and security at our website or mail us your gift. Please make sure and note our website as a bookmark in your computer. It is:  www.neurocommunity.org 

 The NeuroCommunity Foundation is exempt from Federal income tax under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donors may deduct contributions to the foundation as provided in section 170 of the Internal Revenue Code.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise and Activities in SFV to manage neurological symptoms

 

Exercise Routines And Activities To Manage Symptoms And Improve Quality Of Life

Live broadcast of Yoga for Parkinson’s with Renee Le Verrier, RYT

Pomona: Casa Colina Parkinson’s Disease Speech and Exercise Group

Azusa: Casa Colina Parkinson’s Disease Speech and Exercise Group

Pasadena: group and private fitness classes, cardio, Pilates, restorative yoga, Gyrotonic Expansion System®, and meditation with Leslie Frank, DPT (neurological program and multiple sclerosis program)

San Gabriel & San Fernando Valleys, Ventura County: fitness and targeted exercises for neurological disorders with Lori Michiel, NASM-CPT

Tarzana and Encino: aqua fitness with Deborah Goldberger (also private and semi-private instruction in your pool)

Encino: adult fitness classes including Tai Chi & Chi Qong at Balboa Sports Center, LA City Recreation and Parks

Northridge: therapeutic exercises on land and in the water at the Center of Achievement Through Adapted Physical Activity at California State University, Northridge (CSUN)

Northridge: Laughter Yoga with Shelley Bell, CLYL, CLYT

West Hills: art therapy with Alison Paolini

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County: Neurotherapeutic Yoga with Colleen Carroll, YT

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County: Nordic Walking with Carol H. Prata

Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley, Santa Barbara: therapeutic and intergenerational orchestra with MusicMendsMinds

Tarzana: Invertigo Dance Theatre is ready to bring its Dancing Through Parkinson’s

Westlake Village: weekly exercise class/Debbie Jew, coordinator
1st Friday of month – Exercise2nd Friday of month – Music Therapy with Debbie Sipos
3rd Friday of month – “Chair” yoga with Jamie Hampton4th Friday of month – Tai Chi with Nora Li

Ventura County: PD Fighters non-contact Rock Steady Boxing Method with Jennifer Parkinson

Ventura County: Laughter Wellness with Arlene Raisner, CLYL

Newbury Park: Anytime Fitness 24-hour gym great workout classes recommended by Judy C.

Camarillo: Mindfullness with Holly Sacks

Camarillo, Ventura: Art of Moving for PD and movement disorders with Camille Torgeson

Camarillo: Focus on Balance, Tai Chi for Rehabilitation, Tai Chi Sun, Aqua Exercise with Camille Torgeson

Ventura: Focus on Balance, Tai Chi for Rehabilitiation, Tai Chi Sun, Walking with Camille Torgeson

Santa Barbara: Move to Connect for PD with Leslie Sack and Ruth Wishengrad

 

Current Research and Funding for TBI

TBI RESEARCH and FUNDING NEWS 

Go to: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/News-Events/News-and-Press-Releases/press-releases/2017 to read about the following research being conducted or click on the title to take you there directly. OR  click on the colored words and that should take you directly to the article.

Gene silencing shows promise for treating two fatal neurological disorders

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

NIH-funded preclinical studies suggest designer drug may treat ALS and spinocerebellar ataxia 2

Study finds genetic basis for drug response in childhood absence epilepsy

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

NIH-funded research suggests genes may help determine optimal treatments…

Scientists discover urinary biomarker that may help track ALS

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

NIH-funded study suggests opportunity to find insights to neurological disease

NIH consortium takes aim at vascular disease-linked cognitive impairment and dementia

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

MarkVCID brings team science approach to small vessel disease biomarkers in the brain

International study suggests Nodding syndrome caused by response to parasitic protein

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

NIH-funded study also identifies potential new mechanism for some forms of epilepsy 

Epilepsy drug discovered in fish model shows promise in small pediatric clinical trial

Friday, February 10, 2017

NIH-funded research suggests zebrafish models may be efficient resource for identifying drugs for clinical use

Designer compound may untangle damage leading to some dementias

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

NIH-funded preclinical study suggests a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

NINDS names Dr. Amir Tamiz as director of the Division of Translational Research

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

The NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) has announced the selection of Amir Tamiz, Ph.D., as the Institute’s director of the Division of Translational Research (DTR). As director, Dr.

NIH initiates pilot grant program for innovative neurological research

Thursday, January 26, 2017

Pilot award strategy designed to enhance funding stability to researchers

Support Groups for Patients and Families

inspriation august

SUPPORT GROUPS FOR TBI Patients and Families

To find the nearest Support Group in your area, go to

Copy and paste the following website, into your browser:

http://biacal.org/brain-injury-support-groups-california.htm

If you are having trouble, please contact us: The NeuroCommunity Foundation.

Click here: neurocommunity@gmail.com and it will take you directly to our gmail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participants needed for new research studies and clinical trials

Participants needed for new research studies and clinical trials

The NeuroCommunity Foundation, in conjunction with the research community, want to ensure you have the opportunity to participate in research studies to help others and yourself. Your participation can assist researchers find new methods to prevent, detect or treat many neurological diseases.The following is a list of available research studies now recruiting interested participants. It is a small portion of the effort and dedication the research community places for advances in treatments for diseases that affect us all.  The following studies include aging, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury.

[Read more…]

Smart Socks Gait Monitoring System Research Study

smart socks

Participants needed for a new research study at Casa Colina Hospital and Centers for Healthcare in Pomona to evaluate Smart Socks Gait Monitoring System for improving rehabilitation outcomes. The Sensoria Smart Socks gait monitoring system is a pair of socks and anklet bands that provide real-time monitoring of gait. Falls and subsequent health issues related to challenges in gait (walking) can occur when individuals are recovering from a stroke or brain injury or are dealing with progressive neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease (PD) or Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The goal of the research study is [Read more…]

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Did you know that you can support The NeuroCommunity Foundation through your everyday online purchases? Amazon.com has a charitable program called AmazonSmile. It is a simple and automatic way for you to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation every time you shop, at no cost to you.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, you’ll find the exact same low prices, vast selection and convenient shopping experience as Amazon.com, with the added bonus that the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to The NeuroCommunity Foundation!

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Dear The NeuroCommunity Foundation friends,supporters and participants.

If you happen to shop at Ralphs and would like to support The NeuroCommunity Foundation, we would be most appreciative!. If you do shop at Ralphs, we will receive 1 % of your purchase through their community
contribution program. The NeuroCommunity Foundation's Non-Profit Org. number ( NP0 # ) is 82287

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